JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for RESEARCH-DATAMAN Archives


RESEARCH-DATAMAN Archives

RESEARCH-DATAMAN Archives


RESEARCH-DATAMAN@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

RESEARCH-DATAMAN Home

RESEARCH-DATAMAN Home

RESEARCH-DATAMAN  February 2013

RESEARCH-DATAMAN February 2013

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

DNA can't be anonymised

From:

Chris Morris <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Research Data Management discussion list <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 12 Feb 2013 11:27:16 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (1 lines)

Hi, 
 
In UK legal terms, my DNA sequence is sensitive personal data, and the data subjects are not only me, but also my relatives. Consent from me alone shouldn't give you the right to publish it. What is more, it can't be anonymised. Like a fingerprint, it can always lead back to me. Unlike a fingerprint, you don't necessarily need government resources to make the link, as this recent paper in Science proved: 
 
Title: Identifying Personal Genomes by Surname Inference Science, Vol. 339, No. 6117. (18 January 2013), pp. 321-324, doi:10.1126/science.1229566  Key: citeulike:11901986 
 
Abstract: 
Sharing sequencing data sets without identifiers has become a common practice in genomics. Here, we report that surnames can be recovered from personal genomes by profiling short tandem repeats on the Y chromosome (Y-STRs) and querying recreational genetic genealogy databases. We show that a combination of a surname with other types of metadata, such as age and state, can be used to triangulate the identity of the target. A key feature of this technique is that it entirely relies on free, publicly accessible Internet resources. We quantitatively analyze the probability of identification for U.S. males. We further demonstrate the feasibility of this technique by tracing back with high probability the identities of multiple participants in public sequencing projects. 
 
Regards, 
Chris Morris 
STFC 
BioMedBridges Project 
 
... 
From:    Gareth Knight <[log in to unmask]> 
Subject: Re: Risks of de-anonymizing data 
 
... 
 
As a side-note, a recent NY Times article on use of DNA sequences (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/18/health/search-of-dna-sequences-reveals-full-identities.html) highlights the potential for identifying larger groups of people, including family members who were not part of the study. I'm not sure of the legal implications, but it would be useful to mention as a topic for discussion. 
 
Regards, 
Gareth 
 
 
-- 
Gareth Knight 
Manager, 
Research Data Management Support Service London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT 
Telephone: (+44) 020 7927 2564 
www.lshtm.ac.uk/library http://lshtmlib.blogspot.com/ @LSHTMlibrary @LSHTMarchives 
 
 
>>> James Wilson <[log in to unmask]> 11/02/2013 14:37 >>> 
Dear Colleagues, 
 
Here at the Damaro Project we've started fretting about the increased risk of anonymized medical (& social sciences) data being de-anonymized as more and more datasets become available and the opportunities for cross-searching increase. We'll be preparing some RDM training for medical researchers shortly, and it would be good if we knew a bit more about the issues involved. Is this even something worth worrying about (I'm not very familiar with medical data)? Could any of you point us in the direction of any advice? 
 
Yours All, 
 
James 
 
 
--- 
Dr. James A. J. Wilson, 
Project Manager, DaMaRO Project 
 
...... 

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
December 2008
November 2008
September 2008


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager