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PHD-DESIGN  November 2011

PHD-DESIGN November 2011

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Subject:

Re: PHD-DESIGN Digest - 31 Oct 2011 to 1 Nov 2011 (#2011-270)

From:

Victor Margolin <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related research in Design <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 1 Nov 2011 22:16:19 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (3143 lines)

Dear colleagues:
As I read the posts of Terry and Peter regarding reading lists and bibliographies, I should probably elaborate on my basic point one more time. As an historian, I am interested in how a field develops and how particular texts become significant to the field. The point of mapping a field is to understand how the field has developed and to get a clearer sense of its trajectory into the future. This is a project of critical awareness rather than pragmatic operations. I think that every student, whether undergrad or grad should be exposed to a sequence of historical texts that have contributed to a field's development. Some of those texts will have a bearing on current practice, others won't but all will contribute to socializing students into the profession. If you have never heard of William Morris or if you have not read something by Buckminster Fuller, Gui Bonsiepe, or Herbert Simon, then you have missed something. Critical practitioners are always referencing those who came before them. Given that design is pragmatic, of course, bibliographies related to specific courses and problems are important and necessary. But these do not socialize anyone into a profession or give them a sense of its past and possible future trajectory. Canonical texts crystallize issues, perceptions, and sensibilities. All are important for a designer. Humanities professors and social scientists tend to do this. Perhaps medical educators don't but then again it should be required to know something about the great physicians of the past and what their aspirations for the practice of medicine were. We are too results oriented today and don't think enough about our professional locations within a complex of value arguments. We are there whether we like it or not. No designer can escape William Morris, for example. He and other more recent figures like John Chris Jones loom large and we lose a great deal if we neglect them.
Victor

Victor Margolin
Professor Emeritus of Design History
Department of Art History
University of Illinois, Chicago







On Nov 1, 2011, at 7:00 PM, PHD-DESIGN automatic digest system wrote:

> There are 13 messages totaling 3803 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. texts (5)
>  2. The History of 'Modern Flat'
>  3. Request: Annotated Design Research Bibliography
>  4. Why website displays are not like paper displays (2)
>  5. The shoemaker'c children: designers who produce lousy web pages (3)
>  6. RES: Call for Papers for International Conference on Design Creativity
>     2012
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 22:38:19 -0500
> From:    Victor Margolin <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: texts
> 
> Dear colleagues:
> I would like to add my two cents to the discussion about book lists, bibliographies, and literature maps. What I was calling for is something that exists in all developed fields, a mapping of the significant texts in the field since the time the field began. In philosophy for example, the major texts are positioned in particular times and places where they relate to other texts and to events. In art history, where I wear one hat, there is definitely a sense of the canonical texts, beginning in the 19th century. Art historians understand how their field began, which texts were seminal at different periods, and what the issues of contemporary times are. When a department teaches a course in art historical methods, it uses the same seminal texts that appear in most courses. Consequently, there is some coherence to the field as well as a body of criticism of earlier texts as a way of deconstructing older dominant ideas and making way for new ones. All texts exist in a time and place and were written by someone or someones with a particular raison d'être. in essence, they are part of a field's intellectual history.  Its interesting to note that such a history exists in the field of the history of technology exemplified by the journal Technology and Culture. There was even a book called Technology's Storytellers which historicizes the leading articles in the journal over a period of twenty years or so. In the design research field, as exemplified by this list, there is a lot of talk about texts but not much critique of them. In fact, texts often seem transparent as the discussion focuses on methodology and other topics that people address from their own perspective comparable to a cafe jam session. In Design Discourse, a book I edited in 1989, I included a bibliographic essay of postwar design literature that was grouped by country and issues. It was a foray into intellectual mapping without the full depth of an intellectual history (which we also need). Its a least a start towards what I believe will eventually be essential for the design research field as it matures.
> Victor
> 
> Victor Margolin
> Professor Emeritus of Design History
> Department of Art History
> University of Illinois, Chicago
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Oct 31, 2011, at 7:00 PM, PHD-DESIGN automatic digest system wrote:
> 
>> There are 17 messages totaling 1084 lines in this issue.
>> 
>> Topics of the day:
>> 
>> 1. screens and shoes (2)
>> 2. Books lists vs. bibliographies, annotated bibliographies, and conceptual
>>    maps
>> 3. Why website displays are not like paper displays
>> 4. Cumulus - global association to serve art and design education and
>>    research
>> 5. The shoemaker'c children: designers who produce lousy web pages
>> 6. The History of 'Modern Flat' (8)
>> 7. Ken’s post on Zotero Group ‘Research Through Design’ (2)
>> 8. Request: Annotated Design Research Bibliography
>> 
>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Sun, 30 Oct 2011 21:19:19 -0400
>> From:    Francois Nsenga <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: screens and shoes
>> 
>> Dear Gunnar
>> 
>> Today, Sun, Oct 30, 2011, you wrote:
>> 
>> "At ECU, we struggle to help our students become people who make stuff AND
>> think (and who use the way they make stuff in order to think.)"
>> 
>> I am curious to learn what precisely you teach your students to think
>> about, and how you go about teaching them to think about it.
>> 
>> Regards
>> 
>> Francois
>> Montreal
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 18:18:34 +1100
>> From:    Ken Friedman <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Books lists vs. bibliographies, annotated bibliographies, and conceptual maps
>> 
>> Dear Colleagues,
>> 
>> On June 29, Victor Margolin posted a note headed “Literacy.” Victor
>> draws a clear distinction “between a list of resources and an
>> intellectual history that locates texts in a framework of when they were
>> written, what they responded to, how they addressed what came before
>> them, what effect they had on what came after them, what other texts
>> they relate to, when and where were these other texts produced.”
>> [Victor's original post appears at the end of this note.]
>> 
>> Victor dismisses such projects as the Zotero book list: “I am not a
>> big fan of lists if the material on the lists has no context, no
>> relation between the texts. The basic point of my initial post was to
>> argue for a mapping of texts and issues as a way to orient old and new
>> researchers so that thought in the design research field can develop as
>> it has in other fields where such mapping has occurred. The point is not
>> to collect resources but rather to know where and when they originated
>> and why.” 
>> 
>> It is a misreading to claim that Victor’s note calls for “a
>> bibliography of seminal design literature.” A list without context or
>> commentary is irrelevant to Victor’s concerns. He did not ask for a
>> bibliography, but rather a series of tools such as focused literature
>> review articles and, to a lesser degree, annotated bibliographies.
>> Zotero offers neither.
>> 
>> The problem of this latest list lies in the inability to distinguish
>> between a list, a bibliography, an annotated bibliography, and a
>> literature review.
>> 
>> A bibliography is a structured list of published resources organized in
>> a consistent bibliographic format. This formatting principle makes it
>> easy for everyone using the bibliography to locate and work from the
>> same documents. A proper bibliography uses a specific citation style
>> such as APA, MLA, or one of the two Chicago styles – “notes and
>> bibliography,” or “author-date.” 
>> 
>> A bibliography generally focuses on a single theme or topic, though it
>> may contain subsidiary sections within a larger topic. Most
>> bibliographies are organized alphabetically by the author’s last name.
>> Other principles are possible. For example, a bibliography might be
>> organized chronologically to show the evolution of a field. A
>> bibliography is a resource list. 
>> 
>> But Victor has no interest in yet another resource list. Victor’s
>> challenge calls for: “an intellectual history that locates texts in a
>> framework of when they were written, what they responded to, how they
>> addressed what came before them, what effect they had on what came after
>> them, what other texts they relate to, when and where were these other
>> texts produced.”
>> 
>> While a properly structured bibliography is a step up from a list, even
>> a well-structured bibliography doesn’t fulfill Victor’s goal. There
>> are two ways to move toward Victor’s goal. One might be possibly done
>> as a software-based community project. The other requires a single
>> author or a small team of authors. The first is an annotated
>> bibliography. The other is a literature review.
>> 
>> An annotated bibliography supplies a bibliographic note for each item
>> in a bibliography. This note – the annotation –describes each item
>> with well-structured information. An annotated bibliography generally
>> provides consistent notes that allow the reader to compare and
>> understand the items in relation to one another, taking the first step
>> toward what Victor describes as “a mapping of texts and issues as a
>> way to orient old and new researchers so that thought in the design
>> research field can develop as it has in other fields where such mapping
>> has occurred.”
>> 
>> Those who wish to learn more about how to write a good bibliographic
>> note will find useful guidance on the nature, purposes, and content of
>> an annotated bibliography on the University of New South Wales Learning
>> Center web site:
>> 
>> http://www.lc.unsw.edu.au/onlib/annotated_bib.html
>> 
>> The UNSW site notes that robust notes should contain all or some of the
>> following elements, depending on purpose, word limit, and cited
>> sources:
>> 
>> 1) full bibliographic citation, 2) the background of the author or
>> author, 3) the content or scope of the text, 4) an outline of the main
>> argument, 5) a description of the intended audience, 6) a description of
>> the research methods, if applicable, 7) conclusions, 8) reliability, 9)
>> description of special features that are unique or helpful, such as
>> charts or graphs 10) the relevance or usefulness of the text for
>> research, either for the field in general or, in some cases, the
>> specific research of the author of the annotated bibliography, 11) the
>> way that the text relates to themes or concepts, 12) the strengths and
>> limitations of the text, 13) the view or reaction of the author of the
>> annotated bibliography to the text.
>> 
>> While the UNSW site writes for an audience of students with an emphasis
>> on bibliographic notes written for course work, the outline can be
>> adapted to most annotated bibliographies.
>> 
>> Cornell University has an excellent guide on how to prepare an
>> annotated bibliography:
>> 
>> http://olinuris.library.cornell.edu/ref/research/skill28.htm
>> 
>> Like the UNSW site, the Cornell site calls for consistent, well
>> formatted citations in an appropriate reference style. In concise notes,
>> the author of the bibliography should examine and review the items in
>> the bibliography, 1) summarizing the theme and scope of each
>> publication, 2) evaluating the authority or background of the author of
>> each items, 3) commenting on the intended audience, 4) comparing or
>> contrasting this work with other items cited in the bibliography, and 5)
>> explaining how this work illuminates the bibliography topic.
>> 
>> The Cornell site emphasizes the critical analysis of information
>> sources:
>> 
>> http://olinuris.library.cornell.edu/ref/research/skill26.htm
>> 
>> What Victor’s note really calls for is a series of critical
>> literature reviews. A critical literature review is a conceptual mapping
>> tool, and that is Victor's challenge to the field. I’ll post a note on
>> the nature and purposes of the critical literature review another time.
>> At the moment, I’m in Delft for the IASDR conference. This morning,
>> we’re holding the doctoral colloquium. Some of the best new
>> researchers from around the world present the work they are doing to
>> complete a PhD, with the idea that interaction and consultation with
>> each other and with senior scholars will help them to develop and
>> improve their thesis projects.
>> 
>> Yours,
>> 
>> Ken
>> 
>> Professor Ken Friedman, PhD, DSc (hc), FDRS | University Distinguished
>> Professor | Dean, Faculty of Design | Swinburne University of Technology
>> | Melbourne, Australia | [log in to unmask] | Ph: +61
>> 39214 6078 | Faculty 
>> 
>> --
>> 
>> Victor Margolin wrote:
>> 
>> --snip--
>> 
>> Much has been written on this list since my initial post a few days ago
>> about literature and literacy. Ken amplified some of my points by
>> discussing a field's need for a literature and the importance of knowing
>> the literature and building on it. The discussion has moved to websites
>> and programs to keep track of high volumes of reading material. The
>> point I wish to return to is the function of core reading material in a
>> field's development. In that spirit, I would like to distinguish between
>> a list of resources and an intellectual history that locates texts in a
>> framework of when they were written, what they responded to, how they
>> addressed what came before them, what effect they had on what came after
>> them, what other texts they relate to, when and where were these other
>> texts produced. It is this intellectual history of design studies and
>> design research that a good PhD program should provide so that a student
>> can locate her or his own thinking within a trajectory, as I mentioned
>> in my initial post. As to the gendering of texts, by first locating them
>> within an intellectual history, one can expose the gender implications
>> and patterns within which they exist. There are particular moments when
>> women began to publish texts on design history or design and these
>> moments have increased as many more women have entered the fields of
>> design and design research. I am not a big fan of lists if the material
>> on the lists has no context, no relation between the texts. The basic
>> point of my initial post was to argue for a mapping of texts and issues
>> as a way to orient old and new researchers so that  thought in the
>> design research field can develop as it has in other fields where such
>> mapping has occurred. The point is not to collect resources but rather
>> to know where and when they originated and why.
>> 
>> --snip--
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 09:11:04 +0000
>> From:    marcio rocha <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Why website displays are not like paper displays
>> 
>> Don't forget something important to add to all this information about
>> website and webdesign.
>> 
>> The variety and limitations of the different users.
>> People with especial needs, blind, movements limitation, cognitive
>> limitations, and so on.
>> Put all together, and work with web design has been a huge challenge for
>> everyone which
>> need to work with web design in a high level of quality.
>> 
>> Marcio Rocha
>> 
>> 
>> On Sun, Oct 30, 2011 at 4:50 PM, Don Norman <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>>> Gunnar said, and i quote:
>>> 
>>> "Websites are not like paper displays. It's probably a mistake to think
>>> that websites are like websites, however."
>>> 
>>> Brilliant
>>> 
>>> Don
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> Marcio Rocha
>> 
>> Transtechnology Research
>> University of Plymouth, UK
>> http://trans-techresearch.net/researchers/marcio-rocha
>> 
>> +0 7553 614185
>> 
>> Federal University of Brazil
>> Visual Arts Faculty
>> Graphic design Department
>> www.fav.ufg.br
>> www.ufg.br
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:44:29 +0000
>> From:    Salmi Eija <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Cumulus - global association to serve art and design education and research
>> 
>> Dear All PhD-Design Colleagues,
>> 
>> thanks for Marcio for informing all about Cumulus = Cumulus International Association of Universities and Colleges of Art, Design and Media -
>> 
>> www.cumulusassociation.org
>> 
>> What is Cumulus?
>> ========================
>> 
>> Cumulus is a platform for partnership in art, design and media education and research. 
>> Cumulus was founded as a network in 1990 by the Royal College of Art in London and the University of Art and Design Helsinki (Finland).
>> It consisted in the next phase of six universities from Europe and was happy to e.g. to be supported by European Union Erasmus programme of the time.
>> Over the years the interest towards Cumulus grew and some Erasmus networks merged with Cumulus. In 2001, Cumulus started to be together 
>> in the form of an association but in a very unique way - trying to avoid too much administration and letting people to gather together under its umbrella the way people want.
>> Today Cumulus is 176 institutional members from 44 countries. Cumulus does not seek members for money and is fully non-profit. It can reach all its close to 200.000 students and
>> many thousands of people working as academics and staff. 
>> 
>> What Cumulus does?
>> ========================
>> 
>> It is an umbrella for people to be together like this PhD-list.  As a standard form for Cumulus members to share, transfer knowledge and best plus worst practices is to meet
>> during the conferences under Cumulus umbrella hosted  by its member institutions two times a year. Some of them are more towards research, some of them less but almost all do include a
>> research part in the programme and through a CfP.  There are also content specific Cumulus working groups - like Visual Communication, Sustainability Working group, Leadership and Strategy and so on... and they do meet normally during the conferences. 
>> 
>> Cumulus members can also organize events marketed through Cumulus site. Also, other events that are organized under Cumulus umbrella are done - like
>> in 2012 alongside the two main conferences; Helsinki Finland World Capital  Year event in May 2012 and Santiago Chile November 2012, there will be one with Hermitage and Cumulus March 2012 and October with the Russian Designers Association and Cumulus and so on. Cumulus has also job section in its site and is open what the members do need. Partners do many collaborate among themselves as they wish - e.g. mobility, projects together,  joint research projects etc. Cumulus also organizes exhibitions as some examples in Louvre Paris 2002  and 2010 in Shanghai celebrating Cumulus 20 years anniversary being part of World Expo 2010 year.  Cumulus Executive Board is also very active by organizing events and activities under the Cumulus umbrella. 
>> 
>> Cumulus has partnerships for instance with the American designer´s association AIGA and some more in the professional field are to come; European League of the Institutes of the Arts, Cumulus is recognized by Unesco,  partnership with US accreditation institution NASAD, With the European Union OHIM agency in Alicante Spain responsible for registering trademarks and designs, Desis  Network for Social Innovation and Sustainability, Cumulus  has declared Kyoto Design Declaration in 2008 that Cumulus Green is an award prized every now and then and many more good things to serve the whole of art, design and  media. The secretariat of Cumulus is according to the decision of Cumulus hosted by its member institution and it is taken care by the Aalto University School of Art and Design in Finland.
>> 
>> Go and see  -  www.cumulusassociation.org
>> 
>> Next main conferences in 2012
>> 
>> Helsinki Finland 23-26 May 2012 Aalto University School of Art and Design - Northern World Mandate - Cumulushelsinki2012.org/
>> Santiago Chile 14 - 17 November 2012 Santiago, Chile Instituto Profesional DuocUC http://www.duoc.cl/cumulus2012/
>> 
>> If you get interested just please email to us;
>> 
>> [log in to unmask]
>> [log in to unmask]
>> Christian Guellerin; [log in to unmask] - Cumulus President Nantes France
>> 
>> Best, 
>> 
>> Eija & Justyna
>> 
>> Eija Salmi (mrs)
>> Director International Affairs Aalto University School of Art and Design 
>> Secretary General  
>> Cumulus International Association of Universities and Colleges of Art, Design and Media
>> www.cumulusassociation.org
>> http://taik.aalto.fi/en/
>> www.aalto.fi
>> 
>> Mailing address: PO BOX 31000, 00076 Aalto, Finland
>> Visiting address: Hämeentie 135 C 000560 Helsinki
>> tel. +358947030534
>> fax. + 358947030595
>> 
>> "Cumulus is the only global association representing art, design and media education in the world. It was founded in 1990 and has today 176 prominent members from 44 countries".
>> 
>> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related research in Design [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Marcio Dupont
>> Sent: 30. lokakuuta 2011 2:10
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Cumulus - global association to serve art and design education and research
>> 
>> Hi friends
>> 
>> Just found this interesting association, Cumulus, the only global association to serve art and design education and research.
>> 
>> http://www.cumulusassociation.org/home
>> 
>> Best!
>> 
>> *Marcio Dupont Caballero  de Carranza*
>> Industrial Designer and Sustainability Analyst
>> 
>> Linkedin <http://br.linkedin.com/in/marciodupont>
>> Sustainable Design Blog <http://marciodupont.blogspot.com/>
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:35:18 +0000
>> From:    Vicky Teinaki <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The shoemaker'c children: designers who produce lousy web pages
>> 
>> Hi all,
>> 
>> I've been waiting for someone to take the web-design-in-large-orgs perspective on this, it hasn't happened so I guess I'll have to do it. 
>> 
>> Sure, the site isn't that great, but to go to the lengths to suggest one shouldn't study there? For having an old (the technologies and archive trawls suggest it hasn't changed since the mid noughties) website? 
>> 
>> It's one thing for a consultant to criticise a site, another to actually work on a site redev and have to push any changes through multiple levels of bureaucracy and programme name changes (yes, I know of sites stuck in beta for years while the design discipline names keep changing). 
>> 
>> Were this a discussion about what should and should not be discussed on a design education website, I'd feel this was an appropriate forum. However, as it stands, I'd have much rather seen web design criticism and the like happen in a forum such as the IXDA (Interaction Designers Association). http://www.ixda.org/ (For those interested in things web-devvy, it has free membership and highly recommended, even if Twitter and FB mean it doesn't have quite as many posts as it used to). I know at least one member occasionally chimes in with his perspective from working on the US military site: that's a real eye opener in terms of both levels of sign-off and their design constraints.
>> 
>> As it stands, this argument reminds me much of the Dustin Curtis vs American Airlines website story, as chronicled on Fast Company: http://www.fastcompany.com/blog/cliff-kuang/design-innovation/how-self-defeating-corporate-design-process-one-designer-finds-ou
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 14:13:33 +0200
>> From:    esra bici <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> Dear all,
>> Hope you are all fine.
>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>> 'modern flat'.
>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>> standardized into flats?
>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>> contexts.
>> 
>> Cheers,
>> Esra.
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:12:09 -0300
>> From:    luis vasconcelos <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> dear, esra,
>> although it is not much, here goes something to begin with:
>> http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-12483492
>> maybe this lucy worsley can be a good source for your research.
>> kind regards,
>> arthur.
>> 
>> On Mon, Oct 31, 2011 at 9:13 AM, esra bici <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>>> Dear all,
>>> Hope you are all fine.
>>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>>> 'modern flat'.
>>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>>> standardized into flats?
>>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>>> contexts.
>>> 
>>> Cheers,
>>> Esra.
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> Luis Arthur Leite de Vasconcelos
>> MSc student at the Federal University of Pernambuco – UFPE – Brazil
>> Researcher at the Virtual Reality and Multimedia Research Group – CIn –
>> UFPE
>> +55 81 86994402
>> +55 81 91580443
>> skype: josie4401
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 15:30:50 +0100
>> From:    Jean Schneider <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> Hello Esra,
>> 
>> Don't take it as an offence, but have you been unable to find a few  
>> references about that in your local libraries, if not in design, for  
>> sure in architecture (regarding the organisation of buildings and  
>> standardisation ?)  and in interior architecture (regarding the  
>> definition of functional spaces?) ? This seems difficult to believe !
>> 
>> Good luck with your research !
>> 
>> Jean
>> 
>> Le 31 oct. 11 à 13:13, esra bici a écrit :
>> 
>> Dear all,
>> Hope you are all fine.
>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>> 'modern flat'.
>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>> standardized into flats?
>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>> contexts.
>> 
>> Cheers,
>> Esra.
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 22:40:54 +0800
>> From:    "CHUA Soo Meng Jude (PLS)" <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> That's a very interesting question.  I;ve myself always wondered how the "drawing room" came about in the English house, until I was told one day that it is in fact the "withdrawing" room shortened, and it was a room into which the women withdrew when the men were in the living room entertaining guests.  But don't take my word for it: best to get this verified.
>> 
>> Jude
>> ________________________________________
>> From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related research in Design [[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of esra bici [[log in to unmask]]
>> Sent: Monday, October 31, 2011 8:13 PM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> Dear all,
>> Hope you are all fine.
>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>> 'modern flat'.
>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>> standardized into flats?
>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>> contexts.
>> 
>> Cheers,
>> Esra.
>> National Institute of Education (Singapore) http://www.nie.edu.sg
>> 
>> DISCLAIMER : The information contained in this email, including any attachments, may contain confidential information. 
>> This email is intended only for the use of the addressee(s) listed above. Unauthorised sight, dissemination or any other 
>> use of the information contained in this email is strictly prohibited. If you have received this email by fault, please 
>> notify the sender and delete it immediately.
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 16:53:17 +0200
>> From:    esra bici <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> I have. But it has not been a very easy and quick thing to find out.
>> Even my architect collegues could not answer immediately.
>> I have found some lecture notes of an Architect- professor.
>> There are many architecture books that show great illustrations about first
>> modern flats but not about the related sociological consequences and the
>> origin of the emergence of the functional seperations.
>> 
>> But if I bother the list, please forgive me.
>> 
>> Kind regards,
>> Esra.
>> 
>> 
>> On Mon, Oct 31, 2011 at 4:30 PM, Jean Schneider <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>> 
>>> Hello Esra,
>>> 
>>> Don't take it as an offence, but have you been unable to find a few
>>> references about that in your local libraries, if not in design, for sure
>>> in architecture (regarding the organisation of buildings and
>>> standardisation ?)  and in interior architecture (regarding the definition
>>> of functional spaces?) ? This seems difficult to believe !
>>> 
>>> Good luck with your research !
>>> 
>>> Jean
>>> 
>>> Le 31 oct. 11 à 13:13, esra bici a écrit :
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Dear all,
>>> Hope you are all fine.
>>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>>> 'modern flat'.
>>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>>> standardized into flats?
>>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>>> contexts.
>>> 
>>> Cheers,
>>> Esra.
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> Esra Bici
>> Endüstri Ürünleri Tasarimcisi
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 23:20:31 +0800
>> From:    Terence Love <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> Dear Esra,
>> My guess is that how you see 'modern' is a not so obvious  defining
>> characteristic.
>> You probably already got there  -   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apartment
>> looks a useful starting point. 
>> Best wishes,
>> terry
>> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related
>> research in Design [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of esra bici
>> Sent: Monday, 31 October 2011 10:53 PM
>> To: Dr Terence Love
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> I have. But it has not been a very easy and quick thing to find out.
>> Even my architect collegues could not answer immediately.
>> I have found some lecture notes of an Architect- professor.
>> There are many architecture books that show great illustrations about first
>> modern flats but not about the related sociological consequences and the
>> origin of the emergence of the functional seperations.
>> 
>> But if I bother the list, please forgive me.
>> 
>> Kind regards,
>> Esra.
>> 
>> 
>> On Mon, Oct 31, 2011 at 4:30 PM, Jean Schneider
>> <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>> 
>>> Hello Esra,
>>> 
>>> Don't take it as an offence, but have you been unable to find a few
>>> references about that in your local libraries, if not in design, for sure
>>> in architecture (regarding the organisation of buildings and
>>> standardisation ?)  and in interior architecture (regarding the definition
>>> of functional spaces?) ? This seems difficult to believe !
>>> 
>>> Good luck with your research !
>>> 
>>> Jean
>>> 
>>> Le 31 oct. 11 à 13:13, esra bici a écrit :
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Dear all,
>>> Hope you are all fine.
>>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>>> 'modern flat'.
>>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>>> standardized into flats?
>>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>>> contexts.
>>> 
>>> Cheers,
>>> Esra.
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> Esra Bici
>> Endüstri Ürünleri Tasarimcisi
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 17:18:23 +0100
>> From:    Rosan Chow <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Ken’s post on Zotero Group ‘Research Through Design’
>> 
>> Ken is right in pointing out the Zotero ‚Research Through Design’ group
>> library as it is now is nothing close to a critical literature review.  He
>> is however wrong to infer that I have misread Victor’s challenge.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> I would like to ask this forum to point me to a list of annotated
>> bibilography on Research Through Design that is publicly available.  Until
>> then, I do what I can with the help of others.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Perhaps we should take a moment to reflect on Victor’s request and ask why
>> we as a community of academic researchers have failed to deliver
>> bibliographies of design literature.  Until then, I do what I can with the
>> help of others.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> I don’t know who is happy and satisfied with the state of Design Research
>> as a field. I see that there is much work to do and we need to get everyone
>> involved to try different things besides having deans and professors
>> meeting each other at conferences advising doctoral students what they
>> should do and not do. Until then, I do what I can with the help of others.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Join us at Zotero
>> 
>> http://www.zotero.org/groups/research_through_design
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Rosan
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 07:13:42 +1300
>> From:    "Bill, Amanda" <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> Hi Esra,
>> Great topic. You might find more success in journals such as Home Cultures, or Urban Studies, or The Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, or even Design History.
>> (30 seconds on google scholar)
>> 
>> Best,
>> Amanda
>> 
>> On 1/11/11 3:53 AM, "esra bici" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> I have. But it has not been a very easy and quick thing to find out.
>> Even my architect collegues could not answer immediately.
>> I have found some lecture notes of an Architect- professor.
>> There are many architecture books that show great illustrations about first
>> modern flats but not about the related sociological consequences and the
>> origin of the emergence of the functional seperations.
>> 
>> But if I bother the list, please forgive me.
>> 
>> Kind regards,
>> Esra.
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 14:49:53 -0500
>> From:    marcella eaton <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> This may or may not be of help, but the book "Housing, Substance of Our Cities, European Chronicle 1900-2007", edited/curated by Nasrine Seraji and published by A. & J. Picard, Paris is interesting. There was an exhibition in June of 2007 at the Pavillon de L'Arsenal in Paris.  http://www.pavillon-arsenal.com/en/expositions/thema_modele.php?id_exposition=187
>> 
>> A very interesting series of questions! Good luck with your work.
>> 
>> Best,
>> Marcella
>> 
>> Marcella Eaton, PhD
>> Associate Dean Academic
>> Environmental Design Program Chair
>> Associate Professor
>> Department of Landscape Architecture
>> Faculty of Architecture
>> University of Manitoba
>> Winnipeg, Manitoba
>> Canada
>> R3T 2N2
>> 
>> 2044747159
>> [log in to unmask]
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On 2011-10-31, at 7:13 AM, esra bici wrote:
>> 
>>> Dear all,
>>> Hope you are all fine.
>>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>>> 'modern flat'.
>>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>>> standardized into flats?
>>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>>> contexts.
>>> 
>>> Cheers,
>>> Esra.
>>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 15:26:32 -0400
>> From:    Gunnar Swanson <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: screens and shoes
>> 
>> Francois,
>> 
>> That was a difficult question for a monday morning but now that the sun is over the yardarm, I'll take a stab at an answer. 
>> 
>> As I said, we struggle. And the more modest goals is to help students become people who think rather than teaching them to think. Since I was talking about using the act of making to reinforce thinking, I was thinking specifically about reflection as part of an iterative process. You're going to design a booklet. Instead of opening InDesign and setting up a document, first making a folding dummy means you can reflect on how the size and weight makes a person feel, what position(s) they'd be in when reading, etc. That, in turn, affects a pile of typographic choices. Then making tons of thumbnails (we're thumbnail nazis) means they can meditate on formal and communicative possibilities. In related discussion, we try to bring things back to what all this does from the reader/user/audience's perspective.
>> 
>> (This is slightly beside the point, but I've always been more comfortable trying to imagine real people using stuff. I don't know if it makes any difference if I say "This is the sort of thing Aunt Iona would be reading at her kitchen table and  the light there isn't very good and her vision is deteriorating so I should make this type a little bigger" or if I say "The demographic for this piece skews older so it should have bigger than typical type." In both cases, the type ends up bigger so I don't know if it really matters but I think it moves my design in a better direction. Around the time I started thinking and talking about this, I ran across an interesting article by Dana Cuff. "Architects' People" centered on interviews with architects asking them how they thought about the people who would use their building. I highly recommend it.)
>> 
>> So, as was said in earlier posts, there's some tendency to want to make something that looks pretty on screen, hit command-p, and move on. Through the iterations of printing, making mock-ups, or otherwise making things real, a conversation can go on about various issues. Some of them are technical. Some of them are formal. A lot of them are about the various stakeholders and what their interests are. That includes functional stuff like why one version is easier to read than another but another more compelling, contextual stuff like when and where would someone encounter whatever you're designing, and emotional stuff like how does holding this little thing make me feel and how does holding this big thing make me feel. . .
>> 
>> We also try to squeeze in other issues by our choices about the subject or goals of their projects.
>> 
>> I probably haven't approached the "precisely" part and, despite valiant efforts, I don't claim to have made all of my students think about precisely anything, let alone actually teaching them to think about precisely anything.
>> 
>> 
>> Gunnar
>> 
>> Gunnar Swanson
>> [log in to unmask]
>> c: +1 252 258 7006
>> h: +1 252 754 1980
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Oct 30, 2011, at 9:19 PM, Francois Nsenga wrote:
>> 
>>> Dear Gunnar
>>> 
>>> Today, Sun, Oct 30, 2011, you wrote:
>>> 
>>> "At ECU, we struggle to help our students become people who make stuff AND
>>> think (and who use the way they make stuff in order to think.)"
>>> 
>>> I am curious to learn what precisely you teach your students to think
>>> about, and how you go about teaching them to think about it.
>>> 
>>> Regards
>>> 
>>> Francois
>>> Montreal
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 21:11:37 +0100
>> From:    Luke Feast <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Request: Annotated Design Research Bibliography
>> 
>> Hi Rosan and list,
>> 
>> There is a special issue of the journal Visible Language Vol. 36 (2)
>> 2002 titled 'An Annotated Design Research Bibliography: by and for the
>> design community'.
>> 
>> http://visiblelanguagejournal.com/web/issues/issue/an_annotated_design_research_bibliography_by_and_for_the_design_community
>> 
>> -snip-
>> This Annotated Design Research Bibliography brings together a network
>> of design scholars to select the most relevant bibliographical
>> references for the field of design. The books that appear annotated
>> are selected through two analytical approaches: the essentialness of
>> the book determined through a design community on-line ranking survey,
>> and the discipline distribution through field-keyword analysis.
>> Annotations were collected from the volunteer on-line survey
>> participants and a more focused community of individuals targeted for
>> each particular section including members of the Ph.D. listserv, the
>> Ph.D. community at the Institute of Design and its database. The
>> project consists of ninety books in three essential areas of design
>> study: 1) Philosophy and Theory of Design, 2) Principles and Methods
>> of Design Research, 3) Theory and Practice. Interpretations of the
>> observations from the data collected from the on-line bibliographic
>> survey are also suggestive of the state of design as a discipline.
>> -end snip-
>> 
>> The three annotated bibliographies are available here
>> 
>> Philosophy and Theory of Design
>> http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/sites/www.lib.uts.edu.au/files/3575_Annotated_Philosophy_and_Theory_of_Design_List2.pdf
>> 
>> Principles and Methods of Design Research
>> http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/sites/www.lib.uts.edu.au/files/3575_Annotated_Principals_and_Methods_of_Design_Research_List.pdf
>> 
>> Theory and Practice in Design
>> http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/sites/www.lib.uts.edu.au/files/3575_Annotated_Theory_and_Practice_in_Design_Research_List.pdf
>> 
>> 
>> Regards
>> Luke Feast
>> 
>> PhD Candidate
>> Faculty of Design
>> Swinburne University of Technology
>> Australia
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 08:59:00 +1100
>> From:    Ken Friedman <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Ken’s post on Zotero Group ‘Research Through Design’
>> 
>> Re: Ken’s post on Zotero Group ‘Research Through Design’
>> 
>> 
>> Rosan,
>> 
>> You wrote, “Ken is right in pointing out the Zotero‚ Research Through
>> Design’ group library as it is now is nothing close to a critical
>> literature review.  He is however wrong to infer that I have misread
>> Victor’s challenge.”
>> 
>> With respect to your claim, two points require comment.
>> 
>> First, the book list you’ve posted on Zotero is not an annotated
>> bibliography, but rather a list of print resources. An annotated
>> bibliography would offer 1) bibliographic citation, 2) author
>> background, 3) content or scope of text, 4) outline of the argument, 5)
>> description of intended audience, 6) description of research methods, 7)
>> conclusions, 8) reliability, 9) special features, 10) discussion of
>> relevance or usefulness, 11) thematic or conceptual analysis, 12)
>> discussion of strengths and limitations, 13) view or reaction of the
>> author of the annotated bibliography. You provide your views and
>> reactions, but you give no information about the items in the list.
>> 
>> My comment on your misreading of Victor’s note is not an inference.
>> To infer is to derive a conclusion from facts or premises. I drew no
>> inferences. I quoted Victor:
>> 
>> “I am not a big fan of lists if the material on the lists has no
>> context, no relation between the texts. The basic point of my initial
>> post was to argue for a mapping of texts and issues as a way to orient
>> old and new researchers so that thought in the design research field can
>> develop as it has in other fields where such mapping has occurred. The
>> point is not to collect resources but rather to know where and when they
>> originated and why.” 
>> 
>> The Zotero list does nothing more than collect resources. Victor makes
>> a different point: “The point is not to collect resources but rather
>> to know where and when they originated and why.”
>> 
>> Yours,
>> 
>> Ken
>> 
>> Professor Ken Friedman, PhD, DSc (hc), FDRS | University Distinguished
>> Professor | Dean, Faculty of Design | Swinburne University of Technology
>> | Melbourne, Australia | [log in to unmask] | Ph: +61
>> 39214 6078 | Faculty 
>> 
>> --
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> End of PHD-DESIGN Digest - 30 Oct 2011 to 31 Oct 2011 (#2011-269)
>> *****************************************************************
>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 13:35:49 +0800
> From:    Terence Love <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: texts
> 
> Dear Victor, Ken and all,
> 
> The task of 'mapping the significant texts in design research and theory'
> has several dimensions. One of the first is 'what to include and what to
> exclude'. 
> 
> To avoid including unhelpful or false material  depends on critical review
> of each text in terms of the validity of its authors' use of concepts and
> reasoning. This is particularly important in terms of authors' reasoning
> about and use of core concepts, e.g. relating to 'designs' (noun) and the
> activity of designing.
> 
> Here there is a problem across design fields. The field of design texts is
> characterised by being conceptually and analytically superficial. Very few
> texts can  stand up to critical review of their concepts and reasoning. This
> is as true for material from respected researchers such as Simon  and Newell
> as it is for writings of experienced design practitioners and new design
> research PhD graduates. When viewed critically in terms of concepts and
> reasoning, most publications that might otherwise form part of a body of
> theoretical foundation  material or an historical review of the field fall
> into the 'publications to exclude' group. 
> 
> With hindsight, since I published my own historical reviews of design texts
> defining 'design' and 'design process' in the 1990s, it has become apparent
> to me that a core problem across the design literature has been the
> widespread privileging of the definition of  the concept of design as a
> verb. I have not yet found a definition of  design as a verb that stands up
> to critical review. 
> 
> Since realising this and moving to a theoretical foundation in which design
> is primarily defined in terms of 'design' as a noun (i.e. a design), I've
> found it much easier to develop larger and more justifiable bodies of design
> theory that are conceptually robust. (In this noun-based design theory
> context, the activity of design (verb)  then become  simply to 'create a
> design' and a designer is simply someone or something that creates designs.)
> I realise that for many this contradicts the purist idea that it is the
> activity that should be used as the basis for definitions.  In the case of
> design, the evidence indicates the opposite. There seems no obvious evidence
> that defining design as an activity has resulted in any coherent
> cross-disciplinary basis for a body of design theory that stands up to
> critical review. In contrast, using the noun form of design appears to
> provide  a robust basis for design theory.
> 
> An underlying problem with creating an historical review of the literature
> relating to design is that predominately and historically  it has been
> based not only  on flawed conceptualisation and reasoning, but these have in
> turn been based on conceptually  weak verb-based definitions of design as an
> activity. Together these make it problematic  to build a coherent
> intellectual mapping of the development of well-reasoned  design theory.
> 
> My own attempts at historical reviews of the design literature relating to
> the history of definitions of  concepts of 'design' and 'design process'
> are:
> 
> Love, T. (1997). Annotated Bibliography of Definitions of Design 1962-1995.
> from Social, Environmental and Ethical Factors in Engineering Design Theory:
> a Post-positivist Approach. Unpublished PhD thesis, University of Western
> Australia, Perth.
> 
> Love, T. (1997). Annotated Bibliography of Definitions of Design Process
> 1962-1995) from Social, Environmental and Ethical Factors in Engineering
> Design Theory: a Post-positivist Approach. Unpublished PhD thesis,
> University of Western Australia, Perth.
> 
> Both are available  with related publications at
> http://www.love.com.au/PublicationsTLminisite/publications.htm 
> 
> Best wishes,
> Terry
> ____________________
> Dr. Terence Love, FDRS, AMIMechE, PMACM, MISI 
> Mob: 0434 975 848, Fax +61(0)8 9305 7629, [log in to unmask]
> 
> Senior Lecturer,  Design
> Researcher, Social Program Evaluation Research Unit
> Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia
> 
> Senior Lecturer, Dept of Design
> Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia
> 
> Director, Design Out Crime Research Centre
> 
> Honorary Fellow, Institute of Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Development
> Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
> ____________________
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related
> research in Design [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Victor
> Margolin
> Sent: Tuesday, 1 November 2011 11:38 AM
> To: Dr Terence Love
> Subject: texts
> 
> Dear colleagues:
> I would like to add my two cents to the discussion about book lists,
> bibliographies, and literature maps. What I was calling for is something
> that exists in all developed fields, a mapping of the significant texts in
> the field since the time the field began. In philosophy for example, the
> major texts are positioned in particular times and places where they relate
> to other texts and to events. In art history, where I wear one hat, there is
> definitely a sense of the canonical texts, beginning in the 19th century.
> Art historians understand how their field began, which texts were seminal at
> different periods, and what the issues of contemporary times are. When a
> department teaches a course in art historical methods, it uses the same
> seminal texts that appear in most courses. Consequently, there is some
> coherence to the field as well as a body of criticism of earlier texts as a
> way of deconstructing older dominant ideas and making way for new ones. All
> texts exist in a time and place and were written by someone or someones with
> a particular raison d'être. in essence, they are part of a field's
> intellectual history.  Its interesting to note that such a history exists in
> the field of the history of technology exemplified by the journal Technology
> and Culture. There was even a book called Technology's Storytellers which
> historicizes the leading articles in the journal over a period of twenty
> years or so. In the design research field, as exemplified by this list,
> there is a lot of talk about texts but not much critique of them. In fact,
> texts often seem transparent as the discussion focuses on methodology and
> other topics that people address from their own perspective comparable to a
> cafe jam session. In Design Discourse, a book I edited in 1989, I included a
> bibliographic essay of postwar design literature that was grouped by country
> and issues. It was a foray into intellectual mapping without the full depth
> of an intellectual history (which we also need). Its a least a start towards
> what I believe will eventually be essential for the design research field as
> it matures.
> Victor
> 
> Victor Margolin
> Professor Emeritus of Design History
> Department of Art History
> University of Illinois, Chicago
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Oct 31, 2011, at 7:00 PM, PHD-DESIGN automatic digest system wrote:
> 
>> There are 17 messages totaling 1084 lines in this issue.
>> 
>> Topics of the day:
>> 
>> 1. screens and shoes (2)
>> 2. Books lists vs. bibliographies, annotated bibliographies, and
> conceptual
>>    maps
>> 3. Why website displays are not like paper displays
>> 4. Cumulus - global association to serve art and design education and
>>    research
>> 5. The shoemaker'c children: designers who produce lousy web pages
>> 6. The History of 'Modern Flat' (8)
>> 7. Ken’s post on Zotero Group ‘Research Through Design’ (2)
>> 8. Request: Annotated Design Research Bibliography
>> 
>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Sun, 30 Oct 2011 21:19:19 -0400
>> From:    Francois Nsenga <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: screens and shoes
>> 
>> Dear Gunnar
>> 
>> Today, Sun, Oct 30, 2011, you wrote:
>> 
>> "At ECU, we struggle to help our students become people who make stuff AND
>> think (and who use the way they make stuff in order to think.)"
>> 
>> I am curious to learn what precisely you teach your students to think
>> about, and how you go about teaching them to think about it.
>> 
>> Regards
>> 
>> Francois
>> Montreal
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 18:18:34 +1100
>> From:    Ken Friedman <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Books lists vs. bibliographies, annotated bibliographies, and
> conceptual maps
>> 
>> Dear Colleagues,
>> 
>> On June 29, Victor Margolin posted a note headed “Literacy.” Victor
>> draws a clear distinction “between a list of resources and an
>> intellectual history that locates texts in a framework of when they were
>> written, what they responded to, how they addressed what came before
>> them, what effect they had on what came after them, what other texts
>> they relate to, when and where were these other texts produced.”
>> [Victor's original post appears at the end of this note.]
>> 
>> Victor dismisses such projects as the Zotero book list: “I am not a
>> big fan of lists if the material on the lists has no context, no
>> relation between the texts. The basic point of my initial post was to
>> argue for a mapping of texts and issues as a way to orient old and new
>> researchers so that thought in the design research field can develop as
>> it has in other fields where such mapping has occurred. The point is not
>> to collect resources but rather to know where and when they originated
>> and why.” 
>> 
>> It is a misreading to claim that Victor’s note calls for “a
>> bibliography of seminal design literature.” A list without context or
>> commentary is irrelevant to Victor’s concerns. He did not ask for a
>> bibliography, but rather a series of tools such as focused literature
>> review articles and, to a lesser degree, annotated bibliographies.
>> Zotero offers neither.
>> 
>> The problem of this latest list lies in the inability to distinguish
>> between a list, a bibliography, an annotated bibliography, and a
>> literature review.
>> 
>> A bibliography is a structured list of published resources organized in
>> a consistent bibliographic format. This formatting principle makes it
>> easy for everyone using the bibliography to locate and work from the
>> same documents. A proper bibliography uses a specific citation style
>> such as APA, MLA, or one of the two Chicago styles – “notes and
>> bibliography,” or “author-date.” 
>> 
>> A bibliography generally focuses on a single theme or topic, though it
>> may contain subsidiary sections within a larger topic. Most
>> bibliographies are organized alphabetically by the author’s last name.
>> Other principles are possible. For example, a bibliography might be
>> organized chronologically to show the evolution of a field. A
>> bibliography is a resource list. 
>> 
>> But Victor has no interest in yet another resource list. Victor’s
>> challenge calls for: “an intellectual history that locates texts in a
>> framework of when they were written, what they responded to, how they
>> addressed what came before them, what effect they had on what came after
>> them, what other texts they relate to, when and where were these other
>> texts produced.”
>> 
>> While a properly structured bibliography is a step up from a list, even
>> a well-structured bibliography doesn’t fulfill Victor’s goal. There
>> are two ways to move toward Victor’s goal. One might be possibly done
>> as a software-based community project. The other requires a single
>> author or a small team of authors. The first is an annotated
>> bibliography. The other is a literature review.
>> 
>> An annotated bibliography supplies a bibliographic note for each item
>> in a bibliography. This note – the annotation –describes each item
>> with well-structured information. An annotated bibliography generally
>> provides consistent notes that allow the reader to compare and
>> understand the items in relation to one another, taking the first step
>> toward what Victor describes as “a mapping of texts and issues as a
>> way to orient old and new researchers so that thought in the design
>> research field can develop as it has in other fields where such mapping
>> has occurred.”
>> 
>> Those who wish to learn more about how to write a good bibliographic
>> note will find useful guidance on the nature, purposes, and content of
>> an annotated bibliography on the University of New South Wales Learning
>> Center web site:
>> 
>> http://www.lc.unsw.edu.au/onlib/annotated_bib.html
>> 
>> The UNSW site notes that robust notes should contain all or some of the
>> following elements, depending on purpose, word limit, and cited
>> sources:
>> 
>> 1) full bibliographic citation, 2) the background of the author or
>> author, 3) the content or scope of the text, 4) an outline of the main
>> argument, 5) a description of the intended audience, 6) a description of
>> the research methods, if applicable, 7) conclusions, 8) reliability, 9)
>> description of special features that are unique or helpful, such as
>> charts or graphs 10) the relevance or usefulness of the text for
>> research, either for the field in general or, in some cases, the
>> specific research of the author of the annotated bibliography, 11) the
>> way that the text relates to themes or concepts, 12) the strengths and
>> limitations of the text, 13) the view or reaction of the author of the
>> annotated bibliography to the text.
>> 
>> While the UNSW site writes for an audience of students with an emphasis
>> on bibliographic notes written for course work, the outline can be
>> adapted to most annotated bibliographies.
>> 
>> Cornell University has an excellent guide on how to prepare an
>> annotated bibliography:
>> 
>> http://olinuris.library.cornell.edu/ref/research/skill28.htm
>> 
>> Like the UNSW site, the Cornell site calls for consistent, well
>> formatted citations in an appropriate reference style. In concise notes,
>> the author of the bibliography should examine and review the items in
>> the bibliography, 1) summarizing the theme and scope of each
>> publication, 2) evaluating the authority or background of the author of
>> each items, 3) commenting on the intended audience, 4) comparing or
>> contrasting this work with other items cited in the bibliography, and 5)
>> explaining how this work illuminates the bibliography topic.
>> 
>> The Cornell site emphasizes the critical analysis of information
>> sources:
>> 
>> http://olinuris.library.cornell.edu/ref/research/skill26.htm
>> 
>> What Victor’s note really calls for is a series of critical
>> literature reviews. A critical literature review is a conceptual mapping
>> tool, and that is Victor's challenge to the field. I’ll post a note on
>> the nature and purposes of the critical literature review another time.
>> At the moment, I’m in Delft for the IASDR conference. This morning,
>> we’re holding the doctoral colloquium. Some of the best new
>> researchers from around the world present the work they are doing to
>> complete a PhD, with the idea that interaction and consultation with
>> each other and with senior scholars will help them to develop and
>> improve their thesis projects.
>> 
>> Yours,
>> 
>> Ken
>> 
>> Professor Ken Friedman, PhD, DSc (hc), FDRS | University Distinguished
>> Professor | Dean, Faculty of Design | Swinburne University of Technology
>> | Melbourne, Australia | [log in to unmask] | Ph: +61
>> 39214 6078 | Faculty 
>> 
>> --
>> 
>> Victor Margolin wrote:
>> 
>> --snip--
>> 
>> Much has been written on this list since my initial post a few days ago
>> about literature and literacy. Ken amplified some of my points by
>> discussing a field's need for a literature and the importance of knowing
>> the literature and building on it. The discussion has moved to websites
>> and programs to keep track of high volumes of reading material. The
>> point I wish to return to is the function of core reading material in a
>> field's development. In that spirit, I would like to distinguish between
>> a list of resources and an intellectual history that locates texts in a
>> framework of when they were written, what they responded to, how they
>> addressed what came before them, what effect they had on what came after
>> them, what other texts they relate to, when and where were these other
>> texts produced. It is this intellectual history of design studies and
>> design research that a good PhD program should provide so that a student
>> can locate her or his own thinking within a trajectory, as I mentioned
>> in my initial post. As to the gendering of texts, by first locating them
>> within an intellectual history, one can expose the gender implications
>> and patterns within which they exist. There are particular moments when
>> women began to publish texts on design history or design and these
>> moments have increased as many more women have entered the fields of
>> design and design research. I am not a big fan of lists if the material
>> on the lists has no context, no relation between the texts. The basic
>> point of my initial post was to argue for a mapping of texts and issues
>> as a way to orient old and new researchers so that  thought in the
>> design research field can develop as it has in other fields where such
>> mapping has occurred. The point is not to collect resources but rather
>> to know where and when they originated and why.
>> 
>> --snip--
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 09:11:04 +0000
>> From:    marcio rocha <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Why website displays are not like paper displays
>> 
>> Don't forget something important to add to all this information about
>> website and webdesign.
>> 
>> The variety and limitations of the different users.
>> People with especial needs, blind, movements limitation, cognitive
>> limitations, and so on.
>> Put all together, and work with web design has been a huge challenge for
>> everyone which
>> need to work with web design in a high level of quality.
>> 
>> Marcio Rocha
>> 
>> 
>> On Sun, Oct 30, 2011 at 4:50 PM, Don Norman <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>>> Gunnar said, and i quote:
>>> 
>>> "Websites are not like paper displays. It's probably a mistake to think
>>> that websites are like websites, however."
>>> 
>>> Brilliant
>>> 
>>> Don
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> Marcio Rocha
>> 
>> Transtechnology Research
>> University of Plymouth, UK
>> http://trans-techresearch.net/researchers/marcio-rocha
>> 
>> +0 7553 614185
>> 
>> Federal University of Brazil
>> Visual Arts Faculty
>> Graphic design Department
>> www.fav.ufg.br
>> www.ufg.br
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:44:29 +0000
>> From:    Salmi Eija <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Cumulus - global association to serve art and design education
> and research
>> 
>> Dear All PhD-Design Colleagues,
>> 
>> thanks for Marcio for informing all about Cumulus = Cumulus International
> Association of Universities and Colleges of Art, Design and Media -
>> 
>> www.cumulusassociation.org
>> 
>> What is Cumulus?
>> ========================
>> 
>> Cumulus is a platform for partnership in art, design and media education
> and research. 
>> Cumulus was founded as a network in 1990 by the Royal College of Art in
> London and the University of Art and Design Helsinki (Finland).
>> It consisted in the next phase of six universities from Europe and was
> happy to e.g. to be supported by European Union Erasmus programme of the
> time.
>> Over the years the interest towards Cumulus grew and some Erasmus networks
> merged with Cumulus. In 2001, Cumulus started to be together 
>> in the form of an association but in a very unique way - trying to avoid
> too much administration and letting people to gather together under its
> umbrella the way people want.
>> Today Cumulus is 176 institutional members from 44 countries. Cumulus does
> not seek members for money and is fully non-profit. It can reach all its
> close to 200.000 students and
>> many thousands of people working as academics and staff. 
>> 
>> What Cumulus does?
>> ========================
>> 
>> It is an umbrella for people to be together like this PhD-list.  As a
> standard form for Cumulus members to share, transfer knowledge and best plus
> worst practices is to meet
>> during the conferences under Cumulus umbrella hosted  by its member
> institutions two times a year. Some of them are more towards research, some
> of them less but almost all do include a
>> research part in the programme and through a CfP.  There are also content
> specific Cumulus working groups - like Visual Communication, Sustainability
> Working group, Leadership and Strategy and so on... and they do meet
> normally during the conferences. 
>> 
>> Cumulus members can also organize events marketed through Cumulus site.
> Also, other events that are organized under Cumulus umbrella are done - like
>> in 2012 alongside the two main conferences; Helsinki Finland World Capital
> Year event in May 2012 and Santiago Chile November 2012, there will be one
> with Hermitage and Cumulus March 2012 and October with the Russian Designers
> Association and Cumulus and so on. Cumulus has also job section in its site
> and is open what the members do need. Partners do many collaborate among
> themselves as they wish - e.g. mobility, projects together,  joint research
> projects etc. Cumulus also organizes exhibitions as some examples in Louvre
> Paris 2002  and 2010 in Shanghai celebrating Cumulus 20 years anniversary
> being part of World Expo 2010 year.  Cumulus Executive Board is also very
> active by organizing events and activities under the Cumulus umbrella. 
>> 
>> Cumulus has partnerships for instance with the American designer´s
> association AIGA and some more in the professional field are to come;
> European League of the Institutes of the Arts, Cumulus is recognized by
> Unesco,  partnership with US accreditation institution NASAD, With the
> European Union OHIM agency in Alicante Spain responsible for registering
> trademarks and designs, Desis  Network for Social Innovation and
> Sustainability, Cumulus  has declared Kyoto Design Declaration in 2008 that
> Cumulus Green is an award prized every now and then and many more good
> things to serve the whole of art, design and  media. The secretariat of
> Cumulus is according to the decision of Cumulus hosted by its member
> institution and it is taken care by the Aalto University School of Art and
> Design in Finland.
>> 
>> Go and see  -  www.cumulusassociation.org
>> 
>> Next main conferences in 2012
>> 
>> Helsinki Finland 23-26 May 2012 Aalto University School of Art and Design
> - Northern World Mandate - Cumulushelsinki2012.org/
>> Santiago Chile 14 - 17 November 2012 Santiago, Chile Instituto Profesional
> DuocUC http://www.duoc.cl/cumulus2012/
>> 
>> If you get interested just please email to us;
>> 
>> [log in to unmask]
>> [log in to unmask]
>> Christian Guellerin; [log in to unmask] - Cumulus President
> Nantes France
>> 
>> Best, 
>> 
>> Eija & Justyna
>> 
>> Eija Salmi (mrs)
>> Director International Affairs Aalto University School of Art and Design 
>> Secretary General  
>> Cumulus International Association of Universities and Colleges of Art,
> Design and Media
>> www.cumulusassociation.org
>> http://taik.aalto.fi/en/
>> www.aalto.fi
>> 
>> Mailing address: PO BOX 31000, 00076 Aalto, Finland
>> Visiting address: Hämeentie 135 C 000560 Helsinki
>> tel. +358947030534
>> fax. + 358947030595
>> 
>> "Cumulus is the only global association representing art, design and media
> education in the world. It was founded in 1990 and has today 176 prominent
> members from 44 countries".
>> 
>> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related
> research in Design [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Marcio
> Dupont
>> Sent: 30. lokakuuta 2011 2:10
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: Cumulus - global association to serve art and design education
> and research
>> 
>> Hi friends
>> 
>> Just found this interesting association, Cumulus, the only global
> association to serve art and design education and research.
>> 
>> http://www.cumulusassociation.org/home
>> 
>> Best!
>> 
>> *Marcio Dupont Caballero  de Carranza*
>> Industrial Designer and Sustainability Analyst
>> 
>> Linkedin <http://br.linkedin.com/in/marciodupont>
>> Sustainable Design Blog <http://marciodupont.blogspot.com/>
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:35:18 +0000
>> From:    Vicky Teinaki <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The shoemaker'c children: designers who produce lousy web
> pages
>> 
>> Hi all,
>> 
>> I've been waiting for someone to take the web-design-in-large-orgs
> perspective on this, it hasn't happened so I guess I'll have to do it. 
>> 
>> Sure, the site isn't that great, but to go to the lengths to suggest one
> shouldn't study there? For having an old (the technologies and archive
> trawls suggest it hasn't changed since the mid noughties) website? 
>> 
>> It's one thing for a consultant to criticise a site, another to actually
> work on a site redev and have to push any changes through multiple levels of
> bureaucracy and programme name changes (yes, I know of sites stuck in beta
> for years while the design discipline names keep changing). 
>> 
>> Were this a discussion about what should and should not be discussed on a
> design education website, I'd feel this was an appropriate forum. However,
> as it stands, I'd have much rather seen web design criticism and the like
> happen in a forum such as the IXDA (Interaction Designers Association).
> http://www.ixda.org/ (For those interested in things web-devvy, it has free
> membership and highly recommended, even if Twitter and FB mean it doesn't
> have quite as many posts as it used to). I know at least one member
> occasionally chimes in with his perspective from working on the US military
> site: that's a real eye opener in terms of both levels of sign-off and their
> design constraints.
>> 
>> As it stands, this argument reminds me much of the Dustin Curtis vs
> American Airlines website story, as chronicled on Fast Company:
> http://www.fastcompany.com/blog/cliff-kuang/design-innovation/how-self-defea
> ting-corporate-design-process-one-designer-finds-ou
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 14:13:33 +0200
>> From:    esra bici <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> Dear all,
>> Hope you are all fine.
>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>> 'modern flat'.
>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>> standardized into flats?
>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>> contexts.
>> 
>> Cheers,
>> Esra.
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 10:12:09 -0300
>> From:    luis vasconcelos <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> dear, esra,
>> although it is not much, here goes something to begin with:
>> http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-12483492
>> maybe this lucy worsley can be a good source for your research.
>> kind regards,
>> arthur.
>> 
>> On Mon, Oct 31, 2011 at 9:13 AM, esra bici <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>>> Dear all,
>>> Hope you are all fine.
>>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>>> 'modern flat'.
>>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>>> standardized into flats?
>>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>>> contexts.
>>> 
>>> Cheers,
>>> Esra.
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> Luis Arthur Leite de Vasconcelos
>> MSc student at the Federal University of Pernambuco – UFPE – Brazil
>> Researcher at the Virtual Reality and Multimedia Research Group – CIn –
>> UFPE
>> +55 81 86994402
>> +55 81 91580443
>> skype: josie4401
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 15:30:50 +0100
>> From:    Jean Schneider <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> Hello Esra,
>> 
>> Don't take it as an offence, but have you been unable to find a few  
>> references about that in your local libraries, if not in design, for  
>> sure in architecture (regarding the organisation of buildings and  
>> standardisation ?)  and in interior architecture (regarding the  
>> definition of functional spaces?) ? This seems difficult to believe !
>> 
>> Good luck with your research !
>> 
>> Jean
>> 
>> Le 31 oct. 11 à 13:13, esra bici a écrit :
>> 
>> Dear all,
>> Hope you are all fine.
>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>> 'modern flat'.
>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>> standardized into flats?
>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>> contexts.
>> 
>> Cheers,
>> Esra.
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 22:40:54 +0800
>> From:    "CHUA Soo Meng Jude (PLS)" <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> That's a very interesting question.  I;ve myself always wondered how the
> "drawing room" came about in the English house, until I was told one day
> that it is in fact the "withdrawing" room shortened, and it was a room into
> which the women withdrew when the men were in the living room entertaining
> guests.  But don't take my word for it: best to get this verified.
>> 
>> Jude
>> ________________________________________
>> From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related
> research in Design [[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of esra bici
> [[log in to unmask]]
>> Sent: Monday, October 31, 2011 8:13 PM
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Subject: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> Dear all,
>> Hope you are all fine.
>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>> 'modern flat'.
>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>> standardized into flats?
>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>> contexts.
>> 
>> Cheers,
>> Esra.
>> National Institute of Education (Singapore) http://www.nie.edu.sg
>> 
>> DISCLAIMER : The information contained in this email, including any
> attachments, may contain confidential information. 
>> This email is intended only for the use of the addressee(s) listed above.
> Unauthorised sight, dissemination or any other 
>> use of the information contained in this email is strictly prohibited. If
> you have received this email by fault, please 
>> notify the sender and delete it immediately.
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 16:53:17 +0200
>> From:    esra bici <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> I have. But it has not been a very easy and quick thing to find out.
>> Even my architect collegues could not answer immediately.
>> I have found some lecture notes of an Architect- professor.
>> There are many architecture books that show great illustrations about
> first
>> modern flats but not about the related sociological consequences and the
>> origin of the emergence of the functional seperations.
>> 
>> But if I bother the list, please forgive me.
>> 
>> Kind regards,
>> Esra.
>> 
>> 
>> On Mon, Oct 31, 2011 at 4:30 PM, Jean Schneider
> <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>> 
>>> Hello Esra,
>>> 
>>> Don't take it as an offence, but have you been unable to find a few
>>> references about that in your local libraries, if not in design, for sure
>>> in architecture (regarding the organisation of buildings and
>>> standardisation ?)  and in interior architecture (regarding the
> definition
>>> of functional spaces?) ? This seems difficult to believe !
>>> 
>>> Good luck with your research !
>>> 
>>> Jean
>>> 
>>> Le 31 oct. 11 à 13:13, esra bici a écrit :
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Dear all,
>>> Hope you are all fine.
>>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>>> 'modern flat'.
>>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>>> standardized into flats?
>>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>>> contexts.
>>> 
>>> Cheers,
>>> Esra.
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> Esra Bici
>> Endüstri Ürünleri Tasarimcisi
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 23:20:31 +0800
>> From:    Terence Love <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> Dear Esra,
>> My guess is that how you see 'modern' is a not so obvious  defining
>> characteristic.
>> You probably already got there  -   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apartment
>> looks a useful starting point. 
>> Best wishes,
>> terry
>> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related
>> research in Design [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of esra
> bici
>> Sent: Monday, 31 October 2011 10:53 PM
>> To: Dr Terence Love
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> I have. But it has not been a very easy and quick thing to find out.
>> Even my architect collegues could not answer immediately.
>> I have found some lecture notes of an Architect- professor.
>> There are many architecture books that show great illustrations about
> first
>> modern flats but not about the related sociological consequences and the
>> origin of the emergence of the functional seperations.
>> 
>> But if I bother the list, please forgive me.
>> 
>> Kind regards,
>> Esra.
>> 
>> 
>> On Mon, Oct 31, 2011 at 4:30 PM, Jean Schneider
>> <[log in to unmask]>wrote:
>> 
>>> Hello Esra,
>>> 
>>> Don't take it as an offence, but have you been unable to find a few
>>> references about that in your local libraries, if not in design, for sure
>>> in architecture (regarding the organisation of buildings and
>>> standardisation ?)  and in interior architecture (regarding the
> definition
>>> of functional spaces?) ? This seems difficult to believe !
>>> 
>>> Good luck with your research !
>>> 
>>> Jean
>>> 
>>> Le 31 oct. 11 à 13:13, esra bici a écrit :
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Dear all,
>>> Hope you are all fine.
>>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>>> 'modern flat'.
>>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>>> standardized into flats?
>>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>>> contexts.
>>> 
>>> Cheers,
>>> Esra.
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> Esra Bici
>> Endüstri Ürünleri Tasarimcisi
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 17:18:23 +0100
>> From:    Rosan Chow <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Ken’s post on Zotero Group ‘Research Through Design’
>> 
>> Ken is right in pointing out the Zotero ‚Research Through Design’ group
>> library as it is now is nothing close to a critical literature review.  He
>> is however wrong to infer that I have misread Victor’s challenge.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> I would like to ask this forum to point me to a list of annotated
>> bibilography on Research Through Design that is publicly available.  Until
>> then, I do what I can with the help of others.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Perhaps we should take a moment to reflect on Victor’s request and ask why
>> we as a community of academic researchers have failed to deliver
>> bibliographies of design literature.  Until then, I do what I can with the
>> help of others.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> I don’t know who is happy and satisfied with the state of Design Research
>> as a field. I see that there is much work to do and we need to get
> everyone
>> involved to try different things besides having deans and professors
>> meeting each other at conferences advising doctoral students what they
>> should do and not do. Until then, I do what I can with the help of others.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Join us at Zotero
>> 
>> http://www.zotero.org/groups/research_through_design
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Rosan
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 07:13:42 +1300
>> From:    "Bill, Amanda" <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> Hi Esra,
>> Great topic. You might find more success in journals such as Home
> Cultures, or Urban Studies, or The Journal of the Society of Architectural
> Historians, or even Design History.
>> (30 seconds on google scholar)
>> 
>> Best,
>> Amanda
>> 
>> On 1/11/11 3:53 AM, "esra bici" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> 
>> I have. But it has not been a very easy and quick thing to find out.
>> Even my architect collegues could not answer immediately.
>> I have found some lecture notes of an Architect- professor.
>> There are many architecture books that show great illustrations about
> first
>> modern flats but not about the related sociological consequences and the
>> origin of the emergence of the functional seperations.
>> 
>> But if I bother the list, please forgive me.
>> 
>> Kind regards,
>> Esra.
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 14:49:53 -0500
>> From:    marcella eaton <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
>> 
>> This may or may not be of help, but the book "Housing, Substance of Our
> Cities, European Chronicle 1900-2007", edited/curated by Nasrine Seraji and
> published by A. & J. Picard, Paris is interesting. There was an exhibition
> in June of 2007 at the Pavillon de L'Arsenal in Paris.
> http://www.pavillon-arsenal.com/en/expositions/thema_modele.php?id_expositio
> n=187
>> 
>> A very interesting series of questions! Good luck with your work.
>> 
>> Best,
>> Marcella
>> 
>> Marcella Eaton, PhD
>> Associate Dean Academic
>> Environmental Design Program Chair
>> Associate Professor
>> Department of Landscape Architecture
>> Faculty of Architecture
>> University of Manitoba
>> Winnipeg, Manitoba
>> Canada
>> R3T 2N2
>> 
>> 2044747159
>> [log in to unmask]
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On 2011-10-31, at 7:13 AM, esra bici wrote:
>> 
>>> Dear all,
>>> Hope you are all fine.
>>> I am looking for references about the history and the emergence of the
>>> 'modern flat'.
>>> In the worldwide, how did the first flats appear and how was the housing
>>> standardized into flats?
>>> And how did the idea of considering the human needs as 'living room',
>>> 'bedroom', 'deskroom', etc. and seperating so evolved?
>>> I am looking for the consequences of this story related with the social
>>> contexts.
>>> 
>>> Cheers,
>>> Esra.
>>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 15:26:32 -0400
>> From:    Gunnar Swanson <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: screens and shoes
>> 
>> Francois,
>> 
>> That was a difficult question for a monday morning but now that the sun is
> over the yardarm, I'll take a stab at an answer. 
>> 
>> As I said, we struggle. And the more modest goals is to help students
> become people who think rather than teaching them to think. Since I was
> talking about using the act of making to reinforce thinking, I was thinking
> specifically about reflection as part of an iterative process. You're going
> to design a booklet. Instead of opening InDesign and setting up a document,
> first making a folding dummy means you can reflect on how the size and
> weight makes a person feel, what position(s) they'd be in when reading, etc.
> That, in turn, affects a pile of typographic choices. Then making tons of
> thumbnails (we're thumbnail nazis) means they can meditate on formal and
> communicative possibilities. In related discussion, we try to bring things
> back to what all this does from the reader/user/audience's perspective.
>> 
>> (This is slightly beside the point, but I've always been more comfortable
> trying to imagine real people using stuff. I don't know if it makes any
> difference if I say "This is the sort of thing Aunt Iona would be reading at
> her kitchen table and  the light there isn't very good and her vision is
> deteriorating so I should make this type a little bigger" or if I say "The
> demographic for this piece skews older so it should have bigger than typical
> type." In both cases, the type ends up bigger so I don't know if it really
> matters but I think it moves my design in a better direction. Around the
> time I started thinking and talking about this, I ran across an interesting
> article by Dana Cuff. "Architects' People" centered on interviews with
> architects asking them how they thought about the people who would use their
> building. I highly recommend it.)
>> 
>> So, as was said in earlier posts, there's some tendency to want to make
> something that looks pretty on screen, hit command-p, and move on. Through
> the iterations of printing, making mock-ups, or otherwise making things
> real, a conversation can go on about various issues. Some of them are
> technical. Some of them are formal. A lot of them are about the various
> stakeholders and what their interests are. That includes functional stuff
> like why one version is easier to read than another but another more
> compelling, contextual stuff like when and where would someone encounter
> whatever you're designing, and emotional stuff like how does holding this
> little thing make me feel and how does holding this big thing make me feel.
> . .
>> 
>> We also try to squeeze in other issues by our choices about the subject or
> goals of their projects.
>> 
>> I probably haven't approached the "precisely" part and, despite valiant
> efforts, I don't claim to have made all of my students think about precisely
> anything, let alone actually teaching them to think about precisely
> anything.
>> 
>> 
>> Gunnar
>> 
>> Gunnar Swanson
>> [log in to unmask]
>> c: +1 252 258 7006
>> h: +1 252 754 1980
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Oct 30, 2011, at 9:19 PM, Francois Nsenga wrote:
>> 
>>> Dear Gunnar
>>> 
>>> Today, Sun, Oct 30, 2011, you wrote:
>>> 
>>> "At ECU, we struggle to help our students become people who make stuff
> AND
>>> think (and who use the way they make stuff in order to think.)"
>>> 
>>> I am curious to learn what precisely you teach your students to think
>>> about, and how you go about teaching them to think about it.
>>> 
>>> Regards
>>> 
>>> Francois
>>> Montreal
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 21:11:37 +0100
>> From:    Luke Feast <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Request: Annotated Design Research Bibliography
>> 
>> Hi Rosan and list,
>> 
>> There is a special issue of the journal Visible Language Vol. 36 (2)
>> 2002 titled 'An Annotated Design Research Bibliography: by and for the
>> design community'.
>> 
>> 
> http://visiblelanguagejournal.com/web/issues/issue/an_annotated_design_resea
> rch_bibliography_by_and_for_the_design_community
>> 
>> -snip-
>> This Annotated Design Research Bibliography brings together a network
>> of design scholars to select the most relevant bibliographical
>> references for the field of design. The books that appear annotated
>> are selected through two analytical approaches: the essentialness of
>> the book determined through a design community on-line ranking survey,
>> and the discipline distribution through field-keyword analysis.
>> Annotations were collected from the volunteer on-line survey
>> participants and a more focused community of individuals targeted for
>> each particular section including members of the Ph.D. listserv, the
>> Ph.D. community at the Institute of Design and its database. The
>> project consists of ninety books in three essential areas of design
>> study: 1) Philosophy and Theory of Design, 2) Principles and Methods
>> of Design Research, 3) Theory and Practice. Interpretations of the
>> observations from the data collected from the on-line bibliographic
>> survey are also suggestive of the state of design as a discipline.
>> -end snip-
>> 
>> The three annotated bibliographies are available here
>> 
>> Philosophy and Theory of Design
>> 
> http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/sites/www.lib.uts.edu.au/files/3575_Annotated_Phil
> osophy_and_Theory_of_Design_List2.pdf
>> 
>> Principles and Methods of Design Research
>> 
> http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/sites/www.lib.uts.edu.au/files/3575_Annotated_Prin
> cipals_and_Methods_of_Design_Research_List.pdf
>> 
>> Theory and Practice in Design
>> 
> http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/sites/www.lib.uts.edu.au/files/3575_Annotated_Theo
> ry_and_Practice_in_Design_Research_List.pdf
>> 
>> 
>> Regards
>> Luke Feast
>> 
>> PhD Candidate
>> Faculty of Design
>> Swinburne University of Technology
>> Australia
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 08:59:00 +1100
>> From:    Ken Friedman <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Re: Ken’s post on Zotero Group ‘Research Through Design’
>> 
>> Re: Ken’s post on Zotero Group ‘Research Through Design’
>> 
>> 
>> Rosan,
>> 
>> You wrote, “Ken is right in pointing out the Zotero‚ Research Through
>> Design’ group library as it is now is nothing close to a critical
>> literature review.  He is however wrong to infer that I have misread
>> Victor’s challenge.”
>> 
>> With respect to your claim, two points require comment.
>> 
>> First, the book list you’ve posted on Zotero is not an annotated
>> bibliography, but rather a list of print resources. An annotated
>> bibliography would offer 1) bibliographic citation, 2) author
>> background, 3) content or scope of text, 4) outline of the argument, 5)
>> description of intended audience, 6) description of research methods, 7)
>> conclusions, 8) reliability, 9) special features, 10) discussion of
>> relevance or usefulness, 11) thematic or conceptual analysis, 12)
>> discussion of strengths and limitations, 13) view or reaction of the
>> author of the annotated bibliography. You provide your views and
>> reactions, but you give no information about the items in the list.
>> 
>> My comment on your misreading of Victor’s note is not an inference.
>> To infer is to derive a conclusion from facts or premises. I drew no
>> inferences. I quoted Victor:
>> 
>> “I am not a big fan of lists if the material on the lists has no
>> context, no relation between the texts. The basic point of my initial
>> post was to argue for a mapping of texts and issues as a way to orient
>> old and new researchers so that thought in the design research field can
>> develop as it has in other fields where such mapping has occurred. The
>> point is not to collect resources but rather to know where and when they
>> originated and why.” 
>> 
>> The Zotero list does nothing more than collect resources. Victor makes
>> a different point: “The point is not to collect resources but rather
>> to know where and when they originated and why.”
>> 
>> Yours,
>> 
>> Ken
>> 
>> Professor Ken Friedman, PhD, DSc (hc), FDRS | University Distinguished
>> Professor | Dean, Faculty of Design | Swinburne University of Technology
>> | Melbourne, Australia | [log in to unmask] | Ph: +61
>> 39214 6078 | Faculty 
>> 
>> --
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
>> End of PHD-DESIGN Digest - 30 Oct 2011 to 31 Oct 2011 (#2011-269)
>> *****************************************************************
>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 06:52:01 +0000
> From:    Ann Thorpe <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: The History of 'Modern Flat'
> 
> Esra,
> I don't recall how directly this book talks about flats, per se, but Witold
> Rybczynski's book "Home, a short history of an idea" does a good job
> explaining how various rooms in the house evolved over time (from the middle
> ages) and how furniture etc. affected the idea of home, particularly with
> respect to notions of comfort.
> Best,
> Ann
> 
> Dr Ann Thorpe
> .....................................
> AIA, assoc.
> 
> +44 (0)77 1747 1606
> .....................................
> book: The Designer's Atlas of Sustainability (www.designers-atlas.net)
> blog: http://designactivism.net
> twitter: @atlasann
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 10:25:51 +0100
> From:    Rosan Chow <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Request: Annotated Design Research Bibliography
> 
> Hi Luke,
> 
> Thanks for the links. I am aware of these lists and I have made use of them
> when I was a PhD student. Great efforts from Sharon and others. I
> particularly like the fact that the then PhD students were involved in
> putting these together. I hope someone will take the lists further in some
> innovative way. Perhaps you and your colleagues under the leadership of
> your dean?
> 
> But my request was more specific focusing on Research Through Design. ...
> Until then, I do what I can with the help of others.
> 
> Best,
> Rosan
> 
> Date:    Mon, 31 Oct 2011 21:11:37 +0100
>> From:    Luke Feast <[log in to unmask]>
>> Subject: Request: Annotated Design Research Bibliography
>> 
>> Hi Rosan and list,
>> 
>> There is a special issue of the journal Visible Language Vol. 36 (2)
>> 2002 titled 'An Annotated Design Research Bibliography: by and for the
>> design community'.
>> 
>> 
>> http://visiblelanguagejournal.com/web/issues/issue/an_annotated_design_research_bibliography_by_and_for_the_design_community
>> 
>> -snip-
>> This Annotated Design Research Bibliography brings together a network
>> of design scholars to select the most relevant bibliographical
>> references for the field of design. The books that appear annotated
>> are selected through two analytical approaches: the essentialness of
>> the book determined through a design community on-line ranking survey,
>> and the discipline distribution through field-keyword analysis.
>> Annotations were collected from the volunteer on-line survey
>> participants and a more focused community of individuals targeted for
>> each particular section including members of the Ph.D. listserv, the
>> Ph.D. community at the Institute of Design and its database. The
>> project consists of ninety books in three essential areas of design
>> study: 1) Philosophy and Theory of Design, 2) Principles and Methods
>> of Design Research, 3) Theory and Practice. Interpretations of the
>> observations from the data collected from the on-line bibliographic
>> survey are also suggestive of the state of design as a discipline.
>> -end snip-
>> 
>> The three annotated bibliographies are available here
>> 
>> Philosophy and Theory of Design
>> 
>> http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/sites/www.lib.uts.edu.au/files/3575_Annotated_Philosophy_and_Theory_of_Design_List2.pdf
>> 
>> Principles and Methods of Design Research
>> 
>> http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/sites/www.lib.uts.edu.au/files/3575_Annotated_Principals_and_Methods_of_Design_Research_List.pdf
>> 
>> Theory and Practice in Design
>> 
>> http://www.lib.uts.edu.au/sites/www.lib.uts.edu.au/files/3575_Annotated_Theory_and_Practice_in_Design_Research_List.pdf
>> 
>> 
>> Regards
>> Luke Feast
>> 
>> PhD Candidate
>> Faculty of Design
>> Swinburne University of Technology
>> Australia
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 08:41:20 -0400
> From:    Peter Jones | Redesign <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: texts
> 
> With the discussions about annotated bibliographies, reference lists, and
> exchange of references - I'm wondering whose concerns we are trying to
> resolve?  Ken Friedman is advocating Victor Margolin's interest in seeing
> the development of annotated literature sets for different design contexts.
> This could be considered an exercise in disciplinary development - and it
> would be a useful one for graduate students to contribute. If this were to
> develop a body of knowledge, advanced degree learners would find it very
> useful. They are the ones exploring the core and the edges of the literature
> under our guidance. 
> 
> Faculty already prepare contextual bibliographies with every syllabus. The
> course outline and the framing of problems in each session give context for
> the readings. Within courses and independent studies we may require
> annotated bibliographies. I have to say in my experience I have not ever
> seen an annotated bibliography as thorough as the review format Ken
> suggests. It's a very didactic approach, and while useful at the PhD level
> for literature mastery, I think it's too much for the MDes level, which is a
> practitioner degree.  
> 
> Consider other practitioner degrees and the level of learning and risk they
> must address in their professions - health sciences and engineering for
> example. I've been researching and designing information resources for
> medical education and biomedical research and I've seen no evidence of this
> level of literature review in the med schools and residencies I've observed.
> Medicine has become evidence directed to a great extent over the last decade
> or so (although evidence-based medicine is not the only modality, I see a
> universal reliance on high quality evidence for clinical decision making).
> Yet, the practitioners and learners themselves are not creating bibs - they
> (almost universally) are weaving readings into practice cases, holding
> journal club sessions with faculty, and are talking about controversies and
> exceptions in topical conferences.  And yes, annotated materials are
> employed in these session, called review articles, a scholarly survey of the
> literature around a condition or clinical problem. Authors get credit for
> their publication, they are used in education, but the annotated bib per se
> is not a major learning device in medicine.
> 
> There's good support for this kind of problem-oriented sensemaking approach
> to learning literature and advancing knowledge.  But the medical literature
> has a more canonical structure than design, and I'd include as well social
> sciences. The purposes of medical articles being reviewed are
> well-understood by their readers. But the purposes of design research and
> publication are usually oriented toward  practice and problems - and design
> publication styles vary widely from the iconoclastic to the scientific. Like
> engineering, design is (more of) a problem-oriented discipline, and
> literatures are used for practical problem investigation more than didactic
> knowledge building. So perhaps we need to consider those purposes in new
> types of reviews that offer support to practitioners? 
> 
> What are we using literatures for? Why can't a list of publications on
> Zotero become useful as an emerging reference resource as our contributions
> to it yield new insights, that in turn add annotations or commentary to the
> lists? Where is our sense of using design thinking to advance the tools of
> the trade, as it were? I have more to add to this, but I'd like to hear more
> about what the problems are these bibliographies are intended to address.
> Are they disciplinary development, literature mastery, or transdisciplinary
> problem solving?
> 
> Best, Peter
> 
> Peter Jones, Ph.D. 
> Associate Professor, Faculty of Design
> Strategic Foresight and Innovation
> 
> OCAD University
> http://DesignDialogues.com 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 13:38:30 +0000
> From:    "G. Mauricio Mejía"
>         <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Why website displays are not like paper displays
> 
> Hi all, 
> 
> Don said: "Getting legible type -- form size, contrast, and line length -- is a real challenge.  But it can be done."
> I would hightlight (impied in Don's post): Getting white space -- balance, rythm, proportion, and harmony -- is a real challenge. But it can be done. 
> 
> Another thought: 
> Interaction and web design have revealed the complexities not only of technical and compositional challenges but also communicative and interactive challenges, which are the actual real challenges. Difficulties on legibility, composition, usability, interaction have always been there in other visual media (print, environmental, audiovisual). But it was easier for designers to ignore them and go with an ego-centered design decision-making style. In the digital medium we now know if people actually use/process the information and we cannot do what we want anymore.
> 
> We should apply what we are forced to learn in digital media to traditional media.
> 
> G. Mauricio Mejía
> A little bit experienced web/interaction designer
> http://www.mauricio-mejia.com
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 2 Nov 2011 01:30:39 +1100
> From:    Ken Friedman <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: texts
> 
> Dear Peter,
> 
> Thanks for your reply. I’m reproducing the entire note because you
> raise so many issues.
> 
> First, Victor was not advocating “annotated literature sets.” He is
> calling for developmental concept mapping through the literature of a
> field. The tools for this kind of conceptual development map are the
> critical literature review and the bibliographic essay. I had not
> earlier mentioned the bibliographic essay -- this is a medium common to
> the humanities and to history, but less common in the social sciences
> Victor is right. As you note, the literature review article is an
> important tool in advancing the knowledge of many fields. I’d have to
> ask across fields to learn whether this is as insignificant in medical
> research as you suggest. I observe that any kind of work that is
> recognized for tenure and promotion – as critical literature review
> articles are – tend be seen as significant contributions to the
> literature.
> 
> The critical literature review was the subject of an extensive thread
> earlier this year, and I will return to this again. But a critical
> literature review is quite different to an annotated bibliography –
> for researchers past the doctorate, the critical literature review is a
> way of mapping concepts through the past to address the future
> development of a field. On several occasions, I have referred to a
> particularly useful article on the subject,
> 
> Webster, Jane, and Richard T. Watson. 2002. “Analyzing the Past to
> Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review.” Management
> Information Science Quarterly Vol. 26 No. 2, (June), xiii-xxiii.
> 
> There is also an excellent book:
> 
> Hart, Chris. 1998. Doing a Literature Review. Releasing the Social
> Science Imagination. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications.
> 
> The second point is that I was not advocating “annotated literature
> sets.” I advocate the value of the annotated bibliography under
> certain circumstances. If you’ve been reading the design literature,
> you likely haven’t seen annotated bibliographies of the kind I
> described, but these are the kinds of rich annotation and thick
> description that make an annotated bibliography a useful step on the way
> to a critical literature review or a bibliographic essay. These kinds of
> notes are more than didactic: they are useful stand-alone research
> tools. Such a tool is quite different to the curriculum reading list or
> contextual bibliography that accompanies most university courses. An
> annotated bibliography is a research tool.
> 
> Third, the concerns I address here are those of researchers and
> research students. This thread is a series of comments on the research
> literature for those researchers and research students. I appreciate the
> concerns you raise with respect to practitioners and MDes students, but
> this list is PhD-Design, not MDes-Design. My purpose here is to
> strengthen the research base of our field. Thus my concern with
> effective and well structured annotated bibliographies, as well as with
> critical literature reviews.
> 
> Fourth, there is no reason in an abstract sense to prevent a tool such
> as Zotero from being useful. The problem is the reality: it is an
> amateur effort that features poorly organized and uninformative
> contributions. I am puzzled by the repeated number of suggestions on
> this list that address the lack of practitioner-oriented tools for
> research and advanced professional development by suggesting wikis,
> wookies, wonkies, and any other kind of amateur tool resembling a Judy
> Garland and Mickey Rooney “let’s put on a show” movie from the
> 1930s. This kind of work doesn’t get done when everyone waits for
> someone else to write up an entry in the hope that each entry will
> attract another, with the final result being a useful document. Even if
> one entry did attract more – and the evidence is that this doesn’t
> often happen – it would still need editing, rewriting, and development
> to make a tool useful to practitioners. If this is a gap in our
> literature, why doesn’t someone do the hard yards and actually write
> and develop some of these tools – just as medical researchers write
> articles and prepare documents that practicing surgeons and physicians
> find useful. Zotero and things like it don’t work. To make them work
> would take more work than simply writing up some decent projects that
> practitioners can use. There are many who claim that design research
> does not serve the practitioner well enough. This is partly true. My
> challenge is to suggest that those who know what practitioners need
> write these documents rather than complaining about the gap in the
> literature. If there is a gap, fill it rather than demanding that those
> with a different research focus should shift their attention from the
> projects that require their efforts, knowledge, and skill.
> 
> On a fifth and slightly different point, I appreciate Rosan’s
> suggestion that my faculty take the lead in developing a series of
> appropriately rich annotated bibliographies and critical literature
> reviews. I will look into this. Before I return to Australia, I’ll
> have a conversation with colleagues here in Delft to see who might like
> to join in such a venture.
> 
> Best regards,
> 
> Ken
> 
> Professor Ken Friedman, PhD, DSc (hc), FDRS | University Distinguished
> Professor | Dean, Faculty of Design | Swinburne University of Technology
> | Melbourne, Australia | [log in to unmask] | Ph: +61
> 39214 6078 | Faculty 
> 
> 
> On Tue, 1 Nov 2011 08:41:20 -0400, Peter Jones | Redesign
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> With the discussions about annotated bibliographies, reference lists,
> and exchange of references - I’m wondering whose concerns we are
> trying to resolve?  Ken Friedman is advocating Victor Margolin’s
> interest in seeing the development of annotated literature sets for
> different design contexts. This could be considered an exercise in
> disciplinary development - and it would be a useful one for graduate
> students to contribute. If this were to develop a body of knowledge,
> advanced degree learners would find it very useful. They are the ones
> exploring the core and the edges of the literature under our guidance.
> 
> Faculty already prepare contextual bibliographies with every syllabus.
> The course outline and the framing of problems in each session give
> context for the readings. Within courses and independent studies we may
> require annotated bibliographies. I have to say in my experience I have
> not ever seen an annotated bibliography as thorough as the review format
> Ken suggests. It’s a very didactic approach, and while useful at the
> PhD level for literature mastery, I think it’s too much for the MDes
> level, which is a practitioner degree.
> 
> Consider other practitioner degrees and the level of learning and risk
> they must address in their professions - health sciences and engineering
> for example. I’ve been researching and designing information resources
> for medical education and biomedical research and I’ve seen no
> evidence of this level of literature review in the med schools and
> residencies I’ve observed. Medicine has become evidence directed to a
> great extent over the last decade or so (although evidence-based
> medicine is not the only modality, I see a universal reliance on high
> quality evidence for clinical decision making). Yet, the practitioners
> and learners themselves are not creating bibs – they (almost
> universally) are weaving readings into practice cases, holding journal
> club sessions with faculty, and are talking about controversies and
> exceptions in topical conferences.  And yes, annotated materials are
> employed in these session, called review articles, a scholarly survey of
> the literature around a condition or clinical problem. Authors get
> credit for their publication, they are used in education, but the
> annotated bib per se is not a major learning device in medicine.
> 
> There’s good support for this kind of problem-oriented sensemaking
> approach to learning literature and advancing knowledge.  But the
> medical literature has a more canonical structure than design, and I’d
> include as well social sciences. The purposes of medical articles being
> reviewed are well-understood by their readers. But the purposes of
> design research and publication are usually oriented toward  practice
> and problems - and design publication styles vary widely from the
> iconoclastic to the scientific. Like engineering, design is (more of) a
> problem-oriented discipline, and literatures are used for practical
> problem investigation more than didactic knowledge building. So perhaps
> we need to consider those purposes in new types of reviews that offer
> support to practitioners?
> 
> What are we using literatures for? Why can’t a list of publications
> on Zotero become useful as an emerging reference resource as our
> contributions to it yield new insights, that in turn add annotations or
> commentary to the lists? Where is our sense of using design thinking to
> advance the tools of the trade, as it were? I have more to add to this,
> but I’d like to hear more about what the problems are these
> bibliographies are intended to address. Are they disciplinary
> development, literature mastery, or transdisciplinary problem solving?
> 
> Best, Peter
> 
> Peter Jones, Ph.D.
> Associate Professor, Faculty of Design
> Strategic Foresight and Innovation
> 
> OCAD University
> http://DesignDialogues.com
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 11:39:39 -0400
> From:    Michael Yap <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Why website displays are not like paper displays
> 
> Hello Mauricio,
> 
> Thanks for your reply, it really got me thinking this morning.
> 
> You said, and I quote: "In the digital medium we now know if people actually use/process the information and we cannot do what we want anymore."
> 
> Something about this statement made me pause.
> 
> For me, a sure sign that a designer has come into their full creative powers is his demonstration of knowing the constraints of a medium, adhering to the best practices working within those constraints defined by our field, then actively re-defining those best practices and constraints. A handy example is Jason Santa-Maria. One of the things that struck me about his early work was his affinity to setting really large type on the Web when others weren't. At the time, large type on the Web was a pretty big design conceit, but really, Jason was just applying to the Web the timeless lessons of typography born from print. Now, we see large type all over the web, I think, due in part to his work. He also went on to startup Typekit, which re-defined the constraints of setting type on the Web.
> 
> You are right in that, in the digital medium, we can observe all of the user behaviors that Don has already pointed out, yet, I dislike the idea of this ability limiting our design activities. I wonder if Santa-Maria paid too much attention to user behavior research, he would have gone on to accomplish the things I've already mentioned. 
> 
> Generally, what should our relationship to the best practices of working within the constraints of a medium? A demarcation of the bounds of design activity or a provocation to apply what we know are timeless lessons of design?
> 
> —M
> 
> ---------------------------
> Michael Yap
> MFA Candidate
> Interaction Design
> School of Visual Arts (SVA) 
> 
> tel     (415) 317-3428
> web     fancifuldevices.com
> twitter michaelryap
> ---------------------------
> 
> 
> 
> On Nov 1, 2011, at 9:38 AM, G. Mauricio Mejía wrote:
> 
>> Hi all, 
>> 
>> Don said: "Getting legible type -- form size, contrast, and line length -- is a real challenge.  But it can be done."
>> I would hightlight (impied in Don's post): Getting white space -- balance, rythm, proportion, and harmony -- is a real challenge. But it can be done. 
>> 
>> Another thought: 
>> Interaction and web design have revealed the complexities not only of technical and compositional challenges but also communicative and interactive challenges, which are the actual real challenges. Difficulties on legibility, composition, usability, interaction have always been there in other visual media (print, environmental, audiovisual). But it was easier for designers to ignore them and go with an ego-centered design decision-making style. In the digital medium we now know if people actually use/process the information and we cannot do what we want anymore.
>> 
>> We should apply what we are forced to learn in digital media to traditional media.
>> 
>> G. Mauricio Mejía
>> A little bit experienced web/interaction designer
>> http://www.mauricio-mejia.com
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 23:57:41 +0800
> From:    Terence Love <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: The shoemaker'c children: designers who produce lousy web pages
> 
> Dear Gunnar,
> 
> In rethinking the role of graphic designers in website design there  appears
> some benefit standing back a little . 
> Three points stand out:
> 1. Web design is taught to and practiced as design by professionals and
> students in Management Information Systems (MIS), Information Systems(IS),
> Computer Studies, ICT, software professionals, EBusiness MBAs, multiple
> fields of Engineering, Artists, multiple Social Science professions,
> Multimedia professionals, film-makers, journalists - and graphic designers.
> The assumption that web design is primarily an issue of  graphic design is
> not obvious.
> 2. Most of the web-design in the world today comprises database-driven
> websites in which the graphic appearance is managed by a suite of rules;
> where there are no webpages;  and where content is assembled, formatted and
> presented on the fly in an interactive manner that also involves aligning
> the rules with the properties of the appliance on which it is viewed. The
> display of the website is also automatically reformatted  depending on the
> current state of content being displayed (i.e. columns may be added or
> removed, line lengths changed, font sizes adjusted etc on the fly depending
> on the interactions between different content elements)
> 3. You hit the nail with your reference to AI-driven websites. For some
> years, this has been commonplace. Database-driven websites have for many
> years had a simple  AI engine to manage the moment by moment formatting and
> reformatting  of the appearance of content and users' interaction with the
> website. This AI-driven process identifies the viewing appliance
> characteristics, the structure of the multiple content elements (and
> software interventions) being presented on screen  and provides a different
> set of formatting rules for  the display engine to format the content on
> that appliance. 
> 
> The question is, where does the graphic designer contribute to these kinds
> of  website design? What is their best role?
> 
> For middle-scale database-driven websites (which is what I'm most familiar
> with), the appearance of the content is managed by a collection of CSS rules
> collated into a 'template'. Contributing to (rather than designing)  this
> template is probably the main point of input for a graphic designer in these
> kinds of websites (which are apparently around half of the web).  The formal
> definitions of rule and formatting structures by which  that 'visual
> styling'  is  translated into  displays for a variety of circumstances  is
> at different level of design. In addition is the composition of the
> information structure and its navigation and there there appears to be
> another contributory  role for graphic designers. My experience has been
> that this is not necessarily, however,  a strength for graphic designers who
> specialise in visual aesthetics particularly when content items are in the
> thousands with many different types, and menu navigation that may involve
> hundreds of possible choices by the user. 
> 
> To be a design 'control freak' in this web design environment means to
> control the rules that define the creation of lower level rules and
> automated decision-making processes that shape how content is assembled on
> screen. This is very different from the idea of  tightly defining the
> aesthetic appearance of a fixed web page.
> 
> A second interesting question is at what stage in a database-driven web
> design project is best to seek input  and draw on the skills of graphic
> designers? My feeling, and experience over the last few years, is that it
> works best if graphic designers  join the design team after the website
> organisation, structure, navigation and content has been created and the
> baseline usability has been settled,  i.e. when the website is already up
> and running.  I'd welcome your thoughts on this.
> 
> Best wishes,
> Terry
> ____________________
> Dr. Terence Love, FDRS, AMIMechE, PMACM, MISI 
> 
> Senior Lecturer,  Design
> Researcher, Social Program Evaluation Research Unit
> Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia
> Mob: 0434 975 848, Fax +61(0)8 9305 7629, [log in to unmask]
> 
> Senior lecturer, Dept of Design
> Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia
> 
> Director, Design Out Crime Research Centre
> 
> Honorary Researcher, Institute of Entrepreneurship and Enterprise
> Development
> Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
> ____________________
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related
> research in Design [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Gunnar
> Swanson
> Sent: Sunday, 30 October 2011 1:12 AM
> To: Dr Terence Love
> Subject: Re: The shoemaker'c children: designers who produce lousy web pages
> 
> On Oct 29, 2011, at 10:43 AM, Terence Love wrote:
>> Web  design problems can be more  'wrong design profession' rather than a
>> font size issue.
>> 
>> It occurs when web design is done by print-based graphic designers. 
> 
> Terry,
> 
> Early limits on the visual display of websites led to a couple of distinct
> approaches--Jakob Nielsen-type asceticism and David Siegel "Killer Website"
> jury rigging.  The former remains mired in a general suspicion of Dionysian
> terrorism (either the fear that someone, somewhere, might be having a good
> time or the somewhat more rational worry that party goers might leave the
> hotel room trashed.) The latter was undermined by advancing standards but
> not before many people developed the habit of relying on problematic
> alternatives, the site that started this conversation being an example.
> 
> Print designers do have some problems fitting into web design. (For my take
> on that subject ten years ago, see
> http://www.gunnarswanson.com/writing/WebVsDesign.pdf) We tend to be control
> freaks in a medium that only allows control in odd ways. Designing for the
> web is, in many ways, like pushing a rope. (Some of the realizations of web
> design would serve us graphic designers well in other media, too.)
> 
> The various attempts to make web design WYSIWYGish have ranged in quality of
> interface and quality of output. Part of this is because some technical
> choices are so fundamental to basic visual design decisions in a way that is
> much less common in print design. This makes print development application
> paradigms unsuitable to the task.
> 
> I've long thought that this is a place for an AI-driven application for
> design. When someone sets a width, the software would ask "What do you want
> to have happen if someone opens her browser wider? Does the window stay the
> same size, remain proportional. . .?" Or when someone does something that
> relies on specific browsers, it could say "What do you want to do about the
> 39% of web users who will not be able to see this?"  When someone sets links
> that are not described in text, it could say "Blind people will not be able
> to use your site because you didn't bother with tags. You client could be
> heading for a lawsuit (as well as, at very least, joining you for a long
> stay in purgatory.)" When someone makes forms that only work in Windows it
> could say "Warning: Your location has been sent to Gunnar Swanson. He is
> coming with six of his most thuggish friends and intends to do permanent
> physical harm to you."
> 
> It is worth pointing out that websites promoting graphic design programs
> should, like any other piece of promotional design, reflect their subject
> matter and satisfy their audience. One thing that would be as pathetic as a
> design school website acting like it was designed by a graphic designer is
> one looking like it was not.
> 
> 
> Gunnar
> ----------
> Gunnar Swanson Design Office
> 1901 East 6th Street
> Greenville NC 27858
> USA
> 
> [log in to unmask]
> +1 252 258 7006
> 
> http://www.gunnarswanson.com
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 12:15:40 -0400
> From:    Peter Jones | Redesign <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: texts
> 
> Ken - I appreciate the distinction making in your critique. I agree that we have several different purposes for critical, bibliographic, and narrative review of sources. Because the methods for producing these formats and outputs are quite similar (bibliographies, annotated, with summary, narrative, or multiple attributes) people often produce an adequate artifact and can confound the purposes. I would say that if we don't teach good practice at the MDes level, those that pursue a PhD will find this an especially difficult undertaking. We may teach critiquing, but critical review writing and literature reviews are pitiful in much of the design literature. 
> 
> And I agree there's a real need for disciplinary development and conceptual mapping of literature and concepts to theoretical and historical development. Developmental concept mapping through the literature is a PhD level task. But the outcome of this work should not be "just" individual learning. As I noted with respect to graduate medicine - Review articles are not only a primary means of practitioner and advanced resident study, they are also a significant output of fellows and faculty (and MD/PhD's) who have requirements for publishing, and are advancing their disciplines. I think we have some parallels to medical education, but at the PhD level design is being treated more like a social sciences PhD.  I'm not convinced this is the only or best model myself.
> 
> Medical professionals move into fellowships or PhD programs to pursue advanced study or pure research. At that stage, but not in residency as much, they are producing review articles. Residents in their research rotation often work on ongoing research projects, but as a PGY3 resident they do not initiate research, and they often join projects that are mid-stream and have their literature base well established.  Therefore, they may have the opportunity to write review article or produce critical literature reviews, but it's not that common in my observations of US programs.
> 
> So if our purpose is to strengthen the research base of our field, the tools you've indicated are ways to do promote those purposes, of course. I think there is room for different types of commitments in developing the concepts from literature.  One of them is a research-based approach I've been developing with a Pharmacy professor in U Toronto's Knowledge Media Design Institute. The Interpretive Collaborative Review is a process and a system (prototype) in search of funding. I can appreciate why something simple like Zotero achieves adoption (which is nicely articulated as a Web 2.0 design in many ways). Zotero meets 80% of the need while leaving the advanced features to academics. The ICR is described as:
> 
> Collaborative Discovery of Information Significance: A Framework for Making Sense of Healthcare Research
> 
> Peter Pennefather and Peter H. Jones. Laboratory for Collaborative Diagnostics, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto
> 
> We present a framework for collaborative sensemaking by a problem-focused community using electronically accessible scientific journal articles and other digital information artifacts. The framework guides collective structured evaluations of the significance of information sources associated with a given problem. The Interpretive Collaborative Review (ICR) framework is designed as a social informatics process. It is motivated by a need for researchers and practitioners to ascertain a current, collective interpretation of electronically accessible information and collectively generated propositions for problem understanding in complex and rapidly developing domains. Healthcare related information domains are used as an example where there is a need to integrate information derived from biomedical sciences, evidence-based measures of clinical outcomes, and health systems socio-economic analysis.
> 
> The ICR framework establishes a conceptual model and a process for explicit human assignment of reviews and scores to information sources within an online dialogical environment, enabling collaborative evaluation, discussion, and recording of significance relationships.  At least three necessary dimensions of significance relationships are recognized and evaluated with respect to each source considered: 1) match, 2) standing, and 3) authority. Match = Claims in the source (meaning), Standing = 
> Warranted linking of claim to evidence (agency), and Authority = Evidence in source (power). These referents have both objective data (associated with a publication) and subjective interpretations. 
> 
> Each dimension is further characterized by collective scoring for three qualities of value in the source: 1) knowledge validity, 2) precedence, and 3) maturity.  The resulting matrix of scores, specific comments, group editorial commentaries, and references are all woven into an electronic sensemaking narrative publication designed to be indexed, retrieved, and reviewed along with the associated corpus of prioritized sources. 
> 
> ICR makes a strong appeal for the dialogic construction of knowledge about collective problems using intentional human assignment of scores and reviews. We find that algorithmic relevancy scores are insufficient when considering the significance of materials in the context of collective problem solving. Human interpretation is needed to determine the relevance of a given information source to a problem context and to understand the range of equally valid perspectives in the recognition of that relevance. The authenticity of a source’s authorship can only be determined by another human being with contextual knowledge of the problem domain and of human motivations and ethical sensibilities. The credibility of a source to a problem situation represents another interpretive context, as the perception of the credibility of the source is a complex function of trust, expertise and of quality.
> 
> This is the ICR in summary, which serves some of the purposes we are discussing. It will publish review results electronically, yet also is compatible with peer-review and with new forms of editorial review.
> 
> I am quite in agreement with your purpose to address the gaps in our literatures and "to do the hard yards and actually write and develop some of these tools." I will just note that there's a lot more funding available to do this in medicine than in design!
> 
> Best, Peter
> 
> Peter Jones, Ph.D.
> Associate Professor, Faculty of Design
> Strategic Foresight and Innovation
> 
> OCAD University
> http://DesignDialogues.com
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 19:00:57 +0200
> From:    ranjit menon <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: The shoemaker'c children: designers who produce lousy web pages
> 
> Hi,
> 
> Interesting thread ..and here is one chance to introduce Van Halen as an
> analogy  >>
> 
> *"Van Halen did dozens of shows every year, and at each venue, the band
> would show up with nine 18-wheelers full of gear. Because of the technical
> complexity, the band's standard contract with venues was thick and
> convoluted -- Roth, in his inimitable way, said in his autobiography that
> it read "like a version of the Chinese Yellow Pages." A typical "article"
> in the contract might say, "There will be 15 amperage voltage sockets at
> 20-foot spaces, evenly, providing 19 amperes."*
> 
> *Van Halen buried a special clause in the middle of the contract. It was
> called Article 126. It read, "There will be no brown M&Ms in the backstage
> area, upon pain of forfeiture of the show, with full compensation." So when
> Roth would arrive at a new venue, he'd walk backstage and glance at the M&M
> bowl. If he saw a brown M&M, he'd demand a line check of the entire
> production. "Guaranteed you're going to arrive at a technical error," he
> wrote. "They didn't read the contract.... Sometimes it would threaten to
> just destroy the whole show."*
> 
> *In other words, Roth was no diva. He was an operations expert. He couldn't
> spend hours every night checking the amperage of each socket. He needed a
> way to assess quickly whether the stagehands at each venue were paying
> attention -- whether they had read every word of the contract and taken it
> seriously. In Roth's world, a brown M&M was the canary in the coal mine."*
> 
> 
> - Excerpt from "
> http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/143/made-to-stick-the-telltale-brown-mampm.html"
> 
> 
> So how is this story relevant here?
> 
> To make a comparison, the font may be a small issue in the holistic view of
> a massive website but similar to Van Halen's strategically positioned brown
> M n Ms, the readability itself may be the 'Canary in the coal mine' the are
> hints to certain problems in the web structure as a whole. For me, the
> readability of my own school's website was an important factor in assessing
> the pedagogy and the system of the school, because that content is the main
> frontier people deal with apart from hearsay.
> 
> It was an M and M factor that told me the school has design thinking
> thoroughly embedded in the system, since they got the basic things right,
> namely readability (just like Don was implying). : / First impressions are
> superfast and based on basic cognitive capabilities like readability and
> meaning (usually conveyed through type on a website like that) than any
> other aspect (or deeper arguments) that one doesn't need to care about. On
> the other hand, it could be the intention to keep fonts the way it is
> represented, maybe Im just a "young" guy who is old fashioned. Also dont
> know if I make sense or am I trolling here? :D
> 
> 
> 
> cheers and thanks for the provocations, :)
> 
> R
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On Tue, Nov 1, 2011 at 5:57 PM, Terence Love <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
>> Dear Gunnar,
>> 
>> In rethinking the role of graphic designers in website design there
>> appears
>> some benefit standing back a little .
>> Three points stand out:
>> 1. Web design is taught to and practiced as design by professionals and
>> students in Management Information Systems (MIS), Information Systems(IS),
>> Computer Studies, ICT, software professionals, EBusiness MBAs, multiple
>> fields of Engineering, Artists, multiple Social Science professions,
>> Multimedia professionals, film-makers, journalists - and graphic designers.
>> The assumption that web design is primarily an issue of  graphic design is
>> not obvious.
>> 2. Most of the web-design in the world today comprises database-driven
>> websites in which the graphic appearance is managed by a suite of rules;
>> where there are no webpages;  and where content is assembled, formatted and
>> presented on the fly in an interactive manner that also involves aligning
>> the rules with the properties of the appliance on which it is viewed. The
>> display of the website is also automatically reformatted  depending on the
>> current state of content being displayed (i.e. columns may be added or
>> removed, line lengths changed, font sizes adjusted etc on the fly depending
>> on the interactions between different content elements)
>> 3. You hit the nail with your reference to AI-driven websites. For some
>> years, this has been commonplace. Database-driven websites have for many
>> years had a simple  AI engine to manage the moment by moment formatting and
>> reformatting  of the appearance of content and users' interaction with the
>> website. This AI-driven process identifies the viewing appliance
>> characteristics, the structure of the multiple content elements (and
>> software interventions) being presented on screen  and provides a different
>> set of formatting rules for  the display engine to format the content on
>> that appliance.
>> 
>> The question is, where does the graphic designer contribute to these kinds
>> of  website design? What is their best role?
>> 
>> For middle-scale database-driven websites (which is what I'm most familiar
>> with), the appearance of the content is managed by a collection of CSS
>> rules
>> collated into a 'template'. Contributing to (rather than designing)  this
>> template is probably the main point of input for a graphic designer in
>> these
>> kinds of websites (which are apparently around half of the web).  The
>> formal
>> definitions of rule and formatting structures by which  that 'visual
>> styling'  is  translated into  displays for a variety of circumstances  is
>> at different level of design. In addition is the composition of the
>> information structure and its navigation and there there appears to be
>> another contributory  role for graphic designers. My experience has been
>> that this is not necessarily, however,  a strength for graphic designers
>> who
>> specialise in visual aesthetics particularly when content items are in the
>> thousands with many different types, and menu navigation that may involve
>> hundreds of possible choices by the user.
>> 
>> To be a design 'control freak' in this web design environment means to
>> control the rules that define the creation of lower level rules and
>> automated decision-making processes that shape how content is assembled on
>> screen. This is very different from the idea of  tightly defining the
>> aesthetic appearance of a fixed web page.
>> 
>> A second interesting question is at what stage in a database-driven web
>> design project is best to seek input  and draw on the skills of graphic
>> designers? My feeling, and experience over the last few years, is that it
>> works best if graphic designers  join the design team after the website
>> organisation, structure, navigation and content has been created and the
>> baseline usability has been settled,  i.e. when the website is already up
>> and running.  I'd welcome your thoughts on this.
>> 
>> Best wishes,
>> Terry
>> ____________________
>> Dr. Terence Love, FDRS, AMIMechE, PMACM, MISI
>> 
>> Senior Lecturer,  Design
>> Researcher, Social Program Evaluation Research Unit
>> Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia
>> Mob: 0434 975 848, Fax +61(0)8 9305 7629, [log in to unmask]
>> 
>> Senior lecturer, Dept of Design
>> Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia
>> 
>> Director, Design Out Crime Research Centre
>> 
>> Honorary Researcher, Institute of Entrepreneurship and Enterprise
>> Development
>> Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
>> ____________________
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related
>> research in Design [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Gunnar
>> Swanson
>> Sent: Sunday, 30 October 2011 1:12 AM
>> To: Dr Terence Love
>> Subject: Re: The shoemaker'c children: designers who produce lousy web
>> pages
>> 
>> On Oct 29, 2011, at 10:43 AM, Terence Love wrote:
>>> Web  design problems can be more  'wrong design profession' rather than a
>>> font size issue.
>>> 
>>> It occurs when web design is done by print-based graphic designers.
>> 
>> Terry,
>> 
>> Early limits on the visual display of websites led to a couple of distinct
>> approaches--Jakob Nielsen-type asceticism and David Siegel "Killer Website"
>> jury rigging.  The former remains mired in a general suspicion of Dionysian
>> terrorism (either the fear that someone, somewhere, might be having a good
>> time or the somewhat more rational worry that party goers might leave the
>> hotel room trashed.) The latter was undermined by advancing standards but
>> not before many people developed the habit of relying on problematic
>> alternatives, the site that started this conversation being an example.
>> 
>> Print designers do have some problems fitting into web design. (For my take
>> on that subject ten years ago, see
>> http://www.gunnarswanson.com/writing/WebVsDesign.pdf) We tend to be
>> control
>> freaks in a medium that only allows control in odd ways. Designing for the
>> web is, in many ways, like pushing a rope. (Some of the realizations of web
>> design would serve us graphic designers well in other media, too.)
>> 
>> The various attempts to make web design WYSIWYGish have ranged in quality
>> of
>> interface and quality of output. Part of this is because some technical
>> choices are so fundamental to basic visual design decisions in a way that
>> is
>> much less common in print design. This makes print development application
>> paradigms unsuitable to the task.
>> 
>> I've long thought that this is a place for an AI-driven application for
>> design. When someone sets a width, the software would ask "What do you want
>> to have happen if someone opens her browser wider? Does the window stay the
>> same size, remain proportional. . .?" Or when someone does something that
>> relies on specific browsers, it could say "What do you want to do about the
>> 39% of web users who will not be able to see this?"  When someone sets
>> links
>> that are not described in text, it could say "Blind people will not be able
>> to use your site because you didn't bother with tags. You client could be
>> heading for a lawsuit (as well as, at very least, joining you for a long
>> stay in purgatory.)" When someone makes forms that only work in Windows it
>> could say "Warning: Your location has been sent to Gunnar Swanson. He is
>> coming with six of his most thuggish friends and intends to do permanent
>> physical harm to you."
>> 
>> It is worth pointing out that websites promoting graphic design programs
>> should, like any other piece of promotional design, reflect their subject
>> matter and satisfy their audience. One thing that would be as pathetic as a
>> design school website acting like it was designed by a graphic designer is
>> one looking like it was not.
>> 
>> 
>> Gunnar
>> ----------
>> Gunnar Swanson Design Office
>> 1901 East 6th Street
>> Greenville NC 27858
>> USA
>> 
>> [log in to unmask]
>> +1 252 258 7006
>> 
>> http://www.gunnarswanson.com
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Ranjit Menon
> TAIK Helsinki
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 16:38:30 -0200
> From:    Luiz Vidal <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: RES: Call for Papers for International Conference on Design Creativity 2012
> 
> Marcos esta é para nós três.
> 
> -----Mensagem original-----
> De: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related
> researchin Design [mailto:[log in to unmask]] Em nome de Yukari Nagai
> Enviada em: sexta-feira, 28 de outubro de 2011 07:31
> Para: [log in to unmask]
> Assunto: Call for Papers for International Conference on Design Creativity
> 2012
> 
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Call for Papers for International Conference on Design Creativity 2012,
> Glasgow, 18-20 September 2012
> 
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> The 2nd International Conference on Design Creativity (ICDC 2012) will take
> place on 18.-20.09.2012 in Glasgow, Scotland.
> 
> Design Creativity is an important and interesting topic of study in design.
> Since it involves the profound and essential nature of design, design
> creativity is expected to be a key in not only addressing the social
> problems that we are facing, but also producing an innate appreciation for
> beauty and happiness in our minds. In order to elucidate the nature of
> design creativity, the following issues are being studied: 
> 
> - Cognitive processes underlying design creativity
> - Computational models of design creativity
> - Practical processes to incorporate the human and social dimensions
> 
> After the success of the first ever International Conference on Design
> Creativity in 2010 in Kobe, Japan, the 2012 event will take place in
> Scotland in close cooperation with the University of Strathclyde.
> 
> 
> Full paper submission: 09 March 2012
> 
> Please check the conference website for further details:
> http://www.icdc2012.org.uk
> 
> 
> 
> Program Chair of ICDC2012
> 
> Yukari Nagai
> 
> 
> 
> E-mail verificado pelo Terra Anti-Spam.
> Para classificar esta mensagem como spam ou nC#o spam, visite
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> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Tue, 1 Nov 2011 15:48:43 -0400
> From:    Gunnar Swanson <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: The shoemaker'c children: designers who produce lousy web pages
> 
> Terry,
> 
> On Nov 1, 2011, at 11:57 AM, Terence Love wrote:
> [snip]
>> The assumption that web design is primarily an issue of  graphic design is
>> not obvious.
> [snip]
>> The question is, where does the graphic designer contribute to these kinds
>> of  website design? What is their best role?
> 
> Just time for a quick note.
> 
> I wrote a piece for Steve Heller's -The Education of an E-Designer- back in 2000 about my students who didn't want to have anything to do with designing for the web. <http://www.gunnarswanson.com/writing/WebVsDesign.pdf> Just to prove that I've degenerated into a completely pompous fool, I'll quote me: 
> "Graphic designers often feel helpless when they find themselves in the role of visual dishwashers for the Information Architect chefs. What does that do for graphic designers or, perhaps more important, what does it do for graphic design? It depends, of course, on who runs, leads, or guides the teams. Leaders will be people with an understanding of the overall process but that could be someone with a background in design, computer programming, business administration—you name it. As the man said, go to an architect with a problem and you’ll get a building as a solution; the background of team leaders will greatly affect outcomes. As a graphic designer, I can’t help but hope for someone with a design perspective in charge."
> 
> So my short answer is that the answers to your questions are political but, like most things political, the results are real. If (good) graphic designers play a central role fairly early, things we recognize as important will be addressed. If we do not, they probably won't be. That will have real effects on the project result. I suspect that you and I would not always agree on how laudable or lamentable the effects are in specific cases.
> 
> 
> Gunnar
> ----------
> Gunnar Swanson Design Office
> 1901 East 6th Street
> Greenville NC 27858
> USA
> 
> [log in to unmask]
> +1 252 258 7006
> 
> http://www.gunnarswanson.com
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of PHD-DESIGN Digest - 31 Oct 2011 to 1 Nov 2011 (#2011-270)
> ****************************************************************
> 

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