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NEW-MEDIA-CURATING  September 2014

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING September 2014

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Subject:

Re: Video Games dance in the Museum

From:

Sarah Cook <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Sarah Cook <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:28:04 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

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Hello CRUMB

on the topic of Video Games in the Museum, discussion of which has slowed as we all adjust back to the new school year, Doug Sery alerted me to this article by Eric Zimmerman and the 160 comments in response to it:

http://www.polygon.com/2014/9/10/6101639/games-art

I'll welcome any last thoughts on the question of ways in which (or best examples of) critical judgement as applied to video games when it comes to their acquisition and display in the museumů

Sarah




On 29 Aug 2014, at 14:22, "White, Gregor" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Many thanks for all the contributions to the discussion so far. I've been intrigued by much of the debate and have found many of the suggested links and examples offered very useful. I'm heartened that much of the discussion has validated some of our initial thoughts and think that the contributions have added to these and moved the debate on from the first workshop, where we discussed the idea of the feedback loop as an analogy for the exhibit, to looking at increased levels of complexity to games systems and expanded systems that reach into the public sphere.
>
> Going forward I'd be interested in exploring ways in which critical judgements are applied in the museum or exhibition design context particularly in relation to selection and acquisition decisions.
>
> When selecting content for an exhibition or collection of video games, what criteria should be applied? Traditional criteria might include paradigmatic examples of a form that demonstrate typical or ubiquitous elements that are definitive of the form. Given the cannibalistic tendencies of games designers that shouldn't be too challenging but what might the quality criteria be?
>
> Looking through the lens of the V&A , one might look for examples that expose the process of making, both in terms of the quality of the material and the quality of craftsmanship. Can these criteria be applied to video games. Alternatively, one might make an aesthetic judgement of 'beauty' however problematic/contingent that might be...What games or characteristics of a game can be described as beautiful? Finally, one might look for significance. Games or elements of games that either capture the essence of games or watershed developments that change our assumptions; games that capture the public imagination or change the way in which games are experienced and perceived.
>
> I'd like to invite comments on some of these challenges, examples of games, exhibits, collections that you feel exhibit these qualities, or critical approaches to the 'craft', aesthetic and social understanding of the medium.
>
> Many thanks
> Gregor White

The University of Dundee is a registered Scottish Charity, No: SC015096

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