JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  January 2010

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION January 2010

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

saints of the day 23. January

From:

John Dillon <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 23 Jan 2010 14:48:08 -0600

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (96 lines)

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Today (23. January) is the feast day of:

1)  Emerentiana (?).  E. (whose name seems really to have been Emerentianes) is a martyr of the great cemetery on the Via Nomentana, where she is cited in the seventh-century pilgrim itineraries for Rome and where in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries fragments of her epitaph were found.  A fifth-century addition to the pseudo-Ambrosian Passio of St. Agnes makes her A.'s foster sister, stoned to death by pagans at A.'s funeral and buried alongside her.  When E. appears in the later sixth-century (ca. 560) procession of virgin martyrs in Ravenna's Sant'Apollinare Nuovo she is at some remove from A.  According to a report in the Annals of Xanten, E.'s body was translated in 851 to Saxony.  In 1123 an altar was dedicated to her at A.'s reputed place of execution in what now is Rome's Piazza Navona.

In 1615 remains said to be E.'s were intended to be enclosed along with those of the by then headless Agnes in a silver reliquary commissioned by Paul V and located in Rome's Sant'Agnese fuori le Mura.  In 1621 this reliquary was placed under the same pope's newly commissioned altar for that church.  When it was rediscovered early in the twentieth century it contained only the skeleton of one headless girl, generally assumed to be A.

In the (pseudo-)Hieronymian Martyrology E. appears under 16. September.  Her feast today, two days after that of her supposed sister, is recorded in the historical martyrologies from Bede onward, in Young Gelasian sacramentaries, and in other early medieval liturgical sources.  In the Mozarabic liturgy Agnes and E. are celebrated jointly on 20. January.  E. is the patron saint of the city of Teruel in Aragón, where she is honored today with a Solemnity.

The British Museum's Royal Gold Cup (later fourteenth-century) depicts E.'s stoning:
http://tinyurl.com/yaxrczq
More on this piece:
http://tinyurl.com/yaxrczq
http://tinyurl.com/ywqzgm
It is a bit depressing to find the British Museum misspelling E.'s name.

The rural church of Santa Emerenziana in Tuenno (TN) in Trentino - Alto Adige's Val di Non is an early sixteenth-century expansion of an originally eleventh- or twelfth-century building.  Herewith some views of its "gothic" exterior:
http://tinyurl.com/2e9qbl
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/226/458879595_4e914600b1_b.jpg
and two views of details, one interior and one exterior:
http://tinyurl.com/ytnt3u
Can anyone point to a reproduction of its fourteenth-century fresco of E. on her deathbed?

Two views of the originally later fifteenth-century (1472) chapelle Sainte-Émerance at La Pouëze (Maine-et-Loire) in Pays-de-la-Loire:
http://tinyurl.com/bj3zx5
http://tinyurl.com/achr4z


2)  Severianus and Aquila (?).  S. and A., husband and wife, are entered under today in the (pseudo-)Hieronymian Martyrology as martyrs of Neocaesarea in Mauretania.  This information is repeated in the historical martyrologies of the Carolingian period with the detail that they were burned to death.  As there is no other record of a Neocaesarea in Mauretania, other venues have been suggested, e.g. Neocaesarea in Pontus and Caesarea in Mauretania.  Aquila is a name ordinarily borne by men; possibly A. was originally called something else (e.g. Acilia).


3)  Clement of Ankara and Agathangelus (d. early 4th cent., supposedly).  The cult of these saints is first attested in a fifth-century sermon dubiously ascribed to St. Proclus of Constantinople.  According to his legendary pre-metaphrastic Passio (BHG 352-352d), C. was a native of Ankara (anciently, Ancyra) who was orphaned early, who as a child showed a strong inclination to asceticism and to acts of charity, who entered the clergy while still very young, and who at the age of twenty became Ankara's bishop.  He was arrested in Diocletian's persecution, was jailed in Ankara for a while, became famous for enduring harsh torments, and was then sent to Rome, where though still a prisoner he continued to attract attention for his constancy under duress and managed to make many converts.

A. was one of C.'s converts at Rome.  He became so devoted to C. that he smuggled himself aboard a ship that was to take C. to the emperor Maximian in Nicomedia.  From there the pair was taken from place to place for many years, enduring trials and torture and ending up in Ankara, where A. was executed by decapitation on a 5. November and where C., whom the local Christians had freed so he could celebrate the Theophany with them, was arrested again and along with the deacons Christopher and Chariton suffered the same fate on a Sunday, 23. January.  C. was laid to rest in the sepulchre already occupied by A.  Thus far C.'s Passio.

C. and A. are the subject of a sermon by the late ninth-/early tenth-century emperor Leo VI (BHG 354) and of a later tenth-century expanded Passio by Symeon Metaphrastes (BHG 353).  In Constantinople they had a martyrial church on the left bank of the Bosporus and were venerated as well in the church of St. Irene (for views, see <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hagia_Irene>) and in a palace chapel built in C.'s honor by the emperor Basil I and housing what was believed to be C.'s head.  In 907 the metropolitan of Ankara sent other relics of C. to patriarch Euthymius of Constantinople, who in turn deposited these in the monastery in the city's Psamathia section.

Byzantine synaxaries give C. and A. a joint feast under today.  In the Greek church A. has also been celebrated on 5. November.  The earlier ninth-century Marble Calendar of Naples' entry for today names A. alone.

C.'s martyrdom as depicted in the earlier fourteenth-century (betw. 1335 and 1350) frescoes of the narthex in the church of the Holy Ascension at the Visoki Dečani monastery near Peć in, depending on one's view of the matter, either the Republic of Kosovo or Serbia's province of Kosovo and Metohija:
http://tinyurl.com/yza8h9v
The caption names C. and A., the honorands of today's feast, but the scene (one  of several illustrating the January calendar) seems rather to depict C.'s execution along with the two deacons.

C. (at left) and A. as depicted in a thirteenth-century menaion from Cyprus (Paris, BnF, ms. Grec 1561, fol. 95r):
http://tinyurl.com/yhotx7g

 
4)  Amasius of Teano (d. ca. 356, supposedly).  Today's less well known saint of the Regno is said in his two untrustworthy Vitae (BHL 354, 355) to have been a priest who fled Arian persecution in the East under Constans I and who arrived in Rome in the pontificate of Julius I (337-52).  Sent to preach at Sora, he was forced out by the Arian party there and proceeded to Teanum Sidicinum, today's Teano (CE) in Campania.  There he was elected bishop and died peacefully.  A. is the second of Teano's three largely legendary early bishops, following St. Paris and preceding St. Urban.  He is also the patron saint of Piedimonte San Germano (FR) in southern Lazio.

In Teano's rebuilt cathedral of San Clemente the present parapet (a replacement for the original, which was badly damaged by a fire in 1608) of the ambo is composed of panels taken from a fourteenth-century funerary monument decorated with images of, among others, Paris, Amasius, and Urban.  Two views of it are here:
http://www.prolocoteano.it/Monumenti/Ambone.htm


5)  Ildefonsus (d. 667).  The church father I. (also Hildefonsus, Hildefunsus, Hildephonsus) has brief Vitae by his seventh- and eighth-century successors in the see of Toledo St. Julian of Toledo (BHL 3917, 3918) and Cixila (Cixilla; BHL 3919). These present him as a well-educated scion of a prominent Visigothic family who contrary to the latter's wishes entered religion at Toledo's monastery of Cosmas and Damian (a.k.a. the Agali monastery), where thanks to his natural gifts and exemplary conduct he rose to be abbot.  In that capacity he is said to have promoted strict fidelity to the Benedictine Rule.  Abbot I. is attested as a participant in the eighth and ninth councils of Toledo.

I. was still only a deacon when he was elected archbishop of Toledo in 657.  The Vitae present him as eloquent and tireless in his attempts to improve public morals.  Of his surviving writings the best known are his _De virginitate Sanctae Mariae_, written fairly early in his career, and the _De viris illustribus_ dealing with the lives and works of fourteen writers of whom seven were archbishops of Toledo.  A new edition of the corpus, edited by Valeriano Yarza Urquiola (theological writings) and Carmen Codoñer Merino (_De viris illustribus_), appeared in 2007 as volume 114A of the Corpus Christianorum's Series latina.

A witness to the _De virginitate Sanctae Mariae_ noteworthy for its illuminations is the Parma Ildefonsus (Parma, Biblioteca Palatina, ms. Parm. 1650), produced at Cluny in about 1100.  Small-scale reproductions of its pages are available for viewing here:
http://www.codicesillustres.com/catalogue/parma_ildefonsus/
Meyer Schapiro's 1964 study of this codex, _The Parma Ildefonsus: A Romanesque Illuminated Manuscript from Cluny, and Related Works_, is available as an e-book to subscribers to the ACLS (American Council of Learned Societies) Humanities E-Book program.

I. reports in the _De virginitate Sanctae Mariae_ that while he was praying before the tomb of Toledo's St. Leocadia the latter arose before him and praised him for his devotion to the BVM (whom I. credited with the operation of this miracle).  This text, which was widely copied in Spain and in southern France from the tenth to thirteenth centuries, was used at for liturgical readings on the feast of the Annunciation.  The French poet Gautier de Coinci, who had a relic of L. that he believed had formerly belonged to I., included the apparition in his earlier thirteenth-century _Miracles de Nostre Dame_.  Here's the scene as depicted in an earlier fourteenth-century (ca. 1330-1340) copy of that text (Paris, BnF, ms. Nouvelle acquisition française 24541, fol. 21r):
http://tinyurl.com/ya7guu4
For those with access to JSTOR, David Raizman's article "A Rediscovered Illuminated Manuscript of St. Ildefonsus's _De Virginitate Beatae Mariae_ in the Biblioteca Nacional in Madrid", _Gesta_ 26 (1987), 37-46, has on p. 41 a black-and-white image of that manuscript's illumination of I. cutting a piece of L.'s veil while the saint sits upright in her open tomb (the ms., which Raizman assigns to the early thirteenth century, is Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional, MS 21546).
 
Toledo was taken by Muslims in 711.  In 1260 I.'s putative remains, supposed to have been brought north to prevent their desecration, were the subject of an Inventio at Zamora (accounts: BHL 3923, 3924).  These are now housed in Zamora's originally eleventh-century iglesia arciprestal de San Pedro y San Ildefonso, some views of which are here:
http://tinyurl.com/yftj5h8
In June 2007 these relics were brought temporarily to Toledo for a celebration of the fourteenth centenary of I.'s birth.  Herewith a number of brief videos of I.'s reliquary chest being paraded through the city, brought into the cathedral of Toledo, and venerated there:
http://tinyurl.com/yfgksjr


6)  Maimbodus of Domnipetra (d. 9th cent.?).  M. (in French, Maimboeuf) is a poorly documented saint of Besançon and vicinity.  According to his brief, undated Passio (BHL 5176) he was a young and very pious Irishman of wealth, social standing, and physical beauty who, coming to the view that these attributes were an impediment to his soul's salvation, left his parents, dressed meanly, and crossed over to the European mainland, where he traveled from one pilgrimage site to another, mortifying his flesh, vivifying his spirit, and resisting diabolic temptation.

After having visited the shrines of saints in different parts of Lotharingia M. stayed as the guest of a nobleman in Burgundy who offered him numerous gifts including a pair of very fine gloves.  M. accepted only the gloves.  At a place called Domnipetra he was set upon and murdered by robbers who had inferred from the gloves that he had money.  As he was dying M. pardoned his killers.

M. was buried in Domnipetra's church of St. Peter.  Miracles occurred at his grave and a martyr cult arose.  After some passage of time, and at the request of a count Adso in whose territory Domnipetra lay, Berengar, archbishop of Besançon (from which Domnipetra is said to have been eight miles distant, thus seemingly ruling out various localities now called Dampierre as the site of M.'s murder) translated the saint to Montbéliard, where his relics continued to effect miracles.  Thus far the Passio.  M.'s date of death is inferred from those of Berengar's episcopacy (895-918).

In the Passio M. is said to have dressed as an Irishman.  Since the Passio elsewhere underscores differences between appearance and reality, it might be worth considering that his name as transmitted is Frankish (cf. the seventh-century St. Maimbodus or Magnobodus of Angers and the eighth-century St. Meginbodus of the Buraburg).  Accounts of Irish missionaries in Francia sometimes include M. among their number.  But the Passio, which is our sole source for who he was, presents him merely as an ascetic pilgrim.

Best,
John Dillon
(last year's post revised and with the additions of Clement of Ankara and Agathangelus and Ildefonsus)

**********************************************************************
To join the list, send the message: join medieval-religion YOUR NAME
to: [log in to unmask]
To send a message to the list, address it to:
[log in to unmask]
To leave the list, send the message: leave medieval-religion
to: [log in to unmask]
In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
[log in to unmask]
For further information, visit our web site:
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/medieval-religion.html

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager