JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  April 2010

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION April 2010

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

saints of the day 26. April

From:

John Dillon <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 26 Apr 2010 16:29:18 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (96 lines)

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Today (26. April) is the feast day of:

1)  Anacletus, pope (d. ca. 91).  A. was the second bishop of Rome after St. Peter.  Both this form of his name and the (pseudo-)Hieronymian Martyrology's 'Aninclitus' are latinizations of Greek 'Anenkletos' ('Blameless'), the form given by such Greek writers as St. Irenaeus of Lyon and Eusebius of Caesarea.  He is also called Cletus, as in his commemoration in the Roman canon of the Mass.  In the Liberian Catalogue, followed by the _Liber Pontificalis_, he appears as two popes, Cletus and Anacletus.  The RM calls him Cletus.  According to the _Liber Pontificalis_, A. erected a _memoria_ over Peter's tomb (this is widely disbelieved; the similarly named pope St. Anicetus is a more likely choice) and was himself buried nearby.  The tradition that A. died a martyr seems to be without foundation.

According to Hincmar of Reims' later ninth-century _Epistula de Sanctis Dionysio, Sanctino, et Antonino_ (BHL 2185), an apparently original contribution to the legends of the Petrine establishment of the church in Gaul under St. Dionysius (Denys) of Paris, D. sent two of his disciples, St. Sanctinus, bishop of Meaux and the latter's friend St. Antoninus, to Rome to report on the ongoing evangelization of Gaul.  Shown here, from a copy of Ivo of Saint-Denis' earlier fourteenth-century _Vita et Passio Sancti Dionysii _ (Paris, BnF, ms. Français 2092, fol. 82v) are those two saints reporting orally to A. (who in this text is actually called Anacletus and not Cletus):
http://tinyurl.com/22jr5mj 

A. appears to have been a saint of the Regno.  At Ruvo di Puglia (BA) in Apulia a subterranean oratory beneath the present Chiesa del Purgatorio has been called the Grotta di San Cleto since at least the seventeenth century, when according to the ecclesiastical historian Ferdinando Ughelli the following inscription, written in crude "gothic" letters and seemingly indicating the presence of a relic, was legible on one of its walls: "Cives Ruborum nolite timere, Ego sum Cletus Rubensis Episcopus, Tertius post Petrum, qui pro vobis oro" ("Do not fear, citizens of Ruvo.  I am Cletus of Ruvo, bishop, third after Peter, who prays for you").  An illustrated, Italian-language account of this space, which holds a Roman-period cistern, is here:
http://www.enec.it/Cripte/Ruvo/Luogo.htm

On the theory that A. (as Cletus) was the town's patron saint before the present one (San Biagio, i.e. St. Blaise), some have thought that the unidentified seated figure above the rose window on Ruvo's thirteenth-century cathedral (finished in 1237 and since rebuilt) is really he.  Views of this putative A. are here:
http://tinyurl.com/3dq5gd


2)  Basil of Amasea (d. ca. 322).  B. (Basileus, Basilius) is recorded in St. Jerome's Latin-language version of Eusebius' _Chronicon_ as a bishop of Amasea in Pontus (also Amaseia; today's Amasya in north central Turkey) martyred under Licinius in the 275th Olympiad (321-324).  He was one of the signatories of the acta of councils held at Ancyra and Neocaesarea in 314.  B. has a probably later fourth-century Laudatio by Asterius of Amasea (BHG 240) and a legendary Passio (two forms: BHG 239 and 239b) that a) has him singled out for persecution because he had given shelter to a young woman of Christian faith who had been in the service of Licinius' wife and with whom Licinius had fallen in lust and b) relates that after he had been executed by decapitation at Nicomedia his head and the remainder of his body, which had been thrown into the sea separately, were miraculously recovered together by fishermen near Sinope and from there brought to Amasea.


3)  Trudpert (d. ca. 600, supposedly).  T. is the rather legendary saint of the monastery named for him at today's Münstertal im Schwarzwald in Baden-Württemberg, about twenty kilometers south of Freiburg im Breisgau.  According to his earliest Vita (BHL 8329), he was an Irish missionary who settled there as an hermit and was soon murdered by two serfs who were to have been his laborers.  The monastery, which became very wealthy, grew up over what was said to have been T.'s grave.  T. seems never to have graced the pages of the RM.

A twelfth-century cross from St. Trudpert:
http://tinyurl.com/3aclzc
The late thirteenth-century Freiburg Cross in the Hermitage is also from St. Trudpert:
http://hermitagemuseum.org/html_En/03/hm3_10_5a.html
The Hermitage held an exhibition in 2003/04 focusing on the later of those two crosses:
http://tinyurl.com/3ajv94
Also from St. Trudpert is this thirteenth-century set of altar vessels:
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/litu/hod_47.101.26-29.htm


4)  Riquier (Richarius; d. ca. 645).  R. founded the monastery of Celle (Centula; also known as the abbey of Ponthieu) at today's Saint-Riquier (Somme) in Picardy in about 625.  He has a late seventh-century Vita whose reworking by Alcuin in the early ninth century is the subject of an article by Michel Banniard: "Les deux vies de Saint Riquier: du latin médiatique au latin hiératique", _Médiévales_, no. 25 (1993), 45-52.  Some views of the abbey's fifteenth-/early sixteenth-century church, today's abbatiale Saint-Riquier:
http://tinyurl.com/ch88eg
http://tinyurl.com/3cwyaz
http://tinyurl.com/d4cqd7
A deliberately degraded reproduction for the Web of an early nineteenth-century engraving of the church's portal is here:
http://tinyurl.com/2gr2ch
Interior:
http://tinyurl.com/cqrllw
http://tinyurl.com/dlzy9d
http://tinyurl.com/ctmd9m


5)  Paschasius Radbertus (d. ca. 860).  The learned theologian R., a prolific writer, was a monk of Corbie and its abbot for about ten years from ca. 842.  He is probably best known for his _De corpore et sanguine Domini_ with its exposition of the doctrine of the Real Presence, for his commentary on Matthew in twelve books, and for his Marian _De partu Virginis_.  P. was buried in the church of St. John at Corbie.  In 1073, after miracles had been reported at his tomb, he was translated to the abbey's church of St. Peter.  Herewith a view of his tombstone there:
http://tinyurl.com/cvbd35
The opening of P.'s commentary on Lamentations in a manuscript of Austrian origin generally dated to the twelfth century (Baltimore, Walters Art Museum, Ms. 30):
http://www.scielo.org.ar/img/revistas/tmedie/v14//a04f1.jpg
The second column here has the beginning of an extract from P.'s _De corpore et sanguine Domini_ in a manuscript of French origin dated to around 1200 (København, Det Kongelige Bibliotek, GKS 181 2o, fol. 72r):
http://www.kb.dk/permalink/2006/manus/53/eng/72+recto/?var=1


6)  William and Peregrine, venerated at Foggia (d. 11th or 12th cent.).  We know about these two saints of the Regno from a Vita in the form of lections from their incompletely preserved Office from Foggia (BHL 8915) in northern Apulia.  According to this undated text, W. and P. (in Italian, Guglielmo e Pellegrino) were a father and his only son, both wealthy and very devout and living at Antioch on the Orontes.  P., who from childhood had nurtured a desire to see Jerusalem, went there as a pilgrim when had come of age and stayed there, tending the sick in a hospice.  When P. did not return as expected, W. grew concerned and made inquiries that proved unavailing.  He then went to Jerusalem himself, searched anxiously for his son, and fell ill in the process.  He was brought to P.'s hospice, where P. recognized him and they reunited.  They returned to Antioch, where W. sold his possessions and with the proceeds funded the hospice in Jerusalem and established others.

Thus far the Vita as we have it.  From hymns, responsories, and antiphons sent in 1638 by the archpriest of Foggia to the early Bollandists, it appears that W. and P. were held to have come to Foggia, where they lived as hermits, visited the sick, made miraculous cures, and died simultaneously.  Two of those whom they cured are named but not further identified: Riccardus and Maria.  The combination of the first of these names with the Vita's making both W. and P. travelers to Jerusalem conduces to the view that this is a pilgrim-oriented cult of twelfth- or early thirteenth-century origin.  Foggia, which lies close to the Gargano Peninsula with its major shrine of St. Michael the Archangel, was on a route taken by travelers from the north heading to the port cities of Apulia; from the reign of Frederick II onward it has been the chief city of its region, the Capitanata.

W. and P. were accorded an Elevatio in the principal church of Foggia in 1630.  They are secondary patrons of Foggia.

We're not in Foggia very often on this list, so herewith some views of its originally later twelfth-century cattedrale della Beata Maria Vergine Assunta in Cielo, now a co-cathedral of the archdiocese of Foggia-Bovino but prior to the erection of the diocese of Foggia in 1855 merely a collegiate church, albeit a regionally important one.  Built in the 1170s over a late eleventh-century crypt, reworked in the seventeenth century and again in the eighteenth after an earthquake, it still preserves parts of its medieval facade:
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/kqvy6rvxvfjXr0I8PxQFyQ
http://tinyurl.com/28pyswx
http://tinyurl.com/3aykpt8
A brief video showing more of the exterior:
http://www.viaggiareinpuglia.it/multimedia/12/it/Cattedrale---Foggia
A reconstruction of the church's late medieval appearance:
http://tinyurl.com/24epxh2
For comparison, the cathedral of nearby Troia (to whose diocese Foggia formerly belonged):
http://tinyurl.com/2dqerth
http://www.reciproca.it/Turismo/CapitanataFoto/foto/image072.jpg


7)  Dominic and Gregory, venerated "at Besians" (Bl.; d. late 13th or early 14th cent.).  Early modern Dominican sources from Spain make D. and G. (Domingo y Gregorio) priests of their order who preached in the county of Ribagorza in today's Huesca province of Aragón.  While traveling, they were overtaken by a storm and sought shelter for the night under a rock that then collapsed and crushed them in its fall.  A miraculous tolling of bells alerted the people of nearby Perarrúa, who on the following day recovered the bodies of D. and G.  These were brought to the parish church at Besians, where further miracles occurred and a cult grew up.  In the seventeenth century the tombs of D. and G. at Besians were still a pilgrimage destination.  D. and G. were beatified in 1854.  The diocese of Barbastro-Monzón celebrates them on 27. April with an obligatory memorial.

Besians and Perarrúa are now part of the municipality of Perarrúa, whose parish church is the originally later seventeenth-century iglesia de San Martín at Perarrúa.  Besians' own twelfth-century church of San Juán Evangelista is both an empty shell and, along with an originally thirteenth-century bridge across the Ésera, the locality's principal tourist attraction.  Herewith some views of the church:
http://tinyurl.com/65v6xx
and of the bridge:
http://tinyurl.com/6bkeo5


8)  Stephen of Perm (d. 1396).  After making his monastic profession at Rostov Veliky, where he studied Greek and Old Slavonic, the Komi-speaking Russian S. (also Stephen Hrap) became a missionary among the Zyrians, a Finno-Ugric people in the Komi region of the nothern Urals.  He developed for them a script, the Old Permic alphabet, and translated Orthodox texts into Komi.  In 1383 he was appointed the first bishop of Perm, with his seat at his monastic center at Ust-Vym.  S. died while on a trip to Moscow and was buried there in what is now the Kremlin.  His Life by the Epiphanius the Wise (d. ca. 1420) is a monument of Muscovite hagiography.

Best,
John Dillon
(last year's post revised)

**********************************************************************
To join the list, send the message: join medieval-religion YOUR NAME
to: [log in to unmask]
To send a message to the list, address it to:
[log in to unmask]
To leave the list, send the message: leave medieval-religion
to: [log in to unmask]
In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
[log in to unmask]
For further information, visit our web site:
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/medieval-religion.html

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager