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ACADEMIC-STUDY-MAGIC  September 2010

ACADEMIC-STUDY-MAGIC September 2010

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Subject:

Re: Robert Heinlein's 2nd Wife Is Driving Me Crazy

From:

Iona Miller <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Society for The Academic Study of Magic <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 31 Aug 2010 18:20:16 -0700

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (314 lines)

On the Heinlein, Parsons, Hubbard interface:
http://firehead.org/~pturing/occult/grok/thelema.htm

Whence Came the Stranger:
Tracking the Metapattern of Stranger in a Strange Land
By Adam Walks Between Worlds, (c) 1993

In 1961 Robert Anson Heinlein published a novel about a young Martian named Valentine Michael Smith. The book, Stranger in a Strange Land (Stranger), burst from its modest initial reception in science fiction circles to become one of the most influential works of the 20th century. Its concepts molded the critical thinking of many important social movements and paved the way for that astonishing period of social, religious, and sexual reclamation that is misleadingly dubbed "the 60s."1 Arriving, as it did, at a nadir of American free thought and at a peak of media censorship, Stranger's publication was a minor miracle and its later mainstream success has always been considered a first class fluke. It became the first science novel to penetrate public consciousness since the days of Verne and Wells and initiated an unprecedented era of respectability for science fiction that opened the door for the Star Trek, 2001 and Star Wars. Stranger also marked a
 radical departure of form, not only for the author, but for American
thought and expression in general. Stranger was the quintessence that
transformed the nation's repressively conformist, post-war paranoia into
the overtly sensual, erudite, cynical optimism that epitomized the years
preceding the Reagan administration.Entire volumes could be devoted to the influence of Stranger on fields as diverse (or convergent) as religion, physics, computer science, philosophy, government, anthropology, ecology and the occult. Movies, songs, and books quickly reflected its major themes. Grok, Heinlein's Martian neologism for deep understanding, became a household word. Every form of media, art, and
science paid its respects to Heinlein's creation. The Church of All Worlds and the Covenant of The Mithril Star were two of many groups that formed around Stranger's principles and inspiration.


Blue skies,
Iona Miller, [log in to unmask]
http://ionamiller.weebly.com
"May Your Lead Turn to Gold"


--- On Tue, 8/31/10, ACADEMIC-STUDY-MAGIC automatic digest system <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> From: ACADEMIC-STUDY-MAGIC automatic digest system <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: ACADEMIC-STUDY-MAGIC Digest - 30 Aug 2010 to 31 Aug 2010 (#2010-192)
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Date: Tuesday, August 31, 2010, 4:00 PM
> There are 5 messages totaling 593
> lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>   1. Robert Heinlein's 2nd Wife Is Driving Me Crazy...
> (5)
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Mon, 30 Aug 2010 17:30:16 -0700
> From:    Pitch <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Robert Heinlein's 2nd Wife Is Driving Me
> Crazy...
>
>   Aloha,
>
> First, thanx for all the pointers and sources. List
> members
> are always helpful and well-informed about just about any
> question or puzzlement.
>
> I will look at as many of those sources as I can.
>
> Second, I'm only part way through the book. There looks to
> be chapters talking about L. Ron Hubbard and Jack Parsons
> coming up. I'm on watch for any pertinent info.
>
> FWIW, Robert Heinlein appears to be the one who suggested
> that Hubbard (whom he knew from science fiction writing
> and wartime service) look up Parsons (whom he knew from
> amateur rocketry) in LA. Late in WWII, Hubbard was being
> sent to Southern California on some sort of limited Naval
> duty.
> Heinlein apparently thought that two such characters
> might get on together.
>
> The book makes a confident declaration that Robert
> Heinlein
> was not an applied occultist or adherent of any occult
> lodge
> or tradition. He was just curious about occulture topics.
>
> Third, right now, I'm mostly leaning to what Khem Caigen
> calls "homebrew witchcraft traditions." I can imagine that
> Leslyn might have devised her own or taken up a trad
> that she had somehow learned via association with her
> Theosophist mother.
>
> Even though the book characterizes her mother as "toxic"
> and
> their relationship as strained.
>
> In addition, the book so offers no mention of Leslyn being
> involved in any sort of occult activities, aside from the
> reference in my earlier post.
>
> What vexes me--out of proportion--is the brief description
> of Leslyn's activities as somehow much more Neo-Pagan
> in nature than any time line I know of allows.
>
> Musing Neo-Pagan Witchcraft In LA During The 30s??? Rose,
>
> Pitch
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Tue, 31 Aug 2010 15:29:08 +0200
> From:    Richard Turner <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Robert Heinlein's 2nd Wife Is Driving Me
> Crazy...
>
> Herzlichen Dank für Ihre eMail an [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>.
> Wir kümmern uns gerne umgehend um Ihr Anliegen und werden
> Ihnen
> schnellstmöglich eine ausführliche Antwort zukommen
> lassen.
>
> Thank you for your eMail to [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>.
> We will take care of your concerns immediately and send you
> a detailed answer.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Tue, 31 Aug 2010 09:46:47 -0700
> From:    Pitch <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Robert Heinlein's 2nd Wife Is Driving Me
> Crazy...
>
>   Aloha,
>
> On 8/30/2010 1:23 PM, Khem Caigan wrote:
> > The ductus goes something like this:
> >
> > [Yeats-> *Four Jewels*-> Ella Young-> *Shasta
> Fellowship*->
> > Halcyon, California-> *Theosophists* -> (Leslyn
> MacDonald
> > Heinlein(?))] <- "Early" Californian
> Neopaganism(?)
> I don't think that I'm alone among San Francisco Bay Area
> Neo-Pagans in considering Ella Young (thanks to her years
> lecturing at UC Berkeley during the 1930s) as an overall
> influence and respected predecessor. (Some suspect that
> she and a few colleagues may have had something to do
> with the siting of features and one time landscaping of
> the campus in order to harmoniously reveal energy points
> and flows, for instance.)
>
> Although, to be clear, her influence on folks like me who
> grew
> up in the SF Bay Area decades later, was indirect. A
> lasting
> vibe among a great buzz of vibes.
>
> As for how various (sadly not much described in the book)
> elements of some sort of Northern European witchcraft
> MIGHT have come to Leslyn Heinlein before 1932, this
> routing
> offers one possibility.
>
> At the same time--and here I'm speculating based on the
> history of Theosophy in Southern California--other routes
> via other unidentified "witchcraft" types are also
> possible.
>
> For instance, a Theosophy temple existed in Los Angeles.
> In addition, there was another Theosophy-based intentional
> community, Lomaland, down San Diego way.
>
> Let me add that the pointer to Theosophy's role in the
> dissemination of some form of European witchcraft into
> California's burgeoning early 20th Century occulture does
> make sense to me. By the time that I graduated from high
> school (late 60s), I had picked up a bunch of
> Theosophically-
> sourced notion and outlooks--without having paid any
> specific attention to Theosophy as an organization or
> spiritual enterprise. They were fairly widespread in the
> popular culture.
>
> Lastly, and as sort of an side, I gotta say that, going by
> the Heinlein bio, Robert and Leslyn Heinlein were not
> part of the "intensely yet nebulously felt as spiritual"
> environmentalism (expressed by John Muir, Ansel Adams,
> Ella Young, Henry Cowell, and Kenneth Rexroth, for
> instance)
> that provides a powerful current in California occulture.
> I figure that whatever sort of witchcraft Leslyn did
> practice,
> it did not "come" to her--as it did "come" to me as a
> youngster--from the land and its energies. Her take,
> I think, was human-centered.
>
> Musing If Celtic Wonder Tales Don't Make You Imagine
> Magic,
> What Could? Rose,
>
> Pitch
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Tue, 31 Aug 2010 10:34:35 -0700
> From:    Pitch <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Robert Heinlein's 2nd Wife Is Driving Me
> Crazy...
>
>   Aloha,
>
> On 8/30/2010 11:46 AM, Samuel Wagar wrote:
> > And in "Sex and Rockets ; The Occult World of Jack
> Parsons" (a great
> > little biography ) by John Carter, Heinlein's
> friendship with Jack
> > Parsons, the head of the OTO branch, Agape Lodge, is
> mentioned. With
> > the amount of science fiction authors in and around
> the OTO at the
> > time (notably L. Ron Hubbard) this is not surprising.
> > So Leslyn Heinlein might have been involved as well.
> Interestingly (but sorta pointing away from the O.T.O.),
> the Heinlein bio makes it pretty clear that the Heinleins
> were not active occultists with lodge or organization
> affiliations. The book does mention, more or less
> incidentally,
> that Robert had attended _one_ Gnostic Mass celebrated
> by Parsons and his O.T.O. lodge (I assume at Parsons'
> Pasadena house).
>
> Besides, the timing is off. The puzzling passage about
> Leslyn Heinlein doing witchcraft refers to the mid-to-late
> 1930s. Parsons did not get the O.T.O. Pasadena Lodge
> (and do those infamous workings) until 1942 and after.
>
> But the Heinleins spent WWII working for the Navy in
> Philadelphia.
>
> Robert Heinlein was an "intellectual" occultist,
> who enjoyed reading and ruminating on the occult, but
> nowhere is there any indication that he did much
> occultism.
>
> So far as I have got in the book, it seems that Leslyn
> was the more active occultist, so far as the two did
> occultism.
>
> And, except for Hubbard and Parsons, it doesn't appear
> that any other of the Southern California SF writers
> were much involved with O.T.O. style occultism.
>
> Musing Rocket Scientists Who Invoke & Seek To Beget
> The Moonchild! Rose,
>
> Pitch
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Tue, 31 Aug 2010 19:45:08 +0100
> From:    Peter Edwards <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Robert Heinlein's 2nd Wife Is Driving Me
> Crazy...
>
> Hi Pitch, try contacting Nigel Bourne, the well known
> Alecandrian Wiccan,
> who corresponded with Heinlein after seeing the tell-tale
> signs in his book
> "Job" and could give you some primary source material.
> Heinlein relayed some
> facts about his involvement in 1960s US Wicca and you might
> find out more.
> Regards, Peter
>
> On Aug 31, 2010 6:35 PM, "Pitch" <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
>
> Aloha,
>
> On 8/30/2010 11:46 AM, Samuel Wagar wrote: > > And in
> "Sex and Rockets ; The
> Occult World of Jack P...
> Interestingly (but sorta pointing away from the O.T.O.),
> the Heinlein bio makes it pretty clear that the Heinleins
> were not active occultists with lodge or organization
> affiliations. The book does mention, more or less
> incidentally,
> that Robert had attended _one_ Gnostic Mass celebrated
> by Parsons and his O.T.O. lodge (I assume at Parsons'
> Pasadena house).
>
> Besides, the timing is off. The puzzling passage about
> Leslyn Heinlein doing witchcraft refers to the mid-to-late
> 1930s. Parsons did not get the O.T.O. Pasadena Lodge
> (and do those infamous workings) until 1942 and after.
>
> But the Heinleins spent WWII working for the Navy in
> Philadelphia.
>
> Robert Heinlein was an "intellectual" occultist,
> who enjoyed reading and ruminating on the occult, but
> nowhere is there any indication that he did much
> occultism.
>
> So far as I have got in the book, it seems that Leslyn
> was the more active occultist, so far as the two did
> occultism.
>
> And, except for Hubbard and Parsons, it doesn't appear
> that any other of the Southern California SF writers
> were much involved with O.T.O. style occultism.
>
> Musing Rocket Scientists Who Invoke & Seek To Beget
> The Moonchild! Rose,
>
> Pitch
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of ACADEMIC-STUDY-MAGIC Digest - 30 Aug 2010 to 31 Aug
> 2010 (#2010-192)
> ***************************************************************************
>

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