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PHD-DESIGN  November 2011

PHD-DESIGN November 2011

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Subject:

texts

From:

Victor Margolin <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related research in Design <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 31 Oct 2011 22:38:19 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

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text/plain (924 lines)

Dear colleagues:
I would like to add my two cents to the discussion about book lists, bibliographies, and literature maps. What I was calling for is something that exists in all developed fields, a mapping of the significant texts in the field since the time the field began. In philosophy for example, the major texts are positioned in particular times and places where they relate to other texts and to events. In art history, where I wear one hat, there is definitely a sense of the canonical texts, beginning in the 19th century. Art historians understand how their field began, which texts were seminal at different periods, and what the issues of contemporary times are. When a department teaches a course in art historical methods, it uses the same seminal texts that appear in most courses. Consequently, there is some coherence to the field as well as a body of criticism of earlier texts as a way of deconstructing older dominant ideas and making way for new ones. All texts exist in a time and place and were written by someone or someones with a particular raison d'être. in essence, they are part of a field's intellectual history. Its interesting to note that such a history exists in the field of the history of technology exemplified by the journal Technology and Culture. There was even a book called Technology's Storytellers which historicizes the leading articles in the journal over a period of twenty years or so. In the design research field, as exemplified by this list, there is a lot of talk about texts but not much critique of them. In fact, texts often seem transparent as the discussion focuses on methodology and other topics that people address from their own perspective comparable to a cafe jam session. In Design Discourse, a book I edited in 1989, I included a bibliographic essay of postwar design literature that was grouped by country and issues. It was a foray into intellectual mapping without the full depth of an intellectual history (which we also need). Its a least a start towards what I believe will eventually be essential for the design research field as it matures.
Victor

Victor Margolin
Professor Emeritus of Design History
Department of Art History
University of Illinois, Chicago







On Oct 31, 2011, at 7:00 PM, PHD-DESIGN automatic digest system wrote:

> There are 17 messages totaling 1084 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. screens and shoes (2)
> 2. Books lists vs. bibliographies, annotated bibliographies, and conceptual
> maps
> 3. Why website displays are not like paper displays
> 4. Cumulus - global association to serve art and design education and
> research
> 5. The shoemaker'c children: designers who produce lousy web pages
> 6. The History of 'Modern Flat' (8)
> 7. Ken’s post on Zotero Group ‘Research Through Design’ (2)
> 8. Request: Annotated Design Research Bibliography
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Sun, 30 Oct 2011 21:19:19 -0400
> From: Francois Nsenga <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: screens and shoes
>
> Dear Gunnar
>
> Today, Sun, Oct 30, 2011, you wrote:
>
> "At ECU, we struggle to help our students become people who make stuff AND
> think (and who use the way they make stuff in order to think.)"
>
> I am curious to learn what precisely you teach your students to think
> about, and how you go about teaching them to think about it.
>
> Regards
>
> Francois
> Montreal
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2011 18:18:34 +1100
> From: Ken Friedman <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Books lists vs. bibliographies, annotated bibliographies, and conceptual maps
>
> Dear Colleagues,
>
> On June 29, Victor Margolin posted a note headed “Literacy.” Victor
> draws a clear distinction “between a list of resources and an
> intellectual history that locates texts in a framework of when they were
> written, what they responded to, how they addressed what came before
> them, what effect they had on what came after them, what other texts
> they relate to, when and where were these other texts produced.”
> [Victor's original post appears at the end of this note.]
>
> Victor dismisses such projects as the Zotero book list: “I am not a
> big fan of lists if the material on the lists has no context, no
> relation between the texts. The basic point of my initial post was to
> argue for a mapping of texts and issues as a way to orient old and new
> researchers so that thought in the design research field can develop as
> it has in other fields where such mapping has occurred. The point is not
> to collect resources but rather to know where and when they originated
> and why.”
>
> It is a misreading to claim that Victor’s note calls for “a
> bibliography of seminal design literature.” A list without context or
> commentary is irrelevant to Victor’s concerns. He did not ask for a
> bibliography, but rather a series of tools such as focused literature
> review articles and, to a lesser degree, annotated bibliographies.
> Zotero offers neither.
>
> The problem of this latest list lies in the inability to distinguish
> between a list, a bibliography, an annotated bibliography, and a
> literature review.
>
> A bibliography is a structured list of published resources organized in
> a consistent bibliographic format. This formatting principle makes it
> easy for everyone using the bibliography to locate and work from the
> same documents. A proper bibliography uses a specific citation style
> such as APA, MLA, or one of the two Chicago styles – “notes and
> bibliography,” or “author-date.”
>
> A bibliography generally focuses on a single theme or topic, though it
> may contain subsidiary sections within a larger topic. Most
> bibliographies are organized alphabetically by the author’s last name.
> Other principles are possible. For example, a bibliography might be
> organized chronologically to show the evolution of a field. A
> bibliography is a resource list.
>
> But Victor has no interest in yet another resource list. Victor’s
> challenge calls for: “an intellectual history that locates texts in a
> framework of when they were written, what they responded to, how they
> addressed what came before them, what effect they had on what came after
> them, what other texts they relate to, when and where were these other
> texts produced.”
>
> While a properly structured bibliography is a step up from a list, even
> a well-structured bibliography doesn’t fulfill Victor’s goal. There
> are two ways to move toward Victor’s goal. One might be possibly done
> as a software-based community project. The other requires a single
> author or a small team of authors. The first is an annotated
> bibliography. The other is a literature review.
>
> An annotated bibliography supplies a bibliographic note for each item
> in a bibliography. This note – the annotation –describes each item
> with well-structured information. An annotated bibliography generally
> provides consistent notes that allow the reader to compare and
> understand the items in relation to one another, taking the first step
> toward what Victor describes as “a mapping of texts and issues as a
> way to orient old and new researchers so that thought in the design
> research field can develop as it has in other fields where such mapping
> has occurred.”
>
> Those who wish to learn more about how to write a good bibliographic
> note will find useful guidance on the nature, purposes, and content of
> an annotated bibliography on the University of New South Wales Learning
> Center web site:
>
> http://www.lc.unsw.edu.au/onlib/annotated_bib.html
>
> The UNSW site notes that robust notes should contain all or some of the
> following elements, depending on purpose, word limit, and cited
> sources:
>
> 1) full bibliographic citation, 2) the background of the author or
> author, 3) the content or scope of the text, 4) an outline of the main
> argument, 5) a description of the intended audience, 6) a description of
> the research methods, if applicable, 7) conclusions, 8) reliability, 9)
> description of special features that are unique or helpful, such as
> charts or graphs 10) the relevance or usefulness of the text for
> research, either for the field in general or, in some cases, the
> specific research of the author of the annotated bibliography, 11) the
> way that the text relates to themes or concepts, 12) the strengths and
> limitations of the text, 13) the view or reaction of the author of the
> annotated bibliography to the text.
>
> While the UNSW site writes for an audience of students with an emphasis
> on bibliographic notes written for course work, the outline can be
> adapted to most annotated bibliographies.
>
> Cornell University has an excellent guide on how to prepare an
> annotated bibliography:
>
> http://olinuris.library.cornell.edu/ref/research/skill28.htm
>
> Like the UNSW site, the Cornell site calls for consistent, well
> formatted citations in an appropriate reference style. In concise notes,
> the author of the bibliography should examine and review the items in
> the bibliography, 1) summarizing the theme and scope of each
> publication, 2) evaluating the authority or background of the author of
> each items, 3) commenting on the intended audience, 4) comparing or
> contrasting this work with other items cited in the bibliography, and 5)
> explaining how this work illuminates the bibliography topic.
>
> The Cornell site emphasizes the critical analysis of information
> sources:
>
> http://olinuris.library.cornell.edu/ref/research/skill26.htm
>
> What Victor’s note really calls for is a series of critical
> literature reviews. A critical literature review is a conceptual mapping
> tool, and that is Victor's challenge to the field. I’ll post a note on
> the nature and purposes of the critical literature review another time.
> At the moment, I’m in Delft for the IASDR conference. This morning,
> we’re holding the doctoral colloquium. Some of the best new
> researchers from around the world present the work they are doing to
> complete a PhD, with the idea that interaction and consultation with
> each other and with senior scholars will help them to develop and
> improve their thesis projects.
>
> Yours,
>
> Ken
>
> Professor Ken Friedman, PhD, DSc (hc), FDRS | University Distinguished
> Professor | Dean, Faculty of Design | Swinburne University of Technology
> | Melbourne, Australia | [log in to unmask] | Ph: +61
> 39214 6078 | Faculty
>
> --
>
> Victor Margolin wrote:
>
> --snip--
>
> Much has been written on this list since my initial post a few days ago
> about literature and literacy. Ken amplified some of my points by
> discussing a field's need for a literature and the importance of knowing
> the literature and building on it. The discussion has moved to websites
> and programs to keep track of high volumes of reading material. The
> point I wish to return to is the function of core reading material in a
> field's development. In that spirit, I would like to distinguish between
> a list of resources and an intellectual history that locates texts in a
> framework of when they were written, what they responded to, how they
> addressed what came before them, what effect they had on what came after
> them, what other texts they relate to, when and where were these other
> texts produced. It is this intellectual history of design studies and
> design research that a good PhD program should provide so that a student
> can locate her or his own thinking within a trajectory, as I mentioned
> in my initial post. As to the gendering of texts, by first locating them
> within an intellectual history, one can expose the gender implications
> and patterns within which they exist. There are particular moments when
> women began to publish texts on design history or design and these
> moments have increased as many more women have entered the fields of
> design and design research. I am not a big fan of lists if the material
> on the lists has no context, no relation between the texts. The basic
> point of my initial post was to argue for a mapping of texts and issues
> as a way to orient old and new researchers so that thought in the
> design research field can develop as it has in other fields where such
> mapping has occurred. The point is not to collect resources but rather
> to know where and when they originated and why.
>
> --snip--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2011 09:11:04 +0000
> From: marcio rocha <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Why website displays are not like paper displays
>
> Don't forget something important to add to all this information about
> website and webdesign.
>
> The variety and limitations of the different users.
> People with especial needs, blind, movements limitation, cognitive
> limitations, and so on.
> Put all together, and work with web design has been a huge challenge for
> everyone which
> need to work with web design in a high level of quality.
>
> Marcio Rocha
>
>
> On Sun, Oct 30, 2011 at 4:50 PM, Don Norman <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Gunnar said, and i quote:
>>
>> "Websites are not like paper displays. It's probably a mistake to think
>> that websites are like websites, however."
>>
>> Brilliant
>>
>> Don
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Marcio Rocha
>
> Transtechnology Research
> University of Plymouth, UK
> http://trans-techresearch.net/researchers/marcio-rocha
>
> +0 7553 614185
>
> Federal University of Brazil
> Visual Arts Faculty
> Graphic design Department
> www.fav.ufg.br
> www.ufg.br
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:44:29 +0000
> From: Salmi Eija <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Cumulus - global association to serve art and design education and research
>
> Dear All PhD-Design Colleagues,
>
> thanks for Marcio for informing all about Cumulus = Cumulus International Association of Universities and Colleges of Art, Design and Media -
>
> www.cumulusassociation.org
>
> What is Cumulus?
> ========================
>
> Cumulus is a platform for partnership in art, design and media education and research.
> Cumulus was founded as a network in 1990 by the Royal College of Art in London and the University of Art and Design Helsinki (Finland).
> It consisted in the next phase of six universities from Europe and was happy to e.g. to be supported by European Union Erasmus programme of the time.
> Over the years the interest towards Cumulus grew and some Erasmus networks merged with Cumulus. In 2001, Cumulus started to be together
> in the form of an association but in a very unique way - trying to avoid too much administration and letting people to gather together under its umbrella the way people want.
> Today Cumulus is 176 institutional members from 44 countries. Cumulus does not seek members for money and is fully non-profit. It can reach all its close to 200.000 students and
> many thousands of people working as academics and staff.
>
> What Cumulus does?
> ========================
>
> It is an umbrella for people to be together like this PhD-list. As a standard form for Cumulus members to share, transfer knowledge and best plus worst practices is to meet
> during the conferences under Cumulus umbrella hosted by its member institutions two times a year. Some of them are more towards research, some of them less but almost all do include a
> research part in the programme and through a CfP. There are also content specific Cumulus working groups - like Visual Communication, Sustainability Working group, Leadership and Strategy and so on... and they do meet normally during the conferences.
>
> Cumulus members can also organize events marketed through Cumulus site. Also, other events that are organized under Cumulus umbrella are done - like
> in 2012 alongside the two main conferences; Helsinki Finland World Capital Year event in May 2012 and Santiago Chile November 2012, there will be one with Hermitage and Cumulus March 2012 and October with the Russian Designers Association and Cumulus and so on. Cumulus has also job section in its site and is open what the members do need. Partners do many collaborate among themselves as they wish - e.g. mobility, projects together, joint research projects etc. Cumulus also organizes exhibitions as some examples in Louvre Paris 2002 and 2010 in Shanghai celebrating Cumulus 20 years anniversary being part of World Expo 2010 year. Cumulus Executive Board is also very active by organizing events and activities under the Cumulus umbrella.
>
> Cumulus has partnerships for instance with the American designer´s association AIGA and some more in the professional field are to come; European League of the Institutes of the Arts, Cumulus is recognized by Unesco, partnership with US accreditation institution NASAD, With the European Union OHIM agency in Alicante Spain responsible for registering trademarks and designs, Desis Network for Social Innovation and Sustainability, Cumulus has declared Kyoto Design Declaration in 2008 that Cumulus Green is an award prized every now and then and many more good things to serve the whole of art, design and media. The secretariat of Cumulus is according to the decision of Cumulus hosted by its member institution and it is taken care by the Aalto University School of Art and Design in Finland.
>
> Go and see - www.cumulusassociation.org
>
> Next main conferences in 2012
>
> Helsinki Finland 23-26 May 2012 Aalto University School of Art and Design - Northern World Mandate - Cumulushelsinki2012.org/
> Santiago Chile 14 - 17 November 2012 Santiago, Chile Instituto Profesional DuocUC http://www.duoc.cl/cumulus2012/
>
> If you get interested just please email to us;
>
> [log in to unmask]
> [log in to unmask]
> Christian Guellerin; [log in to unmask] - Cumulus President Nantes France
>
> Best,
>
> Eija & Justyna
>
> Eija Salmi (mrs)
> Director International Affairs Aalto University School of Art and Design
> Secretary General
> Cumulus International Association of Universities and Colleges of Art, Design and Media
> www.cumulusassociation.org
> http://taik.aalto.fi/en/
> www.aalto.fi
>
> Mailing address: PO BOX 31000, 00076 Aalto, Finland
> Visiting address: Hämeentie 135 C 000560 Helsinki
> tel. +358947030534
> fax. + 358947030595
>
> "Cumulus is the only global association representing art, design and media education in the world. It was founded in 1990 and has today 176 prominent members from 44 countries".
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related research in Design [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Marcio Dupont
> Sent: 30. lokakuuta 2011 2:10
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Cumulus - global association to serve art and design education and research
>
> Hi friends
>
> Just found this interesting association, Cumulus, the only global association to serve art and design education and research.
>
> http://www.cumulusassociation.org/home
>
> Best!
>
> *Marcio Dupont Caballero de Carranza*
> Industrial Designer and Sustainability Analyst
>
> Linkedin <http://br.linkedin.com/in/marciodupont>
> Sustainable Design Blog <http://marciodupont.blogspot.com/>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:35:18 +0000
> From: Vicky Teinaki <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: The shoemaker'c children: designers who produce lousy web pages
>
> Hi all,
>
> I've been waiting for someone to take the web-design-in-large-orgs perspective on this, it hasn't happened so I guess I'll have to do it.
>
> Sure, the site isn't that great, but to go to the lengths to suggest one shouldn't study there? For having an old (the technologies and archive trawls suggest it hasn't changed since the mid noughties) website?
>
> It's one thing for a consultant to criticise a site, another to actually work on a site redev and have to push any changes through multiple levels of bureaucracy and programme name changes (yes, I know of sites stuck in beta for years while the design discipline names keep changing).
>
> Were this a discussion about what should and should not be discussed on a design education website, I'd feel this was an appropriate forum. However, as it stands, I'd have much rather seen web design criticism and the like happen in a forum such as the IXDA (Interaction Designers Association). http://www.ixda.org/ (For those interested in things web-devvy, it has free membership and highly recommended, even if Twitter and FB mean it doesn't have quite as many posts as it used to). I know at least one member occasionally chimes in with his perspective from working on the US military site: that's a real eye opener in terms of both levels of sign-off and their design constraints.
>
> As it stands, this argument reminds me much of the Dustin Curtis vs American Airlines website story, as chronicled on Fast Company: http://www.fastcompany.com/blog/cliff-kuang/design-innovation/how-self-defeating-corporate-design-process-one-designer-finds-ou
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2011 14:13:33 +0200
> From: esra bici <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>
> Dear all,
> Hope you are all fine.
> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
> 'modern flat'.
> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
> standardized into flats?
> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
> contexts.
>
> Cheers,
> Esra.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:12:09 -0300
> From: luis vasconcelos <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>
> dear, esra,
> although it is not much, here goes something to begin with:
> http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-12483492
> maybe this lucy worsley can be a good source for your research.
> kind regards,
> arthur.
>
> On Mon, Oct 31, 2011 at 9:13 AM, esra bici <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> Dear all,
>> Hope you are all fine.
>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>> 'modern flat'.
>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>> standardized into flats?
>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>> contexts.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Esra.
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Luis Arthur Leite de Vasconcelos
> MSc student at the Federal University of Pernambuco – UFPE – Brazil
> Researcher at the Virtual Reality and Multimedia Research Group – CIn –
> UFPE
> +55 81 86994402
> +55 81 91580443
> skype: josie4401
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2011 15:30:50 +0100
> From: Jean Schneider <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>
> Hello Esra,
>
> Don't take it as an offence, but have you been unable to find a few
> references about that in your local libraries, if not in design, for
> sure in architecture (regarding the organisation of buildings and
> standardisation ?) and in interior architecture (regarding the
> definition of functional spaces?) ? This seems difficult to believe !
>
> Good luck with your research !
>
> Jean
>
> Le 31 oct. 11 à 13:13, esra bici a écrit :
>
> Dear all,
> Hope you are all fine.
> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
> 'modern flat'.
> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
> standardized into flats?
> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
> contexts.
>
> Cheers,
> Esra.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2011 22:40:54 +0800
> From: "CHUA Soo Meng Jude (PLS)" <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>
> That's a very interesting question. I;ve myself always wondered how the "drawing room" came about in the English house, until I was told one day that it is in fact the "withdrawing" room shortened, and it was a room into which the women withdrew when the men were in the living room entertaining guests. But don't take my word for it: best to get this verified.
>
> Jude
> ________________________________________
> From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related research in Design [[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of esra bici [[log in to unmask]]
> Sent: Monday, October 31, 2011 8:13 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>
> Dear all,
> Hope you are all fine.
> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
> 'modern flat'.
> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
> standardized into flats?
> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
> contexts.
>
> Cheers,
> Esra.
> National Institute of Education (Singapore) http://www.nie.edu.sg
>
> DISCLAIMER : The information contained in this email, including any attachments, may contain confidential information.
> This email is intended only for the use of the addressee(s) listed above. Unauthorised sight, dissemination or any other
> use of the information contained in this email is strictly prohibited. If you have received this email by fault, please
> notify the sender and delete it immediately.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2011 16:53:17 +0200
> From: esra bici <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>
> I have. But it has not been a very easy and quick thing to find out.
> Even my architect collegues could not answer immediately.
> I have found some lecture notes of an Architect- professor.
> There are many architecture books that show great illustrations about first
> modern flats but not about the related sociological consequences and the
> origin of the emergence of the functional seperations.
>
> But if I bother the list, please forgive me.
>
> Kind regards,
> Esra.
>
>
> On Mon, Oct 31, 2011 at 4:30 PM, Jean Schneider <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>
>> Hello Esra,
>>
>> Don't take it as an offence, but have you been unable to find a few
>> references about that in your local libraries, if not in design, for sure
>> in architecture (regarding the organisation of buildings and
>> standardisation ?) and in interior architecture (regarding the definition
>> of functional spaces?) ? This seems difficult to believe !
>>
>> Good luck with your research !
>>
>> Jean
>>
>> Le 31 oct. 11 à 13:13, esra bici a écrit :
>>
>>
>> Dear all,
>> Hope you are all fine.
>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>> 'modern flat'.
>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>> standardized into flats?
>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>> contexts.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Esra.
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Esra Bici
> Endüstri Ürünleri Tasarimcisi
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2011 23:20:31 +0800
> From: Terence Love <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>
> Dear Esra,
> My guess is that how you see 'modern' is a not so obvious defining
> characteristic.
> You probably already got there - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apartment
> looks a useful starting point.
> Best wishes,
> terry
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related
> research in Design [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of esra bici
> Sent: Monday, 31 October 2011 10:53 PM
> To: Dr Terence Love
> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>
> I have. But it has not been a very easy and quick thing to find out.
> Even my architect collegues could not answer immediately.
> I have found some lecture notes of an Architect- professor.
> There are many architecture books that show great illustrations about first
> modern flats but not about the related sociological consequences and the
> origin of the emergence of the functional seperations.
>
> But if I bother the list, please forgive me.
>
> Kind regards,
> Esra.
>
>
> On Mon, Oct 31, 2011 at 4:30 PM, Jean Schneider
> <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>
>> Hello Esra,
>>
>> Don't take it as an offence, but have you been unable to find a few
>> references about that in your local libraries, if not in design, for sure
>> in architecture (regarding the organisation of buildings and
>> standardisation ?) and in interior architecture (regarding the definition
>> of functional spaces?) ? This seems difficult to believe !
>>
>> Good luck with your research !
>>
>> Jean
>>
>> Le 31 oct. 11 à 13:13, esra bici a écrit :
>>
>>
>> Dear all,
>> Hope you are all fine.
>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>> 'modern flat'.
>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>> standardized into flats?
>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>> contexts.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Esra.
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Esra Bici
> Endüstri Ürünleri Tasarimcisi
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2011 17:18:23 +0100
> From: Rosan Chow <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Ken’s post on Zotero Group ‘Research Through Design’
>
> Ken is right in pointing out the Zotero ‚Research Through Design’ group
> library as it is now is nothing close to a critical literature review. He
> is however wrong to infer that I have misread Victor’s challenge.
>
>
>
> I would like to ask this forum to point me to a list of annotated
> bibilography on Research Through Design that is publicly available. Until
> then, I do what I can with the help of others.
>
>
>
> Perhaps we should take a moment to reflect on Victor’s request and ask why
> we as a community of academic researchers have failed to deliver
> bibliographies of design literature. Until then, I do what I can with the
> help of others.
>
>
>
> I don’t know who is happy and satisfied with the state of Design Research
> as a field. I see that there is much work to do and we need to get everyone
> involved to try different things besides having deans and professors
> meeting each other at conferences advising doctoral students what they
> should do and not do. Until then, I do what I can with the help of others.
>
>
>
> Join us at Zotero
>
> http://www.zotero.org/groups/research_through_design
>
>
>
> Rosan
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 1 Nov 2011 07:13:42 +1300
> From: "Bill, Amanda" <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>
> Hi Esra,
> Great topic. You might find more success in journals such as Home Cultures, or Urban Studies, or The Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, or even Design History.
> (30 seconds on google scholar)
>
> Best,
> Amanda
>
> On 1/11/11 3:53 AM, "esra bici" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> I have. But it has not been a very easy and quick thing to find out.
> Even my architect collegues could not answer immediately.
> I have found some lecture notes of an Architect- professor.
> There are many architecture books that show great illustrations about first
> modern flats but not about the related sociological consequences and the
> origin of the emergence of the functional seperations.
>
> But if I bother the list, please forgive me.
>
> Kind regards,
> Esra.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2011 14:49:53 -0500
> From: marcella eaton <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>
> This may or may not be of help, but the book "Housing, Substance of Our Cities, European Chronicle 1900-2007", edited/curated by Nasrine Seraji and published by A. & J. Picard, Paris is interesting. There was an exhibition in June of 2007 at the Pavillon de L'Arsenal in Paris. http://www.pavillon-arsenal.com/en/expositions/thema_modele.php?id_exposition=187
>
> A very interesting series of questions! Good luck with your work.
>
> Best,
> Marcella
>
> Marcella Eaton, PhD
> Associate Dean Academic
> Environmental Design Program Chair
> Associate Professor
> Department of Landscape Architecture
> Faculty of Architecture
> University of Manitoba
> Winnipeg, Manitoba
> Canada
> R3T 2N2
>
> 2044747159
> [log in to unmask]
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On 2011-10-31, at 7:13 AM, esra bici wrote:
>
>> Dear all,
>> Hope you are all fine.
>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>> 'modern flat'.
>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>> standardized into flats?
>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>> contexts.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Esra.
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2011 15:26:32 -0400
> From: Gunnar Swanson <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: screens and shoes
>
> Francois,
>
> That was a difficult question for a monday morning but now that the sun is over the yardarm, I'll take a stab at an answer.
>
> As I said, we struggle. And the more modest goals is to help students become people who think rather than teaching them to think. Since I was talking about using the act of making to reinforce thinking, I was thinking specifically about reflection as part of an iterative process. You're going to design a booklet. Instead of opening InDesign and setting up a document, first making a folding dummy means you can reflect on how the size and weight makes a person feel, what position(s) they'd be in when reading, etc. That, in turn, affects a pile of typographic choices. Then making tons of thumbnails (we're thumbnail nazis) means they can meditate on formal and communicative possibilities. In related discussion, we try to bring things back to what all this does from the reader/user/audience's perspective.
>
> (This is slightly beside the point, but I've always been more comfortable trying to imagine real people using stuff. I don't know if it makes any difference if I say "This is the sort of thing Aunt Iona would be reading at her kitchen table and the light there isn't very good and her vision is deteriorating so I should make this type a little bigger" or if I say "The demographic for this piece skews older so it should have bigger than typical type." In both cases, the type ends up bigger so I don't know if it really matters but I think it moves my design in a better direction. Around the time I started thinking and talking about this, I ran across an interesting article by Dana Cuff. "Architects' People" centered on interviews with architects asking them how they thought about the people who would use their building. I highly recommend it.)
>
> So, as was said in earlier posts, there's some tendency to want to make something that looks pretty on screen, hit command-p, and move on. Through the iterations of printing, making mock-ups, or otherwise making things real, a conversation can go on about various issues. Some of them are technical. Some of them are formal. A lot of them are about the various stakeholders and what their interests are. That includes functional stuff like why one version is easier to read than another but another more compelling, contextual stuff like when and where would someone encounter whatever you're designing, and emotional stuff like how does holding this little thing make me feel and how does holding this big thing make me feel. . .
>
> We also try to squeeze in other issues by our choices about the subject or goals of their projects.
>
> I probably haven't approached the "precisely" part and, despite valiant efforts, I don't claim to have made all of my students think about precisely anything, let alone actually teaching them to think about precisely anything.
>
>
> Gunnar
>
> Gunnar Swanson
> [log in to unmask]
> c: +1 252 258 7006
> h: +1 252 754 1980
>
>
>
> On Oct 30, 2011, at 9:19 PM, Francois Nsenga wrote:
>
>> Dear Gunnar
>>
>> Today, Sun, Oct 30, 2011, you wrote:
>>
>> "At ECU, we struggle to help our students become people who make stuff AND
>> think (and who use the way they make stuff in order to think.)"
>>
>> I am curious to learn what precisely you teach your students to think
>> about, and how you go about teaching them to think about it.
>>
>> Regards
>>
>> Francois
>> Montreal
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 31 Oct 2011 21:11:37 +0100
> From: Luke Feast <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Request: Annotated Design Research Bibliography
>
> Hi Rosan and list,
>
> There is a special issue of the journal Visible Language Vol. 36 (2)
> 2002 titled 'An Annotated Design Research Bibliography: by and for the
> design community'.
>
> http://visiblelanguagejournal.com/web/issues/issue/an_annotated_design_research_bibliography_by_and_for_the_design_community
>
> -snip-
> This Annotated Design Research Bibliography brings together a network
> of design scholars to select the most relevant bibliographical
> references for the field of design. The books that appear annotated
> are selected through two analytical approaches: the essentialness of
> the book determined through a design community on-line ranking survey,
> and the discipline distribution through field-keyword analysis.
> Annotations were collected from the volunteer on-line survey
> participants and a more focused community of individuals targeted for
> each particular section including members of the Ph.D. listserv, the
> Ph.D. community at the Institute of Design and its database. The
> project consists of ninety books in three essential areas of design
> study: 1) Philosophy and Theory of Design, 2) Principles and Methods
> of Design Research, 3) Theory and Practice. Interpretations of the
> observations from the data collected from the on-line bibliographic
> survey are also suggestive of the state of design as a discipline.
> -end snip-
>
> The three annotated bibliographies are available here
>
> Philosophy and Theory of Design
> http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/sites/www.lib.uts.edu.au/files/3575_Annotated_Philosophy_and_Theory_of_Design_List2.pdf
>
> Principles and Methods of Design Research
> http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/sites/www.lib.uts.edu.au/files/3575_Annotated_Principals_and_Methods_of_Design_Research_List.pdf
>
> Theory and Practice in Design
> http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/sites/www.lib.uts.edu.au/files/3575_Annotated_Theory_and_Practice_in_Design_Research_List.pdf
>
>
> Regards
> Luke Feast
>
> PhD Candidate
> Faculty of Design
> Swinburne University of Technology
> Australia
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 1 Nov 2011 08:59:00 +1100
> From: Ken Friedman <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Ken’s post on Zotero Group ‘Research Through Design’
>
> Re: Ken’s post on Zotero Group ‘Research Through Design’
>
>
> Rosan,
>
> You wrote, “Ken is right in pointing out the Zotero‚ Research Through
> Design’ group library as it is now is nothing close to a critical
> literature review. He is however wrong to infer that I have misread
> Victor’s challenge.”
>
> With respect to your claim, two points require comment.
>
> First, the book list you’ve posted on Zotero is not an annotated
> bibliography, but rather a list of print resources. An annotated
> bibliography would offer 1) bibliographic citation, 2) author
> background, 3) content or scope of text, 4) outline of the argument, 5)
> description of intended audience, 6) description of research methods, 7)
> conclusions, 8) reliability, 9) special features, 10) discussion of
> relevance or usefulness, 11) thematic or conceptual analysis, 12)
> discussion of strengths and limitations, 13) view or reaction of the
> author of the annotated bibliography. You provide your views and
> reactions, but you give no information about the items in the list.
>
> My comment on your misreading of Victor’s note is not an inference.
> To infer is to derive a conclusion from facts or premises. I drew no
> inferences. I quoted Victor:
>
> “I am not a big fan of lists if the material on the lists has no
> context, no relation between the texts. The basic point of my initial
> post was to argue for a mapping of texts and issues as a way to orient
> old and new researchers so that thought in the design research field can
> develop as it has in other fields where such mapping has occurred. The
> point is not to collect resources but rather to know where and when they
> originated and why.”
>
> The Zotero list does nothing more than collect resources. Victor makes
> a different point: “The point is not to collect resources but rather
> to know where and when they originated and why.”
>
> Yours,
>
> Ken
>
> Professor Ken Friedman, PhD, DSc (hc), FDRS | University Distinguished
> Professor | Dean, Faculty of Design | Swinburne University of Technology
> | Melbourne, Australia | [log in to unmask] | Ph: +61
> 39214 6078 | Faculty
>
> --
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of PHD-DESIGN Digest - 30 Oct 2011 to 31 Oct 2011 (#2011-269)
> *****************************************************************
>

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