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EPHEMERA  September 2015

EPHEMERA September 2015

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Subject:

GWO conference - Feminist Ecologics

From:

Mary Phillips <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Mary Phillips <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 8 Sep 2015 11:12:25 +0100

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Please see the call for abstracts for a stream on Feminist Ecologics at the 2016 GWO conference - will usual apologies for cross-posting:

9th Biennial International Interdisciplinary conference, 29th June-1st July, 2016
Keele University, UK

GWO2016 Call for Abstracts 

Developing feminist ecologics: Politics, ethics, organization and nature

Stream Convenors
Agnes Bolsø, Norwegian University of Science & Technology, NORWAY
Christine Katz, University of Luneburg, GERMANY 
Mary Phillips, University of Bristol, ENGLAND
Uta Von Winterfeld, Wuppertal Institute, GERMANY

The world faces a multiple crisis that is becoming increasingly manifest in economies, societies and ecologies. Current institutional and organizational policy and practice privilege economic growth while social and ecological imperatives and impacts are backgrounded. Hyper-rationality, relations of domination, and systems and structures that result in the externalizing of costs onto nature and feminized work are destroying natural and societal resources to the point where they can no longer regenerate (Biesecker & Von Winterfeld, 2015 forthcoming). Some feminist scholars argue that the fundamental causes of this multiple crisis originate in binary logic which conceptually links ‘woman’ (and other subordinate groups) with ‘nature’ in mutually reinforcing processes of inferiorization (eg Gaard, 1997; Plumwood, 2002) while others focus on an intersectional approach to the present challenges.  Eco/feminist agendas have set out to critique these ‘unhealthy, life-denying systems and relationships’ but also to move to alternatives which are ‘healthy and life-affirming’ and thus to ‘reimagine, rethink and reshape’ relations to human and non-human nature (Warren, 2000, 200). This has the potential to mount a radical challenge to current organizational and academic discourses and practices surrounding sustainability, social responsibility and justice (Plumwood, 1993). The stream therefore provides an arena through which multiple forms of feminist ecologics can be further discussed and developed in studies of organization within the context of uncertainty and crisis. 

This builds on themes that emerged through similar streams at the 2012 and 2014 GWO conferences which articulated how developing generative approaches to sustainability require perspectives that recognise how relations between human and non-human nature and society are gendered. Feminist engagements with current conditions of environmental failure and decay and critiques of the gendered ways in which organizations, and organization studies, represent, construct and appropriate nature have gathered momentum (eg Katz, 2015 forthcoming; Niamanis & Walker, 2014; Phillips, 2014; Sabelis 2015 forthcoming). However, we acknowledge the gaps within current ecological feminist philosophy in areas such as engaging with post-colonial thought, the representation/appropriation of indigenous voices and practices, corporeality and embodiment and approaches to an ethics of care and we wish to move these debates forward.

We therefore invite philosophical, theoretical and empirical papers that explore an ecological and feminist commitment, practice and politics to the study of gender and nature in the field of work and organization relating to the environment, sustainability and social justice. Our focus is thus on feminist ecologics which can provide a critical analysis of gendered relations with nature, and how that might be subverted and re-imagined to interrogate relations of power, resistance and politics. Areas of interest to this stream include but are not limited to: 
•	Gendering organizational sustainability and environmental change.
•	Masculinity, rationality, femininity, nature.
•	Enhancing feminist approaches to the environment - resistance, politics, ethics.
•	Cross-cultural perspectives on eco/feminism.
•	Intersectional approaches to gender and sustainability. 
•	Post-colonial theories and ecofeminism.
•	Feminist approaches to green economics.
•	Gendered critiques of globalization.
•	Envisioning embodied, emotional or creative responses to ecological crisis and challenges.
•	Critiques of the en-gendering of sustainability discourses and practices.
•	Political and community environmental activism and gender.
•	Eco/feminist spirituality as a means of enacting a critique of hyper-rationality.
•	Queering eco/feminism.
•	Gendered methodologies for sustainability research.
•	Eco/feminist deconstructions of organizational environmental strategy and practice.
•	Eco/feminism, organizations and complex systems.
•	Global inequalities, social justice and the environment.
Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st November 2015 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with 'work in progress' papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to:  [log in to unmask]  Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, department, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract. *Note that no funding, fee waiver, travel or other bursaries are offered for attendance at GWO2016*.

References
Biesecker, A. & Von Winterfeld, U. (2015, forthcoming). Regeneration in limbo: Ecofeminist perspectives on the multiple crisis and social contract, in M. Phillips & N. Rumens (eds), Contemporary Perspectives on Ecofeminism, Abingdon: Routledge.
Gaard, G. (1997). Toward a queer ecofeminism, Hypatia, 12(1), 114-137.
Katz, C. (2015, forthcoming). Using gender theories to analyse nature resource management, in M. Phillips & N. Rumens (eds), Contemporary Perspectives on Ecofeminism, Abingdon: Routledge.
Neimanis, A. and Walker, R.L. (2014). Weathering: Climate change and the ‘thick time’ of transcorporeality. Hypatia, 29(3), 558-575.
Phillips, M. (2014).  Re-writing organizational environmentalism: Ecofeminism, corporeality and the language of feeling, Gender, Work & Organization, 21(5), 443-458.
Plumwood, V. (2002). The Ecological Crisis of Reason, Abingdon: Routledge.
Sabelis, I., Van Vliet, T. & Wels, H. (2015, forthcoming). Hidden Lives, Invisible Vocation?
Giving Voice to Game Rangers’ Wives in Kwazulu–Natal, South Africa, in M. Phillips & N. Rumens (eds), Contemporary Perspectives on Ecofeminism, Abingdon: Routledge.
Warren, K.J. (2000). Ecofeminist Philosophy: A Western Perspective on what it is and why it Matters. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.

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