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NEW-MEDIA-CURATING  January 2012

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING January 2012

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Subject:

Re: quick piece of research regarding artist's television

From:

Sarah Cook <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Sarah Cook <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 19 Jan 2012 13:59:27 +0000

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Thanks Sean and Simon too...

I always love how when you ask a curator a question they respond first with a list, second with a personal experience, and sometimes third with a theory. :-)

I should clarify that I'm not researching artists' tv experiments at the moment (we did that when we did the show Broadcast Yourself in 2008) and that it is the job of the editor of this forthcoming publication from the Finnish Institute (the formidable and fantastic Hanna Harris) to communicate bits of that history in her book... I'm merely the inbetween person trying to help two of the artists (Nina Pope and Karen Guthrie) get some distance on their own work (TV Swansong) in particular - allowing us to think about how that project - or a project like that - sits today (perhaps in relation to these other works from art history).

So yes, Simon, it is a huge topic, but I'm really thinking aloud mostly about one part of it...

Is there currently a lack of the equivalent of "broadcasts which anthologised video art" - i.e. curated collections of work? Is this another strength of TV Swansong, that it was also somewhat curated? By artists? Does this make it an interesting parallel to something like Van Gogh TV - with layers of audience, some at live events, some at the broadcast of them?

Simon writes: "we thought we were doing one thing perhaps we were doing another - and it was the artists who were working in blissful ignorance of reality. Whatever, it didn't last. The medial substrate the artists had in common is long gone, conceptually and materially..."

so is the medial substrate - the web today - forcing a similar constriction on projects, where again artists might think they are doing one thing (broadcasting internationally irrespective of time zones; file sharing) but perhaps are actually doing another (creating models of distribution that commercial entities might later adopt)?

thanks for indulging the thinking aloud
sarah

 






On 19 Jan 2012, at 13:43, Cubitt S.R. wrote:

> There's the excellent survey of course:
> Mulvey, Laura and Jamie Sexton (eds) (2007), Experimental British
> Television, Manchester University Press, Manchester.
> 
> And materials on David hall's TV Experiments on his site and at
> rewind.ac.uk
> 
> Bill Viola's reverse TV was one of a number of commissions in the 1980s at
> WGBH Boston
> 
> Stan Douglas told me about an experiment he did in Vancouver with TV
> interruptions: the station got so many complaints they started putting a
> notice up before each of them saying it was "art", and no more complaints
> - but also, a/c Stan, no art either because the whole point was to
> interrupt
> 
> 
>> Michael's comments that
> 
>> also I've been very disappointed with presentations
>> of artists film/video on the net which take the form of "channels" or
>> "broadcasts" 
> On the other hand many of us treasured for years broadcasts which
> anthologised video art (Terry Flaxton and Penny Dedman's Video, John
> Wyver's Illuminations series, and several others).
> 
> Also interesting were experimental works working with pop music shows -
> Peter Donebauer's Videokalos video synthesiser and Dan Sandin's analog
> video synth in the states.
> 
> And finally the brief but glorious flowering of pirate TV in mid-80s
> Brixton
>> 

-- 
University of Sunderland - life-changing: see our new TV advert at
http://www.lifechangingsunderland.com or http://www.sunderland.ac.uk

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