JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  March 2015

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION March 2015

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

FEAST - A Saint for the Day (March 5): St. Gerasimus of Palestine

From:

John Dillon <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 6 Mar 2015 00:41:30 -0600

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (71 lines)

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Gerasimus of Palestine (d. 475). According to his probably later sixth-century early Bios (BHG 693), Gerasimus (also known as Gerasimus of the Jordan and Gerasimus of Lycia) was born in Lycia, became a monk and then an hermit, and in about 451 settled down in Palestine at a location near the Dead Sea. He initially opposed the Christological formula of the Council of Chalcedon but came to accept it under the influence of St. Euthymius the Great. In about 475 Gerasimus moved to a place about a mile from the Jordan where he founded a cenobitic monastery with hermitages as well for those who wished to live apart (but who had to partake in the life of the community from Saturday to Monday). During Lent he would break his fast only with the Eucharist. Thus far Gerasimus' early Bios, which is thought to have been a product of someone at his monastery.

In chapter 107 of his _Leimon_ (in English usually called _The Spiritual Meadow_) John Moschus relates how Gerasimus removed a thorn from the paw of a lion, how the lion lived with his benefactor for five years until the latter's death, and how the beast then died of grief at Gerasimus' tomb. This tale of Gerasimus and the lion (BHG 696e) is so similar in its details to the rather later-appearing story of St. Jerome and the lion that it is generally considered ancestral to it. On the other hand, John Moschus' narrative could itself be a development from an earlier story about St. Sabas of Jerusalem (Sabas the Sanctified) recounted in that saint's Bios by Cyril of Scythopolis (BHG 1608). For details see e.g. Luisi Spina, 'MEMENTO TE ESSE LEONEM', _I Quaderni del Ramo d'Oro on-line_ 1 (2008), 217-237, esp. pp. 230ff. <http://www.qro.unisi.it/frontend/sites/default/files/Memento_te_esse_leonem.pdf>.

In the Synaxary of Constantinople and in its descendants in Orthodox and other Eastern-rite churches Gerasimus of Palestine's feast falls on 4. March.

Some medieval images of Gerasimus of Palestine:

a) Gerasimus (at far left, with Sts. Theodore the Sanctified and Pachomius) as depicted in the late twelfth- or early thirteenth-century frescoes of the Palaia Enkleistra ('Old Hermitage') in the St. Neophytus monastery at Tala near Paphos in the Republic of Cyprus (for a slightly better view, click on the image):
http://tinyurl.com/6vkm3gz

b) Gerasimus (at left) as depicted in the earlier thirteenth-century frescoes (1230s) in the narthex of the church of the Holy Ascension in in the Mileševa monastery near Prijepolje (Zlatibor dist.) in Serbia:
http://srpskoblago.org/Archives/Mileseva/Details/n1-w2e2/large/l2-1.jpg
Detail views:
http://tinyurl.com/7x8jejh
http://srpskoblago.org/Archives/Mileseva/Details/n1-w2e2/large/l2-1-1.jpg

c) Gerasimus scenes in the earlier fourteenth-century frescoes (betw. ca. 1311 and ca. 1322) in the church of St. Nicholas Orphanos in Thessaloniki:

Gerasimus (at left) tending the lion's paw (for a better view click on the image):
http://tinyurl.com/l3uqltk
In brighter light:
http://tinyurl.com/nr23s2y

Gerasimus (at left) as the lion leads Gerasimus' ass and a young monk on a trip to gather water for the monastery (for a better view click on the image):
http://tinyurl.com/lk9juvk
Detail view (the ass and a young monk):
http://tinyurl.com/72ocucb
http://tinyurl.com/qfd43fa [at right, two merchants steal the ass]
Detail view (Gerasimus):
https://plus.google.com/photos/110067756467697073060/albums/5247055849101272625/5247086619590851890?banner=pwa&pid=5247086619590851890&oid=110067756467697073060

Two merchants riding camels make off with the ass:
http://tinyurl.com/7yopw63

The ensemble (lower register):
http://tinyurl.com/mo54knk

Matching these scenes with our written texts is a bit difficult. Gerasimus had been riding the ass to a river to get water when he first became aware of the injured lion; the ass was regularly used to transport water back to the monastery. In his early Bios when the ass is stolen by a passing merchant only the lion had charge of it and no young monk is present; when the merchant returns with the ass and is forced to yield it to the lion he has with him two camels that after he runs off follow the returned ass to the monastery. The two heads below the lion could well be part of a later scene or scenes dealing with the return of the ass.

d) Gerasimus (at left; at right, St. Chariton, abbot in Palestine) as depicted in the earlier fourteenth-century frescoes (betw. 1313 and 1318; conservation work in 1968) by Michael Astrapas and Eutychios in the church of St. George at Staro Nagoričane in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia:
https://plus.google.com/photos/110067756467697073060/albums/5245687190076668897/5245687702952705122?banner=pwa&pid=5245687702952705122&oid=110067756467697073060

e) Gerasimus as depicted in the earlier fourteenth-century frescoes (1330s) in the church of the Hodegetria in the Patriarchate of Peć at Peć in, depending upon one's view of the matter, either Serbia's province of Kosovo and Metohija or the Republic of Kosovo:
http://tinyurl.com/7bf7mag
Detail view:
http://tinyurl.com/7wq8q9c

f) Gerasimus (at left; at right, St. Athanasius the Athonite) as depicted in the late fourteenth-century frescoes (1389; restored in the early 1970s) of the monastery church of St. Andrew at Matka in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia:
http://tinyurl.com/7zwxoyu

g) Gerasimus with his lion (the latter only partly preserved) as depicted by Dionisy and sons in the early sixteenth-century frescoes (1502) of the Virgin Nativity cathedral of the St. Ferapont Belozero (Ferapontov Belozersky) monastery at Ferapontovo in Russia's Vologda oblast:
http://www.dionisy.com/eng/museum/118/270/index.shtml

Best,
John Dillon
(matter from older posts lightly revised)

**********************************************************************
To join the list, send the message: subscribe medieval-religion YOUR NAME
to: [log in to unmask]
To send a message to the list, address it to:
[log in to unmask]
To leave the list, send the message: unsubscribe medieval-religion
to: [log in to unmask]
In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
[log in to unmask]
For further information, visit our web site:
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/medieval-religion

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager