JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives


NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives


NEW-MEDIA-CURATING@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Home

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Home

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING  March 2014

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING March 2014

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: March Discussion Begins: The Performativity of Code

From:

"David .Packwood" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

David .Packwood

Date:

Thu, 27 Mar 2014 15:45:05 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (282 lines)

Please remove me from this thread. I couldn't care less about the
performativity of code.

David


On 26 March 2014 20:20, Ami Clarke <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>
> Hi all, thanks for inviting me Victoria, and apologies for not being able
> to contribut until now.
>
>
> I've been trying to find an
> appropriate place to butt in, with these great threads of thought that are
> unravelling here.  I've not managed to
> read everything, so apologies if this is just a repetition of stuff already
> said.  I'm not someone who can comp code
> either - I come at it from a post-digital publishing and natural language
> pov.
> and various performativities I can see at play.
>
> I'm Ami - I run a reading room with
> an archive dedicated to Artists' publishing and experimental project space
> on a
> train platform in Hackney: Banner Repeater - the location's important for a
> number of reasons but crucially to site critical art within what might be
> termed the public realm.  We open at 8am
> in the morning (4 days a week) to take advantage of the public transport
> networks to distribute Artists works, publications and pamphlets to a
> packed
> platform of commuters (4,000 footfall a day - they don't all stop...).
>
> There's a long back story to the
> conceptual framework of the project (that I tend to call a technical
> object) -
> railways regularised time during industrialisation - concepts of time and
> labour (and diagrams) play an important part in the programme - as are the
> transport networks to distribute artists publishing (and other alternative
> publishers) - it
> allows us to consider both material and immaterial networks of
> communication,
> in relation to what I call post-digital publishing (both digital and
> paper) -
> which takes into account the history of publishing - ie authorship, issues
> of
> copyright, intellectual property and so on.
>
> I'm both facilitator of this space
> as an artist and specifically I'm interested in the performativity of
> language
> (in terms of it always having been so) but now amplified due to digital
> media
> and extensive interconnectivities.  My work that runs in tandem with the
> running of the space also address' these concerns in a variety of ways.
>
>
> Of importance to my thinking is
> Christian Marazzi (the political economist's) comments that
>
> "language operates in the symbolic realm of 'institutions like
> money, property, marriage, technologies, and work itself"
>
> and that
>
> "communication
> processes [are] the crux of today's social and political transformations",
>
> I would include publishing, as a form of
> performance, and as an instrument of production, bringing forth through
> creative acts for all extents and purposes, our lived reality.
>
> What I'm really intrigued by - and
> this relates to structures (cybernetic theories of homeostasis, feedback
> loops,
> autopoiesis and so on) now in place through a variety of coding mechanisms
> - is
> what is actually creatively possible within these structures?  - that
> isn't immediately assimilated into a whirlpool of images and a
> torrent of text that slips by at such speed as to be incomprehensible -
> that
> doesn't profit the old hierarchies that exploit through a lense of
> efficiency and profit.  I'm v
> interested in intensified uses of these same structures as potential
> strategies - especially related to language.
>
> I'm afraid my comments may be a
> little broad for this conversation, so apologies if that's the case.
>
> I've really liked what I've had time
> to read - especially a few comments:
>
>
> Hi
> Barbara and list,
> >>
> >> So a diagram of this, then, would be a line made up of points, with no
> >> hierarchy of parts or actions, so that each point can cross-reference
> >>any
> >> other.
> Victoria
>
> And then the comments from Barbara
> Lattanzi and Laura Plana Gracia were great too
> _____
>
> Picking up on Stephanie's point
> below about digital labour makes me think about code performativity from
> the
> other end. In Stephanie's examples, people are effectively performing for
> code.  Tom Schofield
> _____
>
> I wanted to pick up on Victoria's
> question around bodies and performativity as well as comment on something
> Rachel mentioned. I actually don't think the body is always the one giving
> the
> code life per se (although in my Hacking Choreography example it is) but
> the
> human element is what is interesting to me.   Kate
> ____
>
> Observing the cybernetic feedback
> loops in each of those cases, both for myself and for my students has been
> rather a challenge. How is one inside and outside of such a loop? How are
> we be
> both inside and outside of language?   Justin Lincoln
> _____
>
> Beyond the look of code, though,
> what interests me these days are various strategies to unpack ideology in
> code,
> or ways power, though code, is formed/masked via its operation in culture.
> Critical Code Studies, Software Studies, Platform Studies, E-Lit, and
> "digital
> humanities" (troublesome as the term may be) in general, are exciting in
> this
> regard
> ______
>
> But in some sense, programming
> cannot be live at all. Programmers
> don't program *in* time, they program *with* it. Back to that knitting
> analogy; programmers work with the thread of execution, or the
> timeline, by working on the higher-order level of the knitting
> pattern. The thread of time does not run through their fingers, but it
> does run through their ears, and their computers. Their fingers are
> instead working on the knitting pattern which are working outside of
> time, controlling the whole process, composing and manipulating
> patterns for present and future iterations.
>
> No wonder then that live coders rarely look present at all in the
> performances they give. Their audience experience the music now, but
> the live programmers step out of time, abstracted out into an amodal,
> ungrounded timeless void. In a strange reversal the audience create
> all the spectacle, and the performers sit quietly in the corner,
> completely still apart from flurried typing and the occasional sip of
> mezcal. Maybe the next step for programmers is to learn to work with
> time while being in it.  Alex.
> ______
>
> Jack mentioned Gregory Ulmer, and I
> find Ulmer's take on Derrida (in _Applied Grammatology_) super provocative
> and
> productive. The idea is that human language progresses via slippages which
> happen during actual utterance events. So rather than always concerning
> ones-self with adhering to the etymology of a word (as if a word's
> historical
> etymology was somehow God-ordained), one can also concern ones-self with
> the
> future evolution of a word.   Curt
>
> Ami
>
>
> Banner Repeater
> Platform 1
> Hackney Downs Railway Station
> Dalston Lane
> Hackney
> E8 1LA
>
> www.bannerrepeater.org
>
>
> >________________________________
> > From: Jack Stenner <[log in to unmask]>
> >To: [log in to unmask]
> >Sent: Wednesday, 26 March 2014, 12:42
> >Subject: Re: [NEW-MEDIA-CURATING] March Discussion Begins: The
> Performativity of Code
> >
> >
> >Thanks again for assembling this discussion Victoria and Suzy. It's been
> wonderful and I've learned a lot...the creative juices are flowing!
> >
> >
> >On Mar 24, 2014, at 9:29 AM, Victoria Bradbury <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> >
> >> In the spirit of CRUMB's practical approach to research, I propose that
> we
> >> spend the final week giving examples of
>  performativity and code within our
> >> own work by responding to a question of When:
> >>
> >> When, in your own art practice, does performativity occur?  Is it when
> the
> >> code is written? Is it when you perform with your body or voice?  When a
> >> participant encounters your work?  At all of these points, at another
> time,
> >> or not at all?  Can you give a specific example?
> >>
> >> You may choose to comment on the way you are defining performativity in
> >> your answer (many definitions have been offered over the course of the
> >> month).
> >
> >All of the above, + life. Life is a performance that is revealed through
> the artifacts we construct.
> >
> >Game-Space (2008-10):
> >The performativity
>  of spectatorship. Institutional looking, local and distributed looking,
> what it means to look at and be looked at. Human and machinic looking. Not
> only do we use computer vision to track lookers, we simulate their
> "viewpoint" and mirror that to the network. The machine performs the look,
> creating a hybrid subject (complete with errors). Here, the situation is a
> sort of "stage set" for the performance of viewing.
> >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TasxQbTFeDU
> >
> >Open House (2010-2):
> >Again, a stage set for the play of looking, but also the tangibility of
> interacting. The squatters embody the space/place simultaneously living in
> an artwork. Viewers, both local (neighbors), and distributed (network via
> computer or mobile) commingle with the space/place/squatters, so the
> encounter is performative and durational
>  (2+ years). The set of performances discussed in the video below, are
> more traditionally structured "acts" that play out specific aspects of
> conceptual interest within the "set."
> >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwpUJdU2yiU
> >
> >Maintaining Appearances (2010):
> >The performance of social code; the act of obscuring "reality" to
> preserve order. Simultaneous performativity from first and third person
> points-of-view. Documentation of a first-person life performance.
> >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ypTuiD3a9E
> >http://jackstenner.com/art/maintaining-appearances
> >
> >Murphy's Well-Being (2012):
> >Multiple levels of performance here. We, the EmerAgency (collective),
> performed as an art consultancy, advising the community on social policy,
> privileging well-being to complement the typical advice provided by
> corporate, governmental and scientific experts. While that was a
> "performance" we took it seriously: art can provide/perform the missing
> balance in social deliberation. Then there was the performance of the
> community in our dealings with the issues surrounding ecological disaster,
> particularly when the work was unveiled to those on opposite sides of the
> battle. The code was performative in that the set of conditions that
> structured the display of information was designed to create dynamic
> associations through montage, etc.
> >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2Hs1K495Pc
> >http://emeragency.electracy.org/projects/murphys-well-being
> >
> >That's more than enough. I think any work that incorporates interactivity
> necessarily engages performativity. I recall a sculpture I made back in the
> '90s called "Blink" that was essentially a Donald Judd chrome box with a
> switch and shutter. I was reading (and barely understanding) Whitehead at
> the time, and like Curt mentioned for himself, it had a HUGE impact on me.
> I was thinking about how interaction (computer or otherwise) interrupted
> classic notions of contemplation and context.
> >
> >So for me, performativity, via code or otherwise, naturally emerges from
> concept and context. Very often it is the way we assist understanding
> rather than illustrate it; doing versus showing, enacting versus watching,
> emphasizing behavior more than
>  process.
> >
> >Jack
> >
> >
>

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager