JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for PHD-DESIGN Archives


PHD-DESIGN Archives

PHD-DESIGN Archives


PHD-DESIGN@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

PHD-DESIGN Home

PHD-DESIGN Home

PHD-DESIGN  May 2014

PHD-DESIGN May 2014

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: Qualitative and Quantitative Information

From:

Ken Friedman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related research in Design <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 30 May 2014 02:05:35 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (1 lines)

Dear Don, 
 
Essentially, I agree. Given your earlier note, I thought you had some reason to call it OMT ¡ª but changed it to TOM to make it pronounce as a single word. If there is no reason for OMT, then TOM is OK. 
 
Why OMT? I like models to have acronyms where you pronounce the letter (Oh-Em-Tee). TOM is just as good (Tee-Oh-Em). My thought is that pronouncing the letters adds mnemonic value. For brand names and organisation names, where the shortest and most pronounceable single-word acronym works best. But this is not a hard-line principle, and I can think of many successful counterexamples for both. 
 
Your description of the iterative and start-where-you-begin is a good description of much successful design process: 
 
[Don Norman wrote:] ¡°the iterative experimentation of observations, sketching building, thinking, (ideation), reflection, refinement, etc., is common to many fields and has most likely been practised by designers even before there was a profession called design. You could argue it is what folk designers or craftspeople have always done: observe their own needs, make a tool to satisfy their need, refine it continuously over successive generations -- generations of both the tools and people. That is why many of the best designs derive from these folk craftspeople, whether it is tools for gardening, woodworking, or today, the tools of skilled athletics, hiking, camping, and climbing, etc.: tools designed for and used by the same people who design them.¡± 
 
This is a useful description, whether or not we call a process design, and whether or not people called designers do it. 
 
Those who design start at some given point. They begin with the intention of ending somewhere else, hopefully in a preferred state. The iterative nature of the process often means learning new things along the way that change the preferred goal. And much design activity involves redesign, invention, discovery, or other starting points or ending points that are not fully planned. 
 
Several intriguing books address how some of these issues have instantiated through history as people who were not called designers designed the world we now inhabit. 
 
Henry Petroski¡¯s (1994) Evolution of Useful Things reviews a range of specific artifacts from forks and paper clips to different kinds of tools. Richard Bulliett¡¯s (1990) The Camel and the Wheel examines the specific consequences of two modes of transport. 
 
Two classics place this kind of activity in a broader view of design and technology at a time before the design profession got its name. These are Jean Gimpel¡¯s (1976) Medieval Machine: The Industrial Revolution of the Middle Ages and Arnold Pacey¡¯s (1974) The Maze of Ingenuity: Ideas and Idealism in the Development of Technology. 
 
While history, evolution, and consequences are interesting, you¡¯ve captured the essence of these four books in a single paragraph. 
 
Warm wishes, 
 
Ken 
 
 
Ken Friedman, PhD, DSc (hc), FDRS | Editor-in-Chief | Éè¼Æ She Ji. The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation | Published by Elsevier in Cooperation with Tongji University | Launching in 2015 
 
University Distinguished Professor | Swinburne University of Technology ||| Guest Professor | College of Design and Innovation | Tongji University | Shanghai, China ||| Adjunct Professor | School of Creative Arts | James Cook University | Townsville, Australia 
 
Email [log in to unmask] | Academia http://swinburne.academia.edu/KenFriedman | D&I http://tjdi.tongji.edu.cn 
 
-- 
 
References 
 
Bulliett, Richard W. 1990. The Camel and the Wheel. (Morningside Books.) New York: Columbia University Press. 
 
Gimpel, Jean. 1976. The Medieval Machine: The Industrial Revolution of the Middle Ages. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston. 
 
Pacey, Arnold. 1974. The Maze of Ingenuity: Ideas and Idealism in the Development of Technology. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press. 
 
Petroski, Henry. 1994. The Evolution of Useful Things: How Everyday Artifacts From Forks and Pins to Paper Clips and Zippers Came to be as They Are. New York: Vintage Books. 
 
 
 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------- 
PhD-Design mailing list  <[log in to unmask]> 
Discussion of PhD studies and related research in Design 
Subscribe or Unsubscribe at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/phd-design 
----------------------------------------------------------------- 

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager