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CCP4BB  July 2012

CCP4BB July 2012

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Subject:

Re: harvesting in cold room (was: cryo for high salt crystal)

From:

"Radisky, Evette S., Ph.D." <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Radisky, Evette S., Ph.D.

Date:

Sat, 14 Jul 2012 04:47:35 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (38 lines)

Thanks, these are great links!
Evette

On Jul 13, 2012, at 7:39 PM, "Andrew Purkiss-Trew" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Quoting Jacob Keller <[log in to unmask]>:
> 
>>> 
>>> The expansion ratio of liquid to gaseous nitrogen is approximately 1:700,
>>> that is, 1 liter of liquid becomes 700 liters of gas (at room temperature).
>>> When you are in a room that is 3 (~10ft) meters tall, 6 (~18ft) meters wide
>>> and 10 (~30ft) meters long and you assume that it is poorly ventilated
>>> (i.e. no gas replacement at all), then you will have 3x6x10 = 180m3 volume
>>> of gas, which is 180,000 liters. Air consists of 21% oxygen and is
>>> considered deficient if it goes down to 19.5%. OSHA recommends having
>>> monitors present in the case you might, in worst case scenario, reach
>>> 19.5%. Note: I don't know, but it seems unlikely that you are critically
>>> injured at 19.5%
>>> 
>> 
>> How can this OSHA number be right? At fairly high altitude, say 2500 m, the
>> partial pressure of O2 will be about 75% of that at sea level, and most are
>> okay with it--so how can a drop from 21% to 19.5% have any importance? Is
>> N2 competing with O2, perhaps? Never heard of that. Can N2 really be a
>> poison, such that we are constantly poised at the cusp of suffocation?
>> 
> 
> Not N2 poisoning, but lack of Oxygen in the blood. At altitude, the body adjusts by breathing deeper and faster and people can become acclimatised (so giving rise to altitude training for athletes). The really dangerous levels, for a healthy adult, are a fair way below the 19.5%. The UK generally seems to have O2 alarms set at 19% and maybe a second alarm at 17%.
> 
> More details are given on the OHSA website (http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_id=25743&p_table=INTERPRETATIONS  found with a quick google) and on one of the UK Liquid Nitrogen supplier's websites (http://www.cryoservice.co.uk/oxygen_depletion.aspx)
> 
> Hope this helps,
> 
> Andrew Purkiss
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------
> This message was sent using IMP, the Internet Messaging Program.

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