JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  March 2010

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION March 2010

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

saints of the day 13. March

From:

John Dillon <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 13 Mar 2010 15:43:40 -0600

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (118 lines)

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Today (13. March) is the feast day of:

1)  Sabinus of Hermopolis (d. ca. 307).  We know about S. from an at least semi-legendary Passio (two versions: BHG 1612 and 1612c).  This makes him a resident of Hermopolis in Egypt (from what's known of S.'s persecutor, the Hermopolis in Upper Egypt, today's Al–Ashmunayn) who during the Great Persecution retreated with fellow Christians into the neighboring countryside.  There he lived in a hut and was kind to a beggar who for two small coins later denounced him to the authorities.  Arrested, S. was interrogated by the governor Arrianus, before whom he maintained the superiority of the Christian religion, and was then condemned.  He underwent various tortures before being killed by drowning in the Nile.  As S. had predicted at the moment of his death, his body was found three days later.  Thus far the Passio.

Byzantine synaxaries and menaia have notices of S. generally according with elements of his Passio.  They commemorate him on 11., 12., or 14. March.  The source from which S. entered the early RM under today's date has not been identified.    

Some views of the re-erected columns of this Hermopolis' fifth-century Christian basilica dedicated to the BVM:
http://tinyurl.com/y8v7qrf
http://tinyurl.com/ydnrr4k
http://tinyurl.com/yc4zlsv

Egyptian huts recur with some frequency in Roman-period Nilotic scenes.  The great mosaic evocation of Egypt in the Museo nazionale in Palestrina has at least two: a small peaked one close to the center of the composition and a larger curved one below it and to the left:
http://tinyurl.com/ykfrp5m
In this schematized view the first of these is a little below the number 10 and the second is under the number 15:
http://tinyurl.com/yj4ogzy


2)  Pientius (d. 560).  P. (in French: Pien, Pient) was bishop of Poitiers between St. Anthemius and St. Pascentius.  Baudonivia tells us in her _Vita sanctae Radegundis_ (BHL 7049) that he supported St. Radegund in her foundation of the monastery of the BVM (later, of the Holy Cross) outside of his city.


3)  Leander of Seville (d. 600 or 601).  An older brother of St. Isidore of Seville, L. saw to I.'s education and preceded him as archbishop.  The leading light of his time in the Visigothic church, he was a friend and correspondent of pope St. Gregory the Great, whom he had gotten to know ca. 580 when they were both in Constantinople.  L. was the author of anti-Arian treatises which have not survived.  He was credited with the conversion to Catholicism both of king Leovigild's son, St. Hermenigild (whose wife and whose mother were both Catholic), and of Leovigild's successor, king Reccared I.  L.'s surviving writings are the closing sermon of the third council of Toledo (589) and a treatise _De institutione virginum et de contemptu mundi_ dedicated to his sister, St. Florentina.

Gregory the Great's _Moralia in Iob_ is addressed to L.  Here's an illumination from an early twelfth-century manuscript (Dijon, Bibliothèque municipale, ms. 168, fol. 5r; dated 1111) showing both of them at the head of G.'s prefatory letter to L.:
http://tinyurl.com/2u7nk5
And here again are the two of them, at the opening of the same letter in another twelfth-century manuscript, Saint-Omer, Bibliothèque de l’agglomération, ms. 12):
http://www.bml.firenze.sbn.it/gregorio/preview/img_schede_big/24.jpg
Expandable views of two other versions of this double portrait are here:
http://tinyurl.com/2rz8t3


4)  Heldradus (also Eldradus; d. ca. 842).  H., who is said to have been of Provençal origin, was the founder, in 726, of the abbey of Sts. Peter and Andrew at Novalesa in today's Piedmont near the Italian side of the pass of Mont-Cenis/Moncenisio.   Devastated by a Muslim raid in about 906, after which the community relocated to its daughter house at Breme in southern Lombardy, the monastery experienced an uptick in its fortunes in the eleventh century, when as a priory of Breme it was substantially rebuilt and also received a written history in the form of its imaginative chronicle, the _Chronicon Novaliciense_.  H. is one of its heroes, but neither from this source nor from his Vita (BHL 2445) do we really learn much about him.  In his time the abbey operated a hospice at the Mt. Cenis Pass and also had a priory further to the southwest at Pagno (fairly close to the Lautaret Pass); their establishment is sometimes attributed to H.

The monastery at Novalesa was secularized in 1798 but was re-acquired by Benedictines in the early 1970s and was resettled in 1972 with monks from Venice.  Restoration of the surviving buildings and conservation/restoration of their surviving mural paintings begain almost immediately.  Some of the results are indicated below.

The abbey in winter:
http://www.abbazianovalesa.org/images/dallalto-n_piero_small.jpg

Chapel of Sts. Heldrad and Nicholas (tenth-/eleventh-century; interior frescoes are of the later eleventh century):
http://www.abbazianovalesa.org/s.Eldrado.htm
http://tinyurl.com/3dj6jr
Apse frescoes:
http://www.abbazianovalesa.org/abside_eldrado.htm
Cycle of St. Heldrad:
http://www.abbazianovalesa.org/ciclo_s.eldrado.htm
Cycle of St. Nicholas:
http://www.abbazianovalesa.org/ciclo_s.nicola.htm

The eighteenth-century abbey chapel retains in its presbytery fragmentary frescoing from its eleventh-century predecessor.  Shown is the stoning of St. Stephen:
http://www.abbazianovalesa.org/images/affresco-s.stef_small.jpg

Twelfth-century fresco in the cloister:
http://www.abbazianovalesa.org/images/01010094_small.jpg

The abbey has several free-standing chapels on the premises.  Shown are:
St. Mary chapel (eighth-century.; restored in the eleventh century):
http://www.abbazianovalesa.org/S_Maria.htm
St. Michael chapel (eighth-/ninth-century):
http://www.abbazianovalesa.org/s.michele.htm
Holy Savior chapel (eleventh-century):
http://www.abbazianovalesa.org/salvatore.htm


5)  Ansovinus (d. 868).  According to his tenth-century Vita (BHL 555) by the monk Eginus or Iginus, A. (who signed himself Ansuinus and whose now customary name form is a back-formation in Latin from Italian Ansovino) came from a family of today's Camerino (MC) in the Marche and was Louis II's confessor.  Elected bishop of Camerino, he at first refused the honor.  When he finally did accept, he did so only after reaching an understanding with the king that he would be exempt from the latter's military service as he had now to serve the church alone.

A. was consecrated bishop by Leo IV.  He took part in a council at Rome called by pope St. Nicholas I in 861.  His Vita ascribes to him several miracles and notes both his generosity to the poor and his peacemaking among factions.  P. died on this day in the eighteenth year of his episcopacy.  His remains now lie in a late fourteenth-century sarcophagus in the crypt of Camerino's early nineteenth-century cathedral.  P.'s cult spread from the diocese of Camerino into other parts of the Marche and into Umbria.  Herewith some views of the originally eleventh-century church of Sant'Ansovino in the _frazione_ of Avacelli in today's Arcevia (AN) in the Marche, starting with the exterior:

A. was consecrated bishop by Leo IV.  He took part in a council at Rome called by pope St. Nicholas I in 861.  His Vita ascribes to him several miracles and notes both his generosity to the poor and his peacemaking among factions.  P. died on this day in the eighteenth year of his episcopacy.  His remains now lie in a late fourteenth-century sarcophagus in the crypt of Camerino's early nineteenth-century cathedral.  P.'s cult spread from the diocese of Camerino into other parts of the Marche and into Umbria.  Herewith some views of the originally eleventh-century church of Sant'Ansovino in the _frazione_ of Avacelli in today's Arcevia (AN) in the Marche, starting with the exterior:
http://www.cadnet.marche.it/arcevia/s_ansovino.html
http://tinyurl.com/2rbgzd
http://www.flickr.com/photos/torebue/1347969360/sizes/l/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cantarlontano/173493631/sizes/o/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cantarlontano/173492571/sizes/o/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/torebue/1347982314/sizes/l/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cantarlontano/173492216/sizes/o/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cantarlontano/173492467/sizes/o/
Interior:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cantarlontano/173493241/sizes/o/
http://www.cadnet.marche.it/arcevia/foto_ans.html
Multiple views with some architectural details and some more glimpses of the scenic Colli Esini in which Arcevia is situated:
http://tinyurl.com/2udnzy

Some views of the originally twelfth-century former Benedictine monastery of Sant'Ansovino outside of Apecchio (PU) in the Marche:
http://tinyurl.com/cvgzkh

The bishop in this panel painting of two saints (the other is obviously St. Jerome) by Carlo Crivelli (d. ca. 1498), active in the Marche in the 1480s and 1490s, used to be identified as St. Augustine of Hippo.  But the institution that possesses it, the Accademia di Venezia, convinced that it was part of a now dismembered triptych from the cathedral of Camerino, now identifies him as today's A.:
http://www.wga.hu/art/c/crivelli/carlo/saints.jpg
previous identification:
http://tinyurl.com/cs8ose
present identification:
http://tinyurl.com/cls6wf


6)  Peter II of Cava (Bl.; d. 1208).  Today's less well known holy person of the Regno was the ninth abbot, according to the standard numeration, of the monastery of the Most Holy Trinity at today's Cava de' Tirreni (SA) in Campania.  But whereas the eighth abbot, Bl. Benincasa (10. January), died early in 1194, P.'s documents only begin in April 1995 and it is not until June 1196 that he appears as _abbas_ rather than _electus_.  In between came a certain Roger, styled in Cava's charters from March to October 1194 as _venerabilis abbas_.  1194 was a year of political uncertainty in the principality of Salerno, as in the kingdom of Sicily as a whole, and it is interesting to note that Roger's ceasing to function as abbot followed closely upon Henry VI's capture and sack of the city of Salerno on 17. September 1194.  Still, the exact relationship between Henry's accession to the throne of Sicily and P.'s accession to the abbatial throne at La Cava remains obscure.

The length of time it took the elected P. to sign himself as _abbas_ suggests that Roger was still alive in the first half of 1196 and that P. may have had to deal with factional opposition within the Cavensian community.  Later tradition called him a peacemaker.  According to John of Capua in 1295, P. was _magis mitis, inimicus utique litis_('greatly mild, consistently an enemy of strife').  His successor, Bl. Balsam (24. November), had to fight to regain abbey property alienated without the community's consent during Roger's time and P.'s.  Like his predecessors -- except perhaps for the unfortunate Roger --, P. was buried in the Crypta Arsicia, the inner grotto of the cave against which the abbey was built.  His cult was immediate.  It was confirmed papally at the level of Beatus in 1928 in a job lot with seven other abbots from Simeon to Leo II.


7)  Agnellus of Pisa (Bl.; d. 1236).  Acting on the instructions of St. Francis, in 1217 the early Franciscan A. lead a party of brothers who established the order's first house in greater Paris.  This was at Saint-Denis.  Later A. opened another house in Paris proper and began his order's association with the university in that city.  In 1224 he was sent to England at the head of another small party to begin making foundations there.  After some time in Canterbury and London A. moved on to Oxford, established his order's school of theology at the university there, and in 1229 appointed Robert Grosseteste to teach in it.  Matthew Paris is our source for Henry III's having employed A. as an intermediary between himself and the rebel Richard Marshal, third Earl of Pembroke.

Despite his associations with universities and with a court, A. is said to have insisted upon living in accordance with the Franciscan ideal of poverty.  His cult was confirmed papally in 1892.  The founder of his order's English Province, he has yet to receive an entry in the _Oxford Dictionary of National Biography_.
 
Best,
John Dillon
(last year's post lightly revised and with the additions of Sabinus of Hermopolis and Agnellus of Pisa)

**********************************************************************
To join the list, send the message: join medieval-religion YOUR NAME
to: [log in to unmask]
To send a message to the list, address it to:
[log in to unmask]
To leave the list, send the message: leave medieval-religion
to: [log in to unmask]
In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
[log in to unmask]
For further information, visit our web site:
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/medieval-religion.html

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JISCMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


WWW.JISCMAIL.AC.UK

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager