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NEW-MEDIA-CURATING  January 2015

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING January 2015

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Subject:

Remote artworks and mediated experience: VR as preservation

From:

Jon Ippolito <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Jon Ippolito <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 28 Jan 2015 07:38:23 -0500

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Hi everyone,

Sarah Cook recently asked for CRUMBsters to contribute thoughts on mediated artwork, and Laura Sillars asked for information on virtual reality in art. Last November in Karlsruhe I attended a conference that examined the intersection of these themes. An excerpt from my report on the symposium:

"In his keynote for the November 2014 Digital Archiving conference at the ZAK Center for Digital Tradition (CODIGT), Still Water Co-Director Jon Ippolito presented advanced technologies as both the means for and object of novel preservation techniques. Emerging in Europe and the Americas, these new strategies harness everything from emulation to crowdsourcing to virtual reality.

"Ippolito asked how amateurs with special interest and skill might help professionals accomplish the hard work of documenting and conserving new media despite the ever-increasing pace of technological obsolescence. Entitled 'Wagging the Long Tail of Digital Preservation,' the keynote drew on themes from his recent book co-authored with Richard Rinehart, Re-collection: Art, New Media, and Social Memory.

"One recurring theme was the scanning and representing of physical objects in three-dimensional virtual space. Re-collection surveys several models for crowdsourcing such 3d scans, but in his CODIGT talk Ippolito cited two examples local to Karlsruhe. One was the 3d models being created of media installations by Morgane Stricot, a media conservator at ZKM who was formerly a Variable Media Fellow at the University of Maine’s graduate Digital Curation program.

"Virtual environments by Jesús Muñoz Morcillo, Florian Faion, and Antonio Zea represented a second, more futuristic approach to 3d capture. This team scanned a video sculpture by renowned artist Nam June Paik that incorporates endangered components like CRT monitors and neon tubes, and then re-created it in VR; the result is a 3d rendering that enables the wearer of an Oculus Rift headset to walk around the piece while the video runs in real time. Such 'e-Installations' may someday provide a reference point for conservators that is more robust (if somewhat less accessible) than installation photographs or video footage."

It was fun to walk around the virtual Paik sculpture that had been scanned by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology crew, complete with video playing on all the monitors. 

I don’t share the zeal young gamers seem to have for the Oculus Rift, but that may be I’m old enough to remember the peak of VR hype. I curated a show called Virtual Reality: An Emerging Medium at the Guggenheim in 1993--so I suppose I’m a bit jaded.

Nevertheless I do think inexpensive apps like 123D Catch and Google Cardboard represent a new way to document complex physical objects and installations and applaud the work of Stricot, Munoz-Morcillo, Faion, and Zea.

You can read my report here:

http://www.blog.still-water.net/2015/01/wagging-the-long-tail-of-digital-preservation <http://www.blog.still-water.net/2015/01/wagging-the-long-tail-of-digital-preservation>

and watch my keynote here:

http://youtu.be/1RekENbhsuw <http://youtu.be/1RekENbhsuw>

(Laura, let me know if you can’t find the brochure from the 1993 VR show—I’ll dig one up for you.)

jon
_________________________________________
Re-Collection: Art, New Media, and Social Memory
http://re-collection.net
"Read it if you want to prevail" — Bruce Sterling

> On Jan 21, 2015, at 7:09 PM, NEW-MEDIA-CURATING automatic digest system <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> There is 1 message totaling 77 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. January/Feb 2015 theme: Remote artworks and mediated experience
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 18:42:20 +0000
> From:    "Sarah Cook (Staff)" <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: January/Feb 2015 theme: Remote artworks and mediated experience
> 
> Hi all
> 
> thank you for joining in with this month's discussion - I know many of you are new to the list - and thanks to Rick for that link to the Leonardo journal (Not Here Not There) about AR art (CRUMB has never really hosted a discussion about curating AR art directly but perhaps should consider it).
> 
> I particularly like Alexandra's point that,
> "there are also artworks that I have not had the opportunity experience in person and it is the space afforded by new and social media that has brought them to my attention or allowed me to follow by distance. It has the power to unlock imagination, reveal activity in different time zones, and attempt to capture the un-capturable of ephemeral or conceptual intervention."
> 
> I'd love to hear more examples of this, maybe examples where physical co-presence with the work isn't actually possible for many (i.e. getting to the isle of Skye, or even Antarctica?) or isn't intended - i.e. where the network and its many distributed nodes is the point of the work - perhaps again Art's Birthday is a good example (this year I watched from Dundee a silent Aikido performance in a gallery in London, perhaps Roddy Hunter, the curator, can explain).
> Who remembers Colin Andrews' work Geist, commissioned by New Media Scotland and sited at Pier Arts Centre in Orkney in 2000 in which supposedly haunted locations were networked together and made audible? There is an interesting essay by Chris Byrne about it which was published in the book Hothaus by the University of Birmingham (but which you can read here: http://www.academia.edu/3354052/Space_Place_Interface_Location_in_new_media_art) in which Chris argues that the curatorial role is "involved in setting parameters for the creation of the work and the audience experience, and the relationship to the site where it occurs."  Of course in 2000 we didn't have the social media tools we have now to share information, documentation and experience of that work, to tweet about ghostly occurences.
> 
> Alexandra asks how curators might re-present perspectives on local, rural, and dispersed artworks in absence of first-hand experience - but I wonder what about when first-hand experience isn't co-located with the work in the first place (or is mediated or deliberately dislocated?) - are there works where no one has first-hand experience and that's the point?
> 
> forgive me if this is too much of a dislocated tangent on a late long train journey from one point to another,
> Sarah
> 
> ===
> 
> Dr. Sarah Cook
> Dundee Fellow
> Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design
> University of Dundee
> 
> Visual Research Centre (VRC)
> Dundee Contemporary Arts
> 152 Nethergate
> Dundee  DD1 4DY
> 
> 01382 385247
> [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
> 
> www.crumbweb.org<http://www.crumbweb.org>
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> The University of Dundee is a registered Scottish Charity, No: SC015096
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Digest - 20 Jan 2015 to 21 Jan 2015 (#2015-12)
> ************************************************************************

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