JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  March 2011

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION March 2011

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: Feasts and Saints of the day - March 9

From:

John Dillon <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 9 Mar 2011 21:51:16 -0600

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (110 lines)

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

1)  Further visuals for the Forty Martyrs of Sebaste:

a)  Their suffering as depicted in the remains of the eighth-century apse fresco of the originally late antique oratorio dei Santi Quaranta Martiri Sebasteni adjacent to Santa Maria Antiqua in the Roman Forum:
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/srkD9JC6z1n3JvkcublQPw

b)  The suffering of the Forty as depicted (above the portraits) in an eighth- or perhaps earlier ninth-century fresco in the oratorio dei Quaranta Martiri in the Catacombe di Santa Lucia in Syracuse:
http://tinyurl.com/ydu7t5z
Before restoration:
http://tinyurl.com/yczl6uf

c)  The suffering of the Forty as depicted on a tenth-century ivory panel from Constantinople now in the Bode-Museum in Berlin:
http://tinyurl.com/yamt28v

d)  A set of expandable views of eleventh-century mosaic portraits of individual Sebastean martyrs in the cathedral of St. Sophia in Kyiv/Kiev starts at the bottom right of this page and continues through the next page into the start of the one that follows it:
http://tinyurl.com/28wg4r7

e)  The suffering of the Forty as depicted in a twelfth-century fresco in the church of Agios Nikolaos tis Stegis at Kakopetria (Limassol prefecture) in the foothills of the Troodos Mountains on Cyprus:
http://tinyurl.com/397nlgh

f)  A surviving fragment of the martyrs' suffering as depicted in the earlier thirteenth-century (1230s) frescoes of the church of the Ascension of Our Lord in the Mileševa monastery near Prijepolje (Zlatibor dist.) in southern Serbia:
http://tinyurl.com/y9s5qge

g)  The suffering of the Forty as depicted in a damaged later thirteenth-century fresco (ca. 1263-1270 or 1270-1272) in the northern choir of the monastery church of the Holy Trinity at Sopoćani (Raška dist.) in Serbia:
http://tinyurl.com/2fpwzct

h)  A brief video of details of a thirteenth-century Georgian icon of the suffering of the Forty:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ewg5x-72zfw

i)  The suffering of the Forty as depicted on a fifteenth-century Novgorod School icon now in the Timken Museum of Art, San Diego, CA:
http://tinyurl.com/6cwakme

j)  The suffering of the Forty as depicted in a later fifteenth-century copy (1463) of the _Speculum historiale_ of Vincent de Beauvais in its French-language version by Jean de Vignay (Paris, BnF, ms. Français 51, fol. 114):
http://tinyurl.com/4qsg4r3

k)  The suffering of the Forty as depicted on a late fifteenth- or early sixteenth-century Novgorod School icon tablet now in the State Tretyakov Museum in Moscow:
http://www.icon-art.info/masterpiece.php?lng=en&mst_id=1600


2)  Some visuals for Gregory of Nyssa.

a)  A view of what is said to be G.'s jawbone, preserved at the Visoki Dečani monastery near Peć in, depending on one's view of recent events, the Republic of Kosovo or Serbia's province of Kosovo and Metohija:
http://www.orthodoxphotos.com/Holy_Relics/Various/6.shtml

b)  G. as depicted in the eleventh-century mosaics of the cathedral of St. Sophia in Kyiv/Kiev (the actual portrait is full-length):
http://www.svetigora.com/files/images/23_7.jpg

c)  G. as depicted in an unsourced mosaic (eleventh[?]-century; can anyone identify it by location?):
http://www.gregor-von-nyssa.de/gregor1.htm

d)  G. (at left; St. Gregory of Nazianzus at right) as depicted in an eleventh- or twelfth-century copy of the _Orationes_ of St. Gregory of Nazianzus (Paris, BnF, ms. Coislin 239, fol. 158v):
http://tinyurl.com/y93gd7l

e)  A black-and-white image of G. as depicted in the later twelfth-century mosaics of the Capella Palatina in Palermo:
http://cache.eb.com/eb/image?id=45898&rendTypeId=4
For an idea of the colors of the original, herewith the Capella Palatina's corresponding images of Sts. Basil the Great and John Chrysostom:
http://tinyurl.com/4va3lx7

f)  G. as depicted in an earlier fourteenth-century mosaic (ca. 1312) in the parecclesion (now a museum) of the former church of the Pammakaristos (Fethiye camii) in Istanbul:
http://tinyurl.com/4wbqvco

g)  G. as depicted in an earlier fourteenth-century fresco (betw. ca. 1312 and 1321) in the altar area of the monastery church of the Theotokos at Gračanica in, depending on one's view of the matter, either Serbia's province of Kosovo and Metohija or the Republic of Kosovo:
http://tinyurl.com/4pye2n7

h)  G. (at right) in an earlier fourteenth-century fresco (betw. ca. 1313 and ca. 1320) in the King's Church (dedicated to Sts. Joachim and Anne) in the Studenica monastery near Kraljevo (Raška dist.) in southern Serbia:
http://tinyurl.com/yb6efda

i)  G. (at right; St. Athanasius at left) as depicted in an earlier fourteenth-century fresco (betw. 1335 and 1350) in the altar area of the church of the Holy Ascension at the aforementioned Visoki Dečani monastery:
http://tinyurl.com/yhgjkja
Detail:
http://tinyurl.com/yjpc2ud

j)  G. as depicted by Theofanis Strelitzas-Bathas (Theophanes the Cretan) in an earlier sixteenth-century fresco (1546 or 1546) in the katholikon of the Stavronikita monastery on Mt. Athos:
http://giornoxgiorno.myblog.it/media/00/00/1826258885.jpg


3)  TAN (mostly post-medieval): on Tuesday, March 8, 2011, at 11:09 pm, Terri Morgan sent:

> Forty Martyrs of Sebaste (d. 320) The cult of these inspirational and
> popular (in the east) saints was suppressed in the great calendar
> purge of
> 1969 (celebrated in the west on March 10, this is the Eastern Feast day).

Prior to its final parenthesis this sentence comes from Phyllis Jestice's notice of these saints in 2004: <http://tinyurl.com/4qjlo86>.  Its statement that their cult was suppressed in 1969 perpetuates a vulgar confusion between removal from the general Roman Calendar on the one hand and, on the other, the Roman Catholic church's formal suppression of a cult.  I can find no evidence that said church (or any other, for that matter) has ever suppressed this cult.

The sentence's final parenthesis is a re-wording of matter from Phyllis' notice of these saints in 2003: <http://tinyurl.com/4llg96v>   
Some "in the west" do still celebrate these saints on 10. March.  But in that same area most celebrate them today (9. March), just as they already did in 2003 and 2004.  Indeed, Phyllis' dropping of this matter from her notice of 2004 could suggest that by then she had already discovered that her comment of the previous year in this particular was misleading.  In the medieval west too these saints seem to have been celebrated chiefly on 9. March.  Some specifics follow:

Orthodox and other Eastern-rite churches, regardless of where their congregations are situated, ordinarily celebrate the Forty Martyrs of Sebaste on 9. March.  The tiny interdenominational Monastic Community of Bose, whose members are located chiefly in Italy, likewise commemorates the Forty Martyrs of Sebaste on 9. March <http://tinyurl.com/5u782z6>. 

Within the Roman Catholic church, churches using its Byzantine rite celebrate the Forty Martyrs of Sebaste on 9. March.  In the same church's Roman rite, the Martyrs of Sebaste are entered under 9. March in the revised Roman Martyrology of 2001 <http://tinyurl.com/4bswfxz>, <http://tinyurl.com/33klxt> and are listed among the "santi del giorno" for 9 Marzo on the site of the Conferenze episcopale italiana <http://tinyurl.com/2vstp3o>.  Still within the Roman Catholic church, the Ambrosian rite appears to commemorate the Forty Martyrs of Sebaste on 10. March: <http://tinyurl.com/6ele786>.  "Traditional Catholics" tend to commemorate the Forty Martyrs of Sebaste on 10. March.

In the Roman Martyrology prior to its revision of 2001 the Forty Martyrs of Sebaste were principally commemorated under 9. March with a second mention under 10. March, their former feast day in the general Roman Calendar.  In the earlier ninth-century Marble Calendar of Naples the Forty Martyrs are entered under 9. March.  In the later fifteenth- and sixteenth-century calendars used by Grotefend for the "Heiligenverzeichnis" of his _Zeitrechnung des Deutschen Mittelalters und der Neuzeit_ the overwhelming majority of commemorations of the Forty Martyrs occur under 9. March; 10. March occurs only once: <http://tinyurl.com/4bugrg4>.

Best,
John Dillon

**********************************************************************
To join the list, send the message: join medieval-religion YOUR NAME
to: [log in to unmask]
To send a message to the list, address it to:
[log in to unmask]
To leave the list, send the message: leave medieval-religion
to: [log in to unmask]
In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
[log in to unmask]
For further information, visit our web site:
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/medieval-religion.html

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager