JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives


NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives


NEW-MEDIA-CURATING@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Home

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Home

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING  March 2015

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING March 2015

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

March discussion introduction

From:

Irini-Mirena Papadimitriou <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Irini-Mirena Papadimitriou <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 14 Mar 2015 22:50:23 +0200

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (25 lines)

Hello all
I am very pleased to be part of this very interesting discussion, thank you Suzy for the invitation!
First I should apologise for joining the discussion so late, but I have been working in Hong Kong with limited email access. I thought I should maybe mention the project I joined there, as it's relevant to the work I have been doing at the V&A too.
The project, called Bodies of Planned Obsolescence is an art-science research networking project led by Dani Ploeger, and involves a group of artists, scientists, cultural theorists in practice-based explorations, workshops, symposiums and an exhibition on the materiality of obsolete and discarded electronic devices. These events are taking place in Hong Kong, Lagos and a final one in London coming up in June at Watermans. Sharing of the research is being published on the website and blog http://www.e-waste-performance.net.
I share my time between the V&A and Watermans. At the V&A, I am responsible for a few of our Digital Programmes (we set up our team in 2008), and at Watermans I have been curating the exhibition programme since 2010 as well as an annual festival, which I started two years ago, the Digital Performance Weekender. I thought I should briefly mention some of the programmes both at the V&A and Watermans, which are most relevant to the discussion. 
Since we started our team (and since we are part of the Learning Dept), I have been interested in using the Museum as an exchange and ideas lab, where we could share more processes rather than finished work and engage artists, designers, engineers, makers, scientists and other practitioners with the public in collaborative work, discussions and workshops. Often the work we do is linked to the collections or temporary exhibitions too.
Some examples of these programmes include:
- a monthly show & tell/tinkerspace and activities event taking place in the galleries, where artists/designers/makers etc are invited to bring in  a part of their studio to share work in progress and enable discussions by hands on sessions or open activities. In the past this programme has also taken place in temporary exhibitions such as Power of Making in the form of a tinkerspace. 
- Digital Design Weekend, an annual big-scale event at the V&A (part of the London Design Festival) bringing together artists, designers, engineers, scientists exploring intersections of art/design/tech with an interest in contemporary issues and impact of technology e.g digital/cultural value, data & privacy, open source technologies etc. The purpose of the Digital Design Weekend is to explore and present new work and research projects giving audiences the opportunity to meet participants and take part in open workshops and labs. The Weekend is also a networking event with opportunities for artists, engineers, scientists and the industry to meet, work together (not only at the V&A but also longer term). A big part of this event involves collaborative activities and labs, such as hackathons e.g. climate change and wearables in collaboration with the Met Office and makers, fashion designers and the public, or the most recent Open Collaborative Making, which focussed on activities around digital value, e-waste, data and more - again bringing together professionals from different disciplines and visitors. This is the link to a publication from these activities and work presented, supported by AHRC - you can download the publication here: http://uniform.net/blog/october-2014/digital-design-weekend/ 
You can find the programme from DDW 2014 (theme: digital value) here: http://www.vam.ac.uk/whatson/media/uploads/files/Digital_Design_Weekend_Programme_-_Online_2.pdf 
and from 2013 (theme: art, design and science collaborations) here: http://www.vam.ac.uk/whatson/media/uploads/files/Digital_Design_Weekend_29.08.pdf
- finally, Digital Futures, which I started in 2012 to sustain all these collaborations that developed from the annual Digital Design Weekend. Digital Futures is a monthly meetup, open studio event & showcase for researchers, artists, designers and other professionals working with art, design, technology and science intersections. The aim of the event is to offer a space to network, present and share new projects, but also to nurture discussion and future collaborations. As we have been working with many universities and start ups, DF is also an opportunity to share academic and artistic research with the public. Digital Futures has been taking place at the V&A and beyond, with events in tech city, BL-NK Old Street, Mozilla Festival, Dundee Contemporary Arts, Mobile World Centre Barcelona, EVA London Conference and recently in collaboration with SPACE/The White Building.
The sessions format is changing depending on the content, hosting space and participants and it includes talks, panels discussions, work display, open workshops and prototyping. Themes are ongoing linking work and research from different disciplines and include digital value, open data, open/co-design, technology and physicality, making, technology and activism and more. Examples from the recent Money No Object and Disobedient Objects sessions can be found here:
http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/digital-programmes-victoria-and-albert-museum-7422559741 
These programmes that I have been running at the V&A offer a very different format from the work I do at Watermans, where I have to look after our gallery programme, so the format is the more traditional exhibition as a way of presenting work. I was very interested in finding ways to engage visitors with the work developed for or presented in the gallery (expect from talks & workshops), so a few years ago I started a series of exhibitions inviting artists to develop work as part of the exhibition and in collaboration with visitors. 
Some of these projects included: 
- Isoculture by Michael Burton & Michiko Nitta exploring a city of the future isolated from the wider environment where humans become self-sustaining. The artists set up a lab conducting experiments with a group of visitors every week and developing together the exhibition. We also had a group of visiting scientists and organisations such as Horizon. You can see some of their experiments on the website http://burtonnitta.co.uk/isoculture/index.html.
- The Romantic Disease: An Artistic Investigation of Tuberculosis by Anna Dumitriu; in a similar way, we had an open lab in the gallery run by Anna and leading microbiologists (Modernising Medical Microbiology Project) on techniques and methods for artistic engagement with bacteria http://theromanticdisease.tumblr.com
- Is Technology Eating My Brain? by Paul Granjon; a residency-exhibition project where Paul worked with a group of local people in a wrekshop making things using recycled technologies and open source electronics http://www.zprod.org/zwp/robot/is-technology-eating-my-brain-pt1/. The project raised questions about our relation to technology and explored creative approaches to low-impact living, electronic-waste upcycling, social dynamics for alternative futures and artificial creatures.
- More recently the Living Data exhibition by Michael Takeo Magruder, where Michael and 3D visualisation technologies researcher Drew Baker collaborated with a group of young adults to create work for the exhibition.
Another programme at Watermans, which looks at collaborations between artists, technologists, performers, makers, scientists as well as audience participation and dialogue is the annual Digital Performance Weekender (Networked Bodies), an event about performing practices and technology. 
Most collaborations in these programmes happen over time and are based on trust and people’s relationships rather than at an organisation level. One thing I find important for these events is to be flexible and open as much as possible, so rather than having a very strict structure, we try to develop and respond depending on the content, participants etc. From open labs, to hacks and collaborative making events, bringing people together to exchange ideas and collaborate is more important than the outcome (making things), so there is no pressure in creating something (although this fortunately happens most of the time :-).
Looking forward to the rest of the discussion.
All the bestIrini 
 		 	   		  

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager