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MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  February 2015

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION February 2015

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Subject:

Re: MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Digest - 31 Jan 2015 to 1 Feb 2015 (#2015-33)

From:

Pat Cullum <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 2 Feb 2015 08:38:14 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

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medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

You could try this article

Arnold, John H. and Goodson, Caroline (2012) Resounding community: the history and meaning of medieval church bells. Viator 43 (1), pp. 99-130. ISSN 0083-5897.


Dr Pat Cullum BA (Hons) DPhil FRHistS, FHEA
School Co-ordinator for Student Experience
School of Music, Humanities and Media
University of Huddersfield
HUDDERSFIELD HD1 3DH
West Yorkshire UK
Tel: + 44 (0)1484 472315
Fax: + 44 (0) 1484 472655
Email: [log in to unmask]
www.hud.ac.uk/mhm/history/



I'm working on some English post-Reformation churchwarden's accounts, for St Mary Redcliffe, in Bristol. I note that in the mid-C16 bells are rung at full peal for major events such as a royal coronation.

Does anyone here know whether such practises, ie the ringing of the bells to mark 'secular' events, has medieval roots, and any good literature on which kinds of events where rung for before the Edwardian reformation?  For information, at St Mary Redfciffe by the C18 the bells are rung for a range of annual events, as well as commemoratively for major historic turning points: -- examples of the latter include the Gunpowder Plot, the restoration of Charles II, or the Coronation day of the reigning monarch; of the former, the annual arrival of the judge to the city on his circuit, etc. They are also rung for one-off events such as a major military victory or the birth of a royal child. Some trouble is taken to calibrate the scale of the peal to the significance of the event.

Jon

http://joncannon.wordpress.com/




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------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 1 Feb 2015 16:15:23 -0500
From:    Revd Gordon Plumb <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Feb 2nd Candlemass or Presentation of Our Lord in the Temple

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

2nd February: Candlemas or The Presentation of Our Lord in the Temple

Some glass images plus a few others:

Canterbury Cathedral, nXV, c.1178-80:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/22274117@N08/13202500733

Ashbourne, St Oswald, Derbyshire, nXVII, 4a, c.1240:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/22274117@N08/15959572071

York Minster, nXXVIII, 2b-3b,  c.1335 :
https://www.flickr.com/photos/22274117@N08/5036457663/in

East Harling, St Peter & St Paul, Norfolk, East window, 3b, c.1463-80:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/22274117@N08/2480753195
and detail:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/22274117@N08/2480750319

Leicester, Jewry Wall Museum, roundel, late 15thC.:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/22274117@N08/2480750319


Apse Santa Maria Maggiore, mosaic of 13thC.
http://www.christianiconography.info/staMariaMaggiore/presentationMosaic.html

Bodleian Library, Oxford, leaves from Franciscan Antiphoners, Pisa,
mid-late 14thC.:
http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/wmss/medieval/jpegs/don/a/011/1500/01100346.jpg

Pierpont Morgan Library, MS M.302., f.2r, English, c1300-10:
http://utu.morganlibrary.org/medren/single_image2.cfm?imagename=m302.002r.jpg&page=ICA000107021#A3

Metropolitan Museum of Art, Byzantine icon, c.1400-1500:
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/31.67.8

Gordon Plumb


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------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 1 Feb 2015 23:00:44 +0000
From:    Jane Wickenden <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: occasions for bell ringing

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Um... I'm sure you know there was no medieval change-ringing, for.a.start.
I do know that one church (??Ludgate) had to ring the bells whenever
Elizabeth I passed by in the royal barge, which the churchwardens got
rather disgruntled over, given the fees to the ringers. Will ask
campanologist other half about medieval ringing, but somehow I can't
envisage more than 1 or 2 bells at a time.

Jane
On 1 Feb 2015 21:03, "Jon Cannon" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture
>
>
>
> I'm working on some English post-Reformation churchwarden's accounts, for
> St Mary Redcliffe, in Bristol. I note that in the mid-C16 bells are rung at
> full peal for major events such as a royal coronation.
>
> Does anyone here know whether such practises, ie the ringing of the bells
> to mark 'secular' events, has medieval roots, and any good literature on
> which kinds of events where rung for before the Edwardian reformation?
>
> For information, at St Mary Redfciffe by the C18 the bells are rung for a
> range of annual events, as well as commemoratively for major historic
> turning points: -- examples of the latter include the Gunpowder Plot, the
> restoration of Charles II, or the Coronation day of the reigning monarch;
> of the former, the annual arrival of the judge to the city on his circuit,
> etc. They are also rung for one-off events such as a major military victory
> or the birth of a royal child. Some trouble is taken to calibrate the scale
> of the peal to the significance of the event.
>
> Jon
>
> http://joncannon.wordpress.com/
>
>
>
>  **********************************************************************
> To join the list, send the message: subscribe medieval-religion YOUR NAME
> to: [log in to unmask] To send a message to the list, address it to:
> [log in to unmask] To leave the list, send the message:
> unsubscribe medieval-religion to: [log in to unmask] In order to
> report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
> [log in to unmask] For further information, visit
> our web site: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/medieval-religion

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------------------------------

Date:    Sun, 1 Feb 2015 23:36:50 -0000
From:    Anne Willis <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: occasions for bell ringing

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

I very much doubt if the bells would have been rung for a 'full peal' in
modern  terms.  To achieve this you would not only need the bells hung 'full
circle' that is so that the bell could rotate through nearly 360 degrees and
the ringer control precisely when to ring their bell; but you would also
need a 'method' to ring, and these were not developed until after the Civil
Wars. [For the record this year St Peter Mancroft celebrates the 300th
anniversary of what is probably the first true peal of 5040 changes on May
15th ]



'Full peal' in those days would have meant something akin to the call change
'peals' that are so beautifully rung in Devon.
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czJZVuhFcio>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czJZVuhFcio has the classic 'sixty on 3rds'
on handbells plus the typical 'rise and fall' before and after the 'peal'
that would be expected on tower bells.  There are other call change sites
with the clip.



Mid-16th bell hanging technology only used half or  wheels which would not
allow the bell to be swung through most of a circle or allow the degree of
control desirable.

Hanging bells for ringing full circle was a very new technology at the
beginning of the seventeenth century, and was probably evolving through
trial and error, and the fear of a tower collapsing was very real. The
'better sort' of Lacock pointed out that an augmentation at Chippenham had
meant that the churchwardens had to begirth their Steeple with a wooden
frame about it.  Presumably their complaint was written before the following
disaster:

April 21st 1628 being the year in which Calne Tower and steeple fell being a
Tuesday about 5 o'clock in the afternoon

No wonder the 'better sort' of Lacock, not six miles from Calne, and only
three from Chippenham were worried.  In 1639 Calne tower collapsed again,
shoddy building work being blamed.  The tower and spire at Chippenham were
rebuilt in 1635 for a total of 475

In 1638 the churchwardens at Warminster recorded:

Memorandum that in the yeare 1638 the tower of the church . . . was slat [ie
cracked] and when the bells were ringed the slatts did open and shut which
was very dangerous and in tyme might ruin the tower if it had not been

prevented & the materials and doing thereof cost about ffourteen pounds

[Devizes St John cracked some years ago and I can tell you that there is
nothing so alarming as watching a crack in the tower open and close as you
ring.]



  A central tower [as at Warminster and Calne] is much more vulnerable to
the forces of ringing, and a young child recently exclaimed that Bishops
Cannings was like a 'ship at sea' when the bells were ringing.



The website  <http://www.bellringing.org/history/>
http://www.bellringing.org/history/ is probably a good place to start







One of the most curious entries I found for celebratory ringing was a
regular one for All Hallows day at Broughton Gifford in the 18th century.
Old custom retained, or a new one?  I have not seen it in other Wiltshire
accounts of the period









Anne





PS  Out of period, but if anyone is really interested I can let them have a
chapter on Wiltshire Bells 1559-1642









From: medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious
culture [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Jon Cannon
Sent: 01 February 2015 21:04
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [M-R] occasions for bell ringing



medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture





I'm working on some English post-Reformation churchwarden's accounts, for St
Mary Redcliffe, in Bristol. I note that in the mid-C16 bells are rung at
full peal for major events such as a royal coronation.

Does anyone here know whether such practises, ie the ringing of the bells to
mark 'secular' events, has medieval roots, and any good literature on which
kinds of events where rung for before the Edwardian reformation?



For information, at St Mary Redfciffe by the C18 the bells are rung for a
range of annual events, as well as commemoratively for major historic
turning points: -- examples of the latter include the Gunpowder Plot, the
restoration of Charles II, or the Coronation day of the reigning monarch; of
the former, the annual arrival of the judge to the city on his circuit, etc.
They are also rung for one-off events such as a major military victory or
the birth of a royal child. Some trouble is taken to calibrate the scale of
the peal to the significance of the event.

Jon

 <http://joncannon.wordpress.com/> http://joncannon.wordpress.com/




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End of MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Digest - 31 Jan 2015 to 1 Feb 2015 (#2015-33)
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