JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  May 2015

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION May 2015

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: Pilgrim badges

From:

John Dillon <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 30 May 2015 23:22:31 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (118 lines)

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Thanks. Most of the examples of which I'm aware don't seem to have been worn. So this was useful (esp. Biddle, despite his gaffe in treating _eulogia_ as a plural). I'm a little perplexed by Colin Morris on Gregory of Tours. The bit on earth from the tomb furnishing cures and being a prophylactic against snakebite is from _De gloria martyrum_, 6 but there's nothing there about wearing these objects. Gregory's term for them at _GM_ 6, by the way, is _turtolae_, '[little] cakes', presumably referring to their compaction from liquefied earth or rock dust, on which latter cf. the Pilgrim of Piacenza, para. 18. The Pilgrim's word for such a token is _benedictio_, i.e. Latin for Gk. _eulogia_.

The following are a couple of recent, well regarded articles having useful things to say on _eulogiai_ from the Early Byzantine period (though their scope is much broader than Jerusalem and vicinity):

Matthew J. Dal Santo, "Text, Image, and the 'Visionary Body' in Early Byzantine Hagiography: Incubation and the Rise of the Christian Image Cult", _Journal of Late Antiquity_ 4 (2011), 31-54.

Vicky Foskolou, "Blessing for Sale? On the Production and Distribution of Pilgrim Mementoes in Byzantium", _Byzantinische Zeitschrift_ 105 (2012), 53-84, esp. (for Early Byzantine) 54-66.

I haven't seen this one, but it's clearly at least broadly pertinent: Lucy O'Connor, "Christ in Majesty on a Late Antique eulogia token in the British Museum", _Convivium_ (Brepols), 1, no. 2 (2014), 74-87. Abstract at:
http://www.brepolsonline.net/doi/abs/10.1484/J.CONVI.5.103811?journalCode=convi

Best again,
John Dillon

On 05/30/15, Brenda Wallace wrote:

> 
> My own research is coming at this from the opposite direction (ie looking at pilgrim writings from Jerusalem and at reconstruction of the holy city in the medieval period) so not an expert on medals. 
> 
> 
> The Piacenza pilgrim (c 570) writes of the veneration of the Wood of the Cross: “Whilst they are venerating the cross, they offer oil to be blessed in little flasks. When the mouth of one of these little flasks touches the Wood of the Cross, the oil instantly bubbles over, and unless it is closed very quickly it all spills out.” (Wilkinson, Jerusalem Pilgrims before the Crusades, Aris and Philipps 2002 p. 138)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Colin Morris says this:
> 
> 
> “By the late 6th century, metal flasks and glass bottles were being manufactured on a large scale at Jerusalem for sale to pilgrims. The flasks were made of a tin-lead alloy, and must have been relatively cheap to purchase: approaching forty survive, in whole or in part. The glass bottles and pilgrim badges were presumably even more available to the general mass of visitors, and the most accessible objects of all were the baked clay disks, stamped with a pattern, that were formed out of soil from the holy places. These must have been very numerous indeed: one collection of ninety-three has been found in Syria. Gregory, who was Bishop of Tours from 573-594, was familiar with such ‘tablets’. He said that they could be worn to provide protection and also that earth from the tomb of Christ healed diseases and protected from snakebite.. . . 
> 
> Flasks might be inscribed ‘eulogia of the holy places of the Lord Christ’.” Morris, pp 74-77.He footnotes a reference to J Engemann “Palastinensische Pilgerampullen" Jarhbuch fur Antike und Christentum, 16 (1973) 5-27. 
> 
> 
> He also refers to ampullae in the Crusader era, “they reappeared in the twelfth century. Surviving examples were once again made of a lead/tin material, and unlike their distant predecessors were equipped with small handles or ears which served to attach to a belt for easy carrying.”p 228.
> 
> 
> Biddle writes: “Because of their region of origin and because they were in many cases, pilgrim eulogia or mementoes designed to recall the places depicted, objects in this category have a special value as evidence for the original form of Constantines's Edicule.” He illustrates, in addition to various flasks, a pewter medallion depicting the resurrection, 44mm diameter, with a hole at the top clearly designed to be hung on a cord, late 6th to early 7th century, now in Stuttgart. (Biddle, The Tomb of Christ, pp 21-24.)
> 
> 
> I think the inference is that there were both ampullae designed as 'eulogia' and also badges which could be worn; the sources I am looking at are really ones which depict the Tomb of Christ at various eras. 
> 
> 
> Of course, as I am sure you know, the usual 'souvenir badge' for the Jerusalem Pilgrim in the medieval period was a palm branch, hence Chaucer's and others' references to pilgrims as 'Palmers’ - similar to the use of the scallop shell at Compostella. But I am sure that, then as now, there were always traders willing to take money off pilgrims with cheap mass-produced souvenirs!
> 
> 
> Brenda
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Brenda Wallace
> Priest in Charge of Rettendon and Hullbridge
> 93 Ferry Road 
> Hullbridge Essex SS5 6EL
> 01702 2333534 07853 088907
> 
> 
> 
> From: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask])" target="1">John Dillon
> Sent: ‎Saturday‎, ‎30‎ ‎May‎ ‎2015 ‎19‎:‎23
> To: [log in to unmask](javascript:main.compose()
> 
> 
> 
> medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture
> 
> Are the early examples of which you speak actually badges, i.e. devices meant to be worn? Usually I see these referred to as tokens or as _eulogiai_.
> 
> Best,
> John Dillon
> 
> On 05/30/15, Brenda Wallace wrote:
> 
> > 
> > Our earliest source of representations of the tomb of Christ in Jerusalem in the early centuries comes from pilgrim badges (and small ampullae, in lead, glass or pottery, which were filled with holy oil, holy water or earth from the holy places). Some of these date from the 6th/7th century. Information about these in Wilkinson, John: Egeria’s Travels, Aris and Phillips 3rd edition 1999 page 174; Biddle, Martin: The Tomb of Christ,Sutton Publishing 2000, chapter 2; and Morris, Colin: The Sepulchre of Christ and the Medieval West, OUP 2005, p 75.
> > 
> > Brenda Wallace
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > From: John Shinners <[log in to unmask]> 
> > Sent: Saturday, May 30, 2015 1:18 PM
> > To: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]> 
> > Subject: [M-R] Pilgrim badges
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture Does anyone have recommendations for good articles or books on pilgrim badges? I'm especially interested in their evolution.
> > 
> > Also, there is a detail in a picture--by Hinrik Bornemann my slide says--of a bearded man wearing a brimmed, black hat to which are pinned several pilgrim badges, but I have no title for the painting. I have dim memories that he is an anachronistic detail in a crucifixion scene, but I wouldn't bet on it. Does this ring any bells?
> > 
> > Thanks,
> > John
> > 
> > -- 
> > John Shinners 
> > Professor, Schlesinger Chair in Humanistic Studies 
> > Saint Mary's College 
> > Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 
> > Phone: 574-284-4494 or 574-284-4534 
> > Fax: 284-4855 
> > www.saintmarys.edu/~hust(http://www.saintmarys.edu/~hust)

**********************************************************************
To join the list, send the message: subscribe medieval-religion YOUR NAME
to: [log in to unmask]
To send a message to the list, address it to:
[log in to unmask]
To leave the list, send the message: unsubscribe medieval-religion
to: [log in to unmask]
In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
[log in to unmask]
For further information, visit our web site:
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/medieval-religion

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager