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MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  November 2012

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION November 2012

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Subject:

Feasts and Saints of the Day: November 17

From:

John Dillon <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 17 Nov 2012 17:07:28 -0600

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text/plain

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medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Herewith links to the two parts of an earlier (2010) 'Saints of the day' for 17. November (including, in Part 1, Sts. Acisclus and Victoria; Sts. Alphaeus and Zacchaeus; St. Gregory the Thaumaturge; St. Anianus of Orléans; St. Namatius of Vienne; St. Gregory of Tours; St. Florin; and, in Part 2, St. Hild, St. Lazarus of Constantinople; St. Hugh of No[v]ara; St. Hugh of Lincoln the bishop; St. Elizabeth of Hungary):
Part 1: 
http://tinyurl.com/c42rlpz
Part 2:
http://tinyurl.com/d4b3pg5


Further to Acisclus and Victoria:

In the first paragraph of that earlier post's notice of these saints, for 'Passio sanctorum Aciscli et Victoriae_' please read '_Passio sanctorum Aciscli et Victoriae_'.

In the fourth paragraph of the same notice, for 'dame dedication' please read 'same dedication'. A revised set of views, etc. of the twelfth-century ermita Sant Iscle y Santa Victòria de les Feixes at Cerdanyola del Vallès (Barcelona):
http://www.poblesdecatalunya.cat/fotos/normal/023370.jpeg
http://tinyurl.com/dy92s4k
http://www.poblesdecatalunya.cat/element.php?e=567
http://tinyurl.com/yzyb8jz
http://www.salillas.net/cerdanyola/sant_iscle.htm


Further to Gregory the Thaumaturge:

A revised set of links to portrayals of this saint:

a) Gregory the Thaumaturge (at right; at left, St. Basil the Great) as depicted flanking the Theotokos on a tenth-century enameled cross from Constantinople now in the British Museum, London:
http://www.corbisimages.com/Enlargement/WF001733.html

b) Gregory the Thaumaturge as depicted in the late tenth- or very early eleventh-century so-called Menologion of Basil II (Città del Vaticano, BAV, Vat. gr. 1613):
http://tinyurl.com/3qvb8yn

c) Gregory the Thaumaturge as depicted in the earlier eleventh-century mosaics (restored between 1953 and 1962) in the katholikon of the monastery of Hosios Loukas near Distomo in Phokis:
http://tinyurl.com/33pgbpm

d) Gregory the Thaumaturge as depicted in a mid-eleventh-century mosaic in the cathedral of St. Sophia in Kyiv / Kiev:
http://www.pravenc.ru/data/461/475/1234/i400.jpg

e) Gregory the Thaumaturge (at lower left; at lower right, St. Gregory of Nazianzus) as depicted in the later twelfth-century frescoes (ca. 1164) in the church of St. Panteleimon (Pantaleon) at Gorno Nerezi (Skopje municipality) in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia:
http://tinyurl.com/7o5bpdb
Detail view:
http://tinyurl.com/7k65f47

f) Gregory the Thaumaturge as depicted in an icon variously dated to the twelfth century (probably) and to the fourteenth, now in the State Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg:
http://tinyurl.com/22t8wzz

g) Gregory the Thaumaturge (second from left in this panel) as depicted in the later thirteenth-century frescoes (betw. 1260 and 1263) in the altar area of the church of the Holy Apostles in the Patriarchate of Peć at Peć in, depending on one's view of the matter, either the Republic of Kosovo or Serbia's province of Kosovo and Metohija:
http://tinyurl.com/yjz6t7j

h) Gregory the Thaumaturge as depicted in the late thirteenth- or very early fourteenth-century frescoes, attributed to Manuel Panselinos, in the Protaton church on Mt. Athos:
http://tinyurl.com/269etzr
Detail view:
http://tinyurl.com/23l2oxl

i) Gregory the Thaumaturge (at left; at right, St. Epiphanius of Salamis) as depicted in the earlier fourteenth-century frescoes (betw. ca. 1308 and ca. 1320) by Michael Astrapas and Eutychios in the church of St. Nicetas the Goth (Sv. Nikita) at Čučer in today's Čučer-Sandevo in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia:
http://tinyurl.com/3ma4dov

j) Gregory the Thaumaturge as depicted in the earlier fourteenth-century mosaics (ca. 1312) in the parecclesion (now a museum) of the former church of the Pammakaristos (Fethiye camii) in Istanbul:
http://tinyurl.com/2c8f4wx

k) Gregory the Thaumaturge (at lower right, after St. Dionysius the Areopagite) as depicted in the earlier fourteenth-century frescoes (betw. 1313 and 1318; conservation work in 1968) by Michael Astrapas and Eutychios in the church of St. George in Staro Nagoričane in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia:
http://tinyurl.com/6e62phy
Detail view:
http://tinyurl.com/4xkf94j

l) Gregory the Thaumaturge as depicted in the earlier fourteenth-century frescoes (betw. ca. 1313 and 1320) by Michael Astrapas and Eutychios in the King's Church (dedicated to Sts. Joachim and Anne) in the Studenica monastery near Kraljevo (Raška dist.) in Serbia:
http://tinyurl.com/25n3lyt

m) Gregory the Thaumaturge as depicted in the earlier fourteenth-century frescoes (between 1335-1350) in the altar area of the church of the Holy Ascension at the Visoki Dečani monastery near Peć in, depending upon one's view of the matter, either the Republic of Kosovo or Serbia's province of Kosovo and Metohija:
http://tinyurl.com/6a4odzs

n) Gregory the Thaumaturge as depicted in a November calendar portrait in the earlier fourteenth-century frescoes (between 1335-1350) in the narthex of the church of the Holy Ascension at the Visoki Dečani monastery near Peć in, depending upon one's view of the matter, either the Republic of Kosovo or Serbia's province of Kosovo and Metohija:
http://tinyurl.com/yl2cr76

o) Gregory the Thaumaturge (lower register; above, St. John the Eleemosynary and a bishop St. Leontius) as depicted in a fourteenth-century fresco in the monastery monastery of St. John the Theologian (Sv. Ioan Bogoslov) at Zemen in western Bulgaria:
http://tinyurl.com/bsotv4e

p) Gregory the Thaumaturge, as the student Theodore, listening along with his brother St. Athenodorus to Origen and, at right, as bishop Gregory operating a miracle as depicted in a later fifteenth-century copy (1463) of Vincent of Beauvais' _Speculum historiale_ in its French-language version by Jean de Vignay (Paris, BnF, ms. Français 51, fol. 27v):
http://tinyurl.com/y9dzc3k


Further to Anianus of Orléans:

In that earlier post's notice of this saint, the link to a French-language account of Orléans' crypte Saint-Aignan no longer functions. Use this instead:
http://tinyurl.com/al5dcwg

In the same notice, the first of the links to French-language accounts of Orléans' église Saint-Aignan no longer functions. Use this instead:
http://tinyurl.com/bb358lz
In the same notice, the link to a satellite view of this church no longer functions; likewise the second of the several links to 'Other exterior views' of said church.

In the same notice, add to the matter on the originally early twelfth-century chapelle Saint-Aignan in Paris that -- as Christopher Crockett pointed out in a follow-up post from 2010 -- it is oldest above-ground ecclesiastical structure surviving on the Île-de-la-Cité. In the same follow-up post Christopher also observed that:
'the rather high quality of its stonework and of the carving of its capitals
http://www.paris.catholique.fr/IMG/jpg/sa11.jpg
http://www.paris.catholique.fr/IMG/jpg/sa16.jpg
is a precious and quite rare testimony to what sculpture looked like in the
early [pre-Gothic] 12th c. at least, for work which was commissioned by Rich People.' 
 
In the same notice, a revised set of views of the originally eleventh-/twelfth-century église collégiale Saint-Aignan at Saint-Aignan-sur-Cher (Loiret), starting with the exterior:
http://www.lesaulnaies.ovh.org/envir02.jpg
http://tinyurl.com/bjrv46b
http://tinyurl.com/asqs764
http://tinyurl.com/alod8s5
http://www.all-free-photos.com/images/loire/PI5996-hr.jpg
http://tinyurl.com/bx4vh86
http://tinyurl.com/achchmj
Multiple views, mostly of the interior (incl. some of the crypt):
http://emonnier48.perso.sfr.fr/Centre/Loir%20et%20Cher/staignan.htm
Other interior views:
http://tinyurl.com/yrqd4u
http://tinyurl.com/ah6okvy
http://tinyurl.com/c7tt8z6
http://tinyurl.com/cgr39ph
Crypt:
http://tinyurl.com/d7rmzly
http://tinyurl.com/c28tj9u
http://tinyurl.com/bm4jf24
http://tinyurl.com/bq3x7r3
http://tinyurl.com/bu3kvpl
Central chapel in crypt:
http://tinyurl.com/ayafqfx
Frescoes in the crypt:
http://www5e.biglobe.ne.jp/~truffe/image/st-aignan.jpg(http://www5e.biglobe.ne.jp/%7Etruffe/image/st-aignan.jpg)
http://tinyurl.com/al92tfn
http://tinyurl.com/aukm2g9
http://ckenb.blogspot.com/2012/10/fresques-bis.html
http://www.flickr.com/photos/aliennor/4094885901/


Further to Florin:

In that earlier post's notice of this saint, the link to the illustrated, German-language account of the originally late eleventh- or early twelfth- to sixteenth-century Florinskirche in Koblenz is not functional. Use this instead:
http://tinyurl.com/c4x5ps3
In the same notice, the last two links to views of that church also no longer function.


Further to Hild:

In that earlier post's notice of this saint, the link to the English-language account of Whitby Abbey with a virtual tour of the ruins no longer functions. The Sacred Destinations page of views of remains of the abbey church:
http://tinyurl.com/afw8r3e
Further views thereof:
http://www.historvius.com/whitby-abbey-1406/pictures/649/
http://www.whitbyonline.co.uk/whitby-photos/whitby-395/


Further to Elizabeth of Hungary:

In that earlier post's notice of this saint, the link to a view of her tomb in the St. Elisabethkirche in Marburg no longer functions. Use this instead:
http://tinyurl.com/as2nsb7
Another view of Elizabeth's shrine in the same church:
http://www.wga.hu/art/zzdeco/1gold/13c/02g_1200.jpg
Detail views of the shrine's portrayals of Elizabeth succoring the poor:
http://www.wga.hu/art/zzdeco/1gold/13c/02g_1201.jpg
http://www.ev-kirche-bickenbach.de/elisabeth6.jpg
http://tinyurl.com/2uayxd5 
In the same notice, the link to a multi-page German-language site on this church no longer functions in that way. The church's own virtual tour is here:
http://www.elisabethkirche.de/Virtueller-Rundgang.406.0.html
 
An illustrated, German-language page on Elizabeth's arm reliquary of ca. 1240, since 1833 in the possession of the house of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn at Schloss Sayn in Bendorf (Lkr. Mayen-Koblenz) in Rheinland-Pfalz:
http://tinyurl.com/22o9dqh
Two other views of this object:
http://tinyurl.com/2crbfz8
http://www.heiligenlexikon.de/Fotos/Elisabeth-Reliquiar.jpg 

Further portrayals of Elisabeth:

a) Elizabeth as portrayed in an earlier thirteenth-century statue, thought to be from very shortly after her canonization in 1235, in the (ex-)cathedral of Sts. Peter and Paul in Naumburg:
http://tinyurl.com/2c92wjh
http://tinyurl.com/2f7q5qc

b) Elizabeth tending the sick as depicted in the late thirteenth-century (ca. 1285-1290) Livre d'images de Madame Marie (Paris, BnF, ms. Nouvelle acquisition française 16251, fol. 82v): 
http://tinyurl.com/268a74o

c) An expandable view of Elizabeth as depicted in a late thirteenth-century copy of French origin of the _Legenda aurea_ (San Marino, CA, Huntington Library, ms. HM 3027, fol. 157r):
http://tinyurl.com/28ej2gw

d) Elizabeth (at right; at left, St. Clare of Assisi) as depicted by Simone Martini in an earlier fourteenth-century fresco (1317) on the entrance to the cappella di San Martino in the lower church of the basilica di San Francesco at Assisi:
http://www.wga.hu/art/s/simone/3assisi/1saints/saints40.jpg
Detail view (Elizabeth):
http://www.wga.hu/art/s/simone/3assisi/1saints/saints41.jpg

e) Elizabeth (at left with Sts. Margaret of Hungary and Henry of Hungary) as depicted by Simone Martini in an earlier fourteenth-century fresco (1317) in the south transept of the lower church of the basilica di San Francesco at Assisi: 
http://www.wga.hu/art/s/simone/3assisi/transept/5saints2.jpg 

f) In legend, the young Elizabeth was forbidden by her father to distribute food to the poor. She of course did so anyway and was stopped for inspection, whereupon the food was changed miraculously to flowers (or was miraculously covered by them). E. is so depicted (at right) in a fresco of ca. 1337 formerly in the chiesa di Sant'Elisabetta d'Ungheria in Perugia and now in the Galleria Nazionale dell'Umbria in that city:
http://tinyurl.com/25vzodw 

g) Elizabeth at prayer as depicted in an earlier fourteenth-century French-language collection of saint's lives (Paris, BnF, ms. Français 185, fol. 223r):
http://tinyurl.com/27kq28s

h) Elizabeth experiencing a vision as depicted in an earlier fourteenth-century copy (1348) of the _Legenda aurea_ in its French-language version by Jean de Vignay (Paris, BnF, ms. Français 241, fol. 305r):
http://tinyurl.com/23dvsks

i) Elizabeth holding flowers as portrayed in a panel of a late fourteenth- or very early fifteenth-century painting attributed to Gherardo Starnina (formerly known as the Maestro del Bambino Vispo) and sold at auction at Sotheby's in 1962:
http://tinyurl.com/35ct4rd
Expandable grayscale views of the painting as photographed prior to that sale are here:
http://tinyurl.com/3x2fuzp
Where is the painting now?

j) Elizabeth as depicted in an earlier fifteenth-century (ca. 1414) breviary for the Use of Paris (Châteauroux, Bibliothèque municipale, ms. 2, fol. 415v):
http://tinyurl.com/32rasnx 

k) Elizabeth experiencing a vision as depicted in an earlier-to-mid-fifteenth century Franciscan breviary of Milanese origin (Paris, BnF, ms. Latin 760, fol. 573r):
http://tinyurl.com/2a7psrq

l) Elizabeth holding her flowers (at right; at left, St. Francis of Assisi) as depicted by Piero della Francesca in his later fifteenth-century Polyptych of Sant'Antonio (ca. 1460-1470) now in the Galleria Nazionale dell'Umbria in Perugia:
http://www.wga.hu/art/p/piero/1/3anton04.jpg

m) Elizabeth succoring the poor as depicted in a later fifteenth-century copy (ca. 1480-1490) of Vincent of Beauvais' _Speculum historiale_ in its French-language version by Jean de Vignay (Paris, BnF, ms. Français 245, fol. 175r):
http://tinyurl.com/2by2xdw

n) A surprisingly elderly Elizabeth (she was only twenty-four when born into eternal life) holding her flowers as portrayed (second from left; at left, St. Francis of Assisi) by Andrea della Robbia in about 1500 in his great terracotta relief of the Madonna and Child with Saints in the chiesa di Sant'Agata in Radicofani (SI) in Tuscany:
http://tinyurl.com/26h953j

o) An also elderly Elizabeth as portrayed in a late fifteenth- or earlier sixteenth-century statue in the Stiftskirche in Stuttgart:
http://tinyurl.com/35wdpkr 

p) Elizabeth as portrayed in an earlier sixteenth-century statue (ca. 1520) of Bavarian origin, ascribed to the workshop of Hans Leinberger and now in the Musée de l'Oeuvre Notre-Dame, Strasbourg:
http://tinyurl.com/arrm23z


Today (17. November) is also the feast day of:

Gennadius of Constantinople (d. 471). A priest of Hagia Sophia at the time of his election in 458 as patriarch of Constantinople, Gennadius is probably best known for his encyclical letter of 458 or 459 condemning simony. He received the monophysite patriarch Timothy II of Alexandria (Timothy "Aelurus" to his foes, he is a saint of the Coptic Orthodox Church) in an attempt to bring him over to Chalcedonian orthodoxy and, when that failed, probably had a major role in persuading the emperor Leo I to banish him from his see. Similarly, Gennadius supported the Chalcedonian patriarch of Antioch Martyrius against the machinations of the monophysite Peter the Fuller, whose usurpation of that see led in short order to Leo's banishing him at Gennadius' request. His numerous commentaries on books of the Bible, now surviving only in fragments, led his contemporary Gennadius of Marseille to praise him both for his writing ability and for his sharp intellect. The later sixth-century historian Theodore Lector relates that Gennadius 1) healed the hand of a painter that had shriveled after he (the painter, that is) had portrayed Christ with the attributes of Zeus, 2) correctly predicted the death on the following day of the contumacious priest Charisius, and 3) experienced a vision in which the devil informed him that he could make no headway against the church whilst Gennadius lived but would succeed in this once the patriarch had died.

Gennadius' repuration for sanctity and defense of orthodoxy survived into the later twelfth and early thirteenth centuries, when St. Neophytus the Recluse penned an Encomium of him (BHG 667; betw. ca. 1170 and 1214) underscoring these aspects of the saint's life. Neophytus further relates, in an account now and perhaps always unsupported by earlier testimony, that toward the end of his life Gennadius, not wishing to die in Constantinople under heretical rule, secretly left Constantinople, visited the Holy Land, went on to Cyprus in an attempt to find the former hermitage of St. Hilarion of Gaza, and died of cold and exhaustion on a 20. November in the mountains near Paphos. Still according to Neophytus, who seems to have been creating patriarchal precedent for his own life as an hermit in the same vicinity, Gennadius' body, once found, was recognized by the bishop of Paphos and given honorable burial, after which it remained on Cyprus as the heretical emperor Anastasius (Anastasius I; r. 491-518) was unwilling to have it returned to the capital.

Orthodox churches generally celebrate Gennadius on 17. November, his day of death as recorded in the Synaxary of Constantinople (which latter also has commemorations of him with different sets of patriarchs on 20. November and 25. November). Some celebrate him on 31. August. Gennadius has yet to grace the pages of the RM.

Gennadius (at right; at left, his immediate predecessor St. Anatolius of Constantinople) as depicted in a full-length portrait in the earlier fourteenth-century frescoes (betw. 1313 and 1318; conservation work in 1968) by Michael Astrapas and Eutychios in the church of St. George at Staro Nagoričane in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia:
http://tinyurl.com/3hgz9ff

Gennadius (at far right, after St. Metrophanes and St. Methodius Pataron) as depicted in a portrait bust in the earlier fourteenth-century frescoes (betw. 1313 and 1318; conservation work in 1968) by Michael Astrapas and Eutychios in the church of St. George at Staro Nagoričane in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia:
http://tinyurl.com/85p8tna 

This blog post (with text in Greek followed by the same matter in English) offers expandable views of the remains of Gennadius' church at the village of Moronero in Kallepia (Paphos prefecture) in the Republic of Cyprus:
http://tinyurl.com/74rf9sm
Slightly earlier views of the same church:
http://tinyurl.com/7rjrgdj
http://tinyurl.com/867q3ug
http://tinyurl.com/7hpzd97
http://www.flickr.com/photos/philphotography/5253379787/
http://tinyurl.com/6smebjs 
http://tinyurl.com/7ydp477

Best,
John Dillon

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