JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  March 2011

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION March 2011

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Feasts and Saints of the Day: March 27

From:

Terri Morgan <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 27 Mar 2011 05:57:57 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (143 lines)

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Today, March 27  is the feast of:

John of Egypt (d. 394) was from Lycopolis in Lower Egypt. When he was 25 he
became a hermit. He became a model of obedience, tested by his mentor with
such tasks as watering a dry stick every day for a year, and when he was 40
had himself walled up into a small cell, from the window of which he taught
on Saturdays and Sundays. He attracted huge crowds, not only for his wisdom
but also for his reported miracles and prophecies and won the nickname
"prophet of the Thebaid" and Jerome and Augustine both venerated and
consulted him. He was also credited with the ability to read minds. He spent
forty years in his cell, which was discovered in 1925.
   According to the sources (principally, Palladius' Lausiac History and the
Historia Monachorum in Aegypto), John's importance was more than merely
local, and his reputation as a prophet rested on his predictions concerning
the military victories and death of the emperor Theodosius I. It is
possible, indeed, that he was actually consulted by Theodosius (via an
imperial embassy) about the outcome of the rebellions of Maximus (d. 388)
and Eugenius (d. 394).

Augusta (5th century) Legend says that Augusta was a daughter of a German
duke of Friuli (Italy) named Matrucus; he wasn't a Christian and one day he
was told that she was in the church praying - he rushed in upon her, dragged
her forth, and locked her up in a chamber of the castle. In ungovernable
fury he afterwards beat out her teeth, and executed her with his sword by
cutting off her head. Augusta's cult at Serravalle near Treviso is ancient.
Her cult is attested since 1234 at Serravalle, one of the municipalities in
the Trevisan Alps On this day in 1450 her relics were discovered during the
rebuilding of Serravalle's little church dedicated to her.
   Our sole detailed source for Augusta's life and passion is her early
modern Acta penned by Minuccio Minucci (1551-1604), a native of Serravalle
who became secretary to Clement VIII and finally archbishop of Zadar. 

Rupert (d. 717) Rupert (also Ruprecht) was a Frankish noble whom duke Theodo
II of Bavaria, who was related to him by marriage, had brought into his
lands as a bishop by 696. According to at least one of his early Vitae,
Rupert had previously been bishop of Worms but had been expelled. Where he
established his see is not altogether clear. Traditionally he was supposed
to have been given the ruins of Iuvavum to build a center, which became the
core of the city of Salzburg. He also seems at to have founded a couple of
small monasteries and at least one church in the general area, two of which
were the monastery of St. Peter and a convent on the Nonnberg (making his
niece Erentrudis abbess).  Rupert and his monks (he and his successors were
abbots of St. Peter's as well as bishops) conducted a successful mission
campaign that apparently extended far beyond the borders of the new diocese.
Both the year and the place of his death are unknown; the leading candidate
for the latter is Worms. In the later eighth century bishop St. Virgil
brought R.'s putative remains to Salzburg for the erection there of his new
cathedral.  The day of that translation, 24 September, is the date of
Rupert's feast in the dioceses of Salzburg, Freising, and Munich. Today is
his accepted dies natalis and his feast day in the General Roman Calendar.
   Rupert is the patron saint of Salzburg, whose cathedral is dedicated to
him and to St. Virgil. His cult is widespread in Bavaria and in those parts
of Austria and Italy that once belonged to the diocese of Salzburg. There is
a bishop's staff and a flask for journeys that are traditionally said to
have been his. Note that this was once the seat of the city's salt bureau.
It was believed that he had founded the industry there and so became a
patron saint of salt merchants. In his iconography he is often shown with a
small keg or bucket for salt. Here's a fifteenth-century example in the
Pfarrkirche zum heiligen Petrus at Sankt Peter am Kammersberg (Murau) in
Land Steiermark: http://tinyurl.com/c2x5de . And here's an example from
c1520, originally in the Rupertikirche at Stainach-Niederhofen (Liezen) in
Land Steiermark and now in the diocesan museum in Graz:
http://www.graz-seckau.at/content/allgemeines/img/bild06.jpg
   Another view of that statue and a German-language discussion of it are
here: http://www.niederhofen.at/seiten/erforschen_detail23.html
   The artifacts shown on this page (a bishop's staff and a flask for
journeys) are traditionally said to have been Rupert's:
http://tinyurl.com/2vqpvh
   Vienna's originally twelfth-century church dedicated to him contains a
wooden statue of Rupert from around 1370:
http://www.ruprechtskirche.at/fragmente121a1.htm

John Damascene (c749) - like his father before him, he served as Vizier to
the Caliph in Damascus; however, he left his riches to the poor and made a
pilgrimage to Jerusalem, eventually settling in the lavra of St Sabas; known
for his theological treatises (and his eloquence, earning him the nickname
'Chrysorrhoes', or 'Golden Stream'), he was declared Doctor by Pope Leo
XIII.

Matthew of Beauvais (end of 11th century) Having been made prisoner by the
Saracens, he was offered his life if he would renounce the cross of Christ.
He asked to be allowed to delay his reply till the following Friday. On that
day he was again urged to adopt their religion. He replied, "I asked you to
grant me this delay, not because I had any doubt as to what my decision
would be, but that I might have the honour and felicity of shedding my blood
on the same day as my Saviour Jesus Christ bled for me. Come then, strike
me! I give my life to Him who laid down His for mankind." So saying he knelt
and stretched forth his neck for the blow, and with one stroke was
decapitated.

Frowin (Blessed) ( d. 1178) The monk Frowin, whom the abbeys of Sankt
Blasien in the Black Forest and Einsiedeln in Switzerland later claimed as
one of their own, became abbot at Engelberg in today's Canton Obwalden in
the 1140s, putting an end to to a period of several years in which differing
parties strove for the leadership of this house. The author of a work on
seven books on free will and of a commentary on the Lord's Prayer, he is
best known for the establishment at Engelberg of an important scriptorium.
   Frowin has yet to grace the pages of the RM. Here he is at right (at
left, the scribe Richene) in a dedication portrait at the beginning of the
third and final volume of the Frowin Bible (Engelberg, Stiftsbibliothek,
Codd. 3-5; Cod. 5, fol. 1r): http://tinyurl.com/y9dpmj2

Panacea (d. 1383) Panacea (Panaxia, Panasia) is a poorly documented Blessed
whose cult centers on two towns in the diocese of Novara in Piedmont,
Quarona and Ghemme. According to legend (whose only surviving medieval
witnesses are a few frescoes in churches in the area), her father came from
Quarona, where she spent her brief life, and her mother, who died when
Panacea was three, came from Ghemme. The father remarried. When she was
fifteen her stepmother, who hated her and abused her, found her alone at
prayer in the countryside near their home (Panacea is variously said to have
been out gathering wood or tending sheep) and beat her to death with objects
that have been variously described but which usually include a wooden shaft
of some sort. Prodigies are said to have accompanied Panacea's death and her
subsequent burial at Ghemme, where a church was erected over her gravesite.
Her cult is attested from the fifteenth century onward.
   Panacea's suffering as depicted in a late fifteenth-century detached
fresco said to have come from a chapel dedicated to her at Quarona:
http://www.quaronasesia.it/SANGIOVANNI/sgiov07.jpg




Happy reading,
Terri Morgan
--
"I'd gladly turn the other cheek,
but my tongue is always firmly planted in it."
- Flannery O'Connor

**********************************************************************
To join the list, send the message: join medieval-religion YOUR NAME
to: [log in to unmask]
To send a message to the list, address it to:
[log in to unmask]
To leave the list, send the message: leave medieval-religion
to: [log in to unmask]
In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
[log in to unmask]
For further information, visit our web site:
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/medieval-religion.html

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager