JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  March 2011

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION March 2011

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Feasts and Saints of the Day: March 31

From:

Terri Morgan <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 31 Mar 2011 00:40:44 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (50 lines)

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Today, March 31  is the feast of:

Amos (8th century BCE) was a shepherd near Bethlehem who became one of the minor prophets. According to the Roman martyrology, he was killed by having an iron bar knocked through his head.

Acacius Agathangelos (d. c251) was bishop of Phrygian Antioch. His flock gave him the nickname "agathangelos" (good angel) because of all his good works. He was such a good influence that according to legend not a single Christian in his diocese denied his or her faith during the Decian persecution. Acacius himself was arrested, and according to what may be authentic acta engaged in a long and surprisingly benign discussion of faith with the Roman governor. At the end of it, the governor sent the transcript to Decius; Decius was impressed, too - he promoted the governor to a higher position, and pardoned Acacius. His cult is popular in the orthodox churches.

Balbina (4th century?) There was already a cemetery and a church in Rome named after Balbina in the fourth century. Balbina apparently endowed the church, and she herself was honoured there later as a saint. The author of a later vita made Balbina the daughter of Quirinus, reporting that they were both martyred in Rome.

Benjamin the Deacon (d. c421) was caught in the second wave of anti-Christian persecution in Persia. When Yezdigerd became king, he ended Shapur II's persecution, and there were twelve years of peace. But an overly zealous bishop then burned down an important fire temple and refused to rebuild it, so the bishop was executed and anti-Christian persecution started up again and continued for 40 years. Benjamin, a deacon, was flogged and imprisoned for a year for preaching Christianity during this time. He was released at the request of the eastern Roman emperor on the promise that he’d not preach – but then started preaching again. Arrested a second time, he was tortured by having reeds thrust under his nails and then was impaled on a knotty stake so it would take longer to reach a vital organ.

Renovatus, bishop of Merida (about 633) is chiefly memorable for his treatment of a gluttonous monk in his monastery at Cauliana, of which he was abbot. Indeed this is the only incident of his life recorded, and it is given at considerable length.

Agilolf/Agilulf/Agilolph of Köln (d. 752?) became bishop of Köln in 745 or 746. He is documented in a letter from pope St. Zachary as a participant in St. Boniface's synod of 747. In 1062 archbishop Anno II (St. Anno of Köln) translated from Malmédy the relics of a sainted abbot of Stavelot (Stablo)-Malmédy said to have been assassinated for having opposed the succession of Charles Martel (who had been born out of wedlock). The Passio s. Agilolfi and other eleventh-century writings equate these two saints. Henceforth Köln had a martyr-bishop. From the twelfth-century onward Köln has celebrated Agilolf on the date of this translation, July 9. Different dates have been given as his dies natalis. Today, the date used in late medieval expanded versions of Usuard, is Agilof's day of commemoration in the RM.
  In Köln Agilolf's putative relics were housed in the church of Sankt Maria ad Gradus; it was from a lectionary of this church that A.'s Passio was printed in the Acta Sanctorum.  The same church's Agilolph altar, created at Antwerp ca. 1520 and since disassembled, passed much later into the possession of the cathedral chapter of Köln. Here, courtesy of Chris Laning, is a view of a predella panel showing depicting sufferers seeking relief at Agilolf's late medieval shrine: http://www.flickr.com/photos/claning/90424753/
      An expandable view of another panel from this altar is here: http://tinyurl.com/yto7lz

Stephen of Mar Saba (d. 794) was the nephew of St. John Damascene, who introduced the young boy to monastic life beginning at age 10. When he reached 24, Stephen served the community in a variety of ways, including guest master. After some time he asked permission to live a hermit's life. The answer from the abbot was yes and no: Stephen could follow his preferred lifestyle during the week, but on weekends he was to offer his skills as a counsellor. Stephen placed a note on the door of his cell: "Forgive me, Fathers, in the name of the Lord, but please do not disturb me except on Saturdays and Sundays. “Despite his calling to prayer and quiet, Stephen displayed uncanny skills with people and was a valued spiritual guide.  When the hegumen died a miraculous light flooding Stephen's cell made it clear that he, who had been ordained priest, was to succeed him. As hegumen Stephen continued to live eremitically. A forerunner of St. Francis of Assisi, Stephan loved all of God's creation and was kind not only to people but also to many forms of animate nature, including earthworms which he would attempt to remove from places where people might tread on them. Leontius credits him with various miracles. Stephen died two years before Arabs massacred the monks of his community.
   His biographer and disciple wrote about Stephen: "Whatever help, spiritual or material, he was asked to give, he gave. He received and honored all with the same kindness. He possessed nothing and lacked nothing. In total poverty he possessed all things." 

Guido/Guy of Pomposa (d. 1046) According to his eleventh-century Vita by a monk of Pomposa, Guy was born c970, the first-born son of well-to-do parents near Ravenna who gave him a good education. Offered two possible brides, he chose neither and instead changed from rich garb to poor and slipped away to Rome, where he entered Holy Orders. He returned to Ravenna, lived for three years as a hermit, and then moved on to the great abbey of Pomposa in the Po Delta in Emilia, where he rose through all the important offices to become abbot. One of his monks there was the musicologist Guide of Arezzo. The Vita credits Guy with serving for 40 years as abbot, being an able administrator and with the operation of several miracles. He was a scholarly sort who encouraged biblical exegesis, and can also claim sanctity because in his later years he was unjustly persecuted by the bishop of Ravenna. At certain seasons of the year he was accustomed to withdraw to a cell about three miles from his abbey, where he lived in such unbroken abstinence and devotion that he seemed to be sustained by fasting and prayer. He had such a reputation for holiness that Emperor Henry III sent for him for advice. But Guido fell ill and died near Parma. Parma and Pomposa fought over who would get his remains, so the emperor settled their quarrel by taking them himself and depositing them in Speyer, where Guy became the patron saint. Today is his dies natalis. 
   Guy's tenure is regarded as the high point in the history of the abbey at Pomposa, founded in 523. In his time the abbey, which then was located on an island in the delta, was an independent state within the empire, controlling a large territory stretching back from the Adriatic between the Po and the Gauro and endowed with numerous dependencies elsewhere. He attracted so many disciples that they had to build another monastery.  His abbey went into a decline in the later Middle Ages and was suppressed in 1663. In 1802 what was then left of it was secularized. In the late nineteenth century the abbey became an Italian national monument and in the 1920s restoration began on the surviving buildings.  That work continues today.  
   The refectory has a view of Guy transforming water into wine right there at Pomposa: http://www.pomposa.com/frefettorio5.htm
   And here is Guy again: http://www.pomposa.com/images/abbazia3.jpg

Jeanne of Toulouse (blessed) (d. 1286) Jeanne was a noblewoman affiliated with the Carmelite order, being introduced to it by St. Simon Stock. She remained in her parental home training upcoming Carmelite friars; thus she is considered the first Carmelite tertiary. When her body was translated in 1805, a manuscript prayer book was found beside her.

Daniel the Camaldolese (d. 1411) had a cult not formally approved. Daniel was a German merchant. In c1400, during a business trip to Venice, he became a Camaldolese monk and remained in a monastery on the isle of Murano. In 1411 he was shot in his cell in the monastery by robbers. A pilgrimage developed to his tomb.

Bonaventure of Forli (blessed) (d. 1491) Bonaventure Tornielli was a native of Forli (Italy) who became a Servite at the age of 37. He was an eloquent preacher who preached a major revival throughout the Papal States and the Kingdom of Naples. He was elected vicar general of the order in 1488. 


Happy reading,
Terri Morgan
--
We are all Dumbos, and life is full of Magic Feathers. To reject them makes our life thinner. – Allen (azlawyer)

**********************************************************************
To join the list, send the message: join medieval-religion YOUR NAME
to: [log in to unmask]
To send a message to the list, address it to:
[log in to unmask]
To leave the list, send the message: leave medieval-religion
to: [log in to unmask]
In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
[log in to unmask]
For further information, visit our web site:
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/medieval-religion.html

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager