JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  January 2010

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION January 2010

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

saints of the day 8. January

From:

John Dillon <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 8 Jan 2010 13:34:03 -0600

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (90 lines)

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Today (8. January) is the feast day of:

1)  Severinus of Noricum (d. ca. 482).  According to what is practically the only source for S. in his lifetime, Eugippius' _Commemoratorium vitae s. Severini_, this future saint of the Regno appeared in Noricum ripense and in eastern Raetia (the Danube valley area of today's Austria and Lower Bavaria) at some time after the death of Attila the Hun.  He had been a hermit further to the east (if this is so, probably in Pannonia) but now he was active in establishing small monasteries in the vicinity of Roman towns and in tending to the spiritual and political welfare of the Roman populace, no longer protected by the Empire and pressured on all sides by unfriendly and often openly hostile Germanic peoples.  He died peacefully at his monastery at Favianis (today's Mautern an der Donau).  A page on Roman-period Favianis is here:
http://www.oeai.at/eng/inland/mautern.html

Personally very ascetic and credited with miracles, S. is said to have foretold that the remaining Romans would have to leave the area (under the circumstances, perhaps not such a tough guess).  When in 488 Odoacer did organize an evacuation into Italy, the monks of Favianis, one of whom was Eugippius, took their saint's body with them.  For a while they resided on a height generally considered to have been in the Montefeltro (in today's Marche near that region's border with the Romagna).  During the papacy of Gelasius I (492-96), they moved, taking S. with them, to the seaside property of Lucullanum just outside of Naples (as it was then; the place is well within today's city, at the promontory of Pizzofalcone).  There Eugippius organized a new monastery and there, in 511, he finished his account of S.

In 902, it is thought, S.'s relics were translated under the threat of Muslim raids to the safety of a new monastery inside Naples itself.  In short order (and after the translation from Misenum of the supposed remains of one of St. Januarius' companions in martyrdom), this foundation became known as that of Saints Severinus and Sos(s)ius.  S. was medievally a patron of Naples and from there his cult spread widely in mainland southern Italy.  At least four towns in the territory of the former Regno take or once took their names from S., sometimes indirectly: San Severino Mercato (SA), San Severino di Centola (SA), San Severino Lucano (PZ), and, formerly also a San Severino, San Severo (FG).  A later fifteenth-century altarpiece from S.'s monastery in Naples, portraying him in the center panel of the lower register as a mitred abbot, is now in Naples' Museo Nazionale di Capodimonte.  Here's a view:
http://www.aiwaz.net/gallery/gi867c127

In 1806 Santi Severino e Sos(s)io was included in the act secularizing the kingdom's monasteries.  In the following year S.'s relics were translated to their present abode, the thirteenth-century church of San Sos(s)io at the nearby town of Fratta, today's Frattamaggiore (NA).  An exterior view, showing that building's early modern facade (rebuilt in the nineteenth century) and belltower, is here:
http://tinyurl.com/yf7mbom
Some interior views of this Italian national monument (both from before the disastrous fire that gutted it in 1945 and from after the medievalizing reconstruction that followed) will be found lower down on this page:
http://www.iststudiatell.org/fratta%20montanaro/sossio.htm
Other views (expandable) are here:
http://trionfo.altervista.org/Monumenti/frattasossio.htm

North of the Alps, S. is a patron of Bavaria and of the Austrian diocese of Linz.  Dedicated to him at Passau is a medieval church built over a late antique one thought to have been the extramural basilica that S. is said to have erected here.  In its present state it is probably later fifteenth-century with later modifications; remains of Ottonian date are said to exist in the nave.  Here are a couple of views:
http://tinyurl.com/2z8ra2
http://tinyurl.com/2yfejg
A Roman-period funerary monument now serving this church as a font for holy water.
http://tinyurl.com/v4bmg
A partial view of the church's fifteenth-century statue of S.:
http://www.stseverin.at/severin/kirche/heiligerseverin.php
This nearby city gate from 1412 is also named for S:
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bild:Severinstor_Passau.jpg

Bibliographic information on Knoell's CSEL edition of Eugippius' _Vita sancti Severini_ (1886) and on Mommsen's edition of the same work in the MGH (1898) will be found here:
http://www.tertullian.org/fathers/severinus_03_appendix.htm
On the same page are a text and an English-language translation of a medieval Sapphic hymn in honor of S. as patron of Naples transmitted in a hymnary that until relatively recently was thought to have come from the monastery of Santi Severino and Sossio at Naples but is now considered to be of central Italian (Roman/Umbrian) origin.


2)  Maximus of Pavia (d. 514).  M. was bishop of Pavia between St. Epiphanius (d. 496) and St. Ennodius (d. 521).  The latter while yet deacon wrote two brief orations on his behalf (_dictiones_ 3 and 4).  In the thirteenth century Pavia celebrated M. on 9. January.  A tradition preserved in the fourteenth-century _Cronaca dei re lombardi e dei vescovi di Pavia_ made him the founder of a church of San Giovanni in cemeterio (presumably the originally eighth-century and now destroyed San Giovanni in Borgo), where he and other late antique and early medieval bishops of Pavia were laid to rest.


3)  Nathalan (d. later 7th cent.?).  N. is a very poorly attested local saint of Deeside in today's Aberdeenshire, where late and unreliable tradition has him found several churches, places his death in 452, and has him buried at Tullich.  One of the places where he is reputed to have founded a church is the site, near Cowie Castle in the town of Stonehaven, of the now abandoned chapel of St. Mary and of St. Nathalan (a.k.a Cowie Church or Cowie Chapel), consecrated in 1276.  Here's a view:
http://tinyurl.com/8bx88d
An illustrated account of trhe building's architectural features is here:
http://tinyurl.com/99kc6o


4)  Gudula (d. late 7th or very early 8th cent.?).  The virgin G. (in Latin, also Gudila, Guodila; in Dutch, Goedele, Goele; in French, Gudule, Goule) is a popular saint of Brabant with a rather legendary mid-eleventh-century Vita by Hubert of Brabant (BHL 3684).  According to Hubert, G. was the daughter of a count Witger and of St. Amalberga, was the sister of Sts. Pharaildis, Reinildis, and Emebert bishop of Cambrai, and the relative of yet other saints, not least of whom was her cousin Gertude of Nivelles, by whom she was educated.  After Gertrude's death she lived piously and very ascetically with her parents at Hamme in Brabant, where she resisted diabolic temptation, died, and was buried _non sine miraculis_.

Still according to Hubert, a few years later G.'s wonder-working relics were translated to a church of the Holy Savior at nearby Moorsel, where later she was venerated by Charlemagne, who founded in that town a women's monastery dedicated to her.  In the later tenth century, the monastery at Moorsel having been devastated by barbarians, G.'s relics were translated to Brussels' church of St. Gaugeric (a.k.a. Gorik, Géry), again _non sine miraculis_.  Thus far this Vita.  In about 1047 G.'s putative remains were moved to Brussels' collegiate church of St. Michael, shortly thereafter known as that of (St. Michael and) St. Gudula.

The opening sentence of G.'s notice in the January volume of Butler's _Lives of the Saints_ in its revision by Paul Burns (Burns & Oates; Liturgical Press, 1995; pp. 59-60) reads: "She is the patron saint of Brussels, where the great church of Sainte-Gudule, often mistaken for a cathedral, is dedicated to her."  Apart from its perhaps unintentional swipe at Brussels' protector St. Michael ("the patron saint" implies that G. alone is Brussels' patron), this utterance may be thought misleading in its failure to indicate that "often mistaken" will have been true for past time only: the church in question has been a cathedral since 1962.  Herewith some views, etc. of this mostly thirteenth- to fifteenth-century pile, whose eleventh-century crypt (excavated since 1991) slightly pre-dates the arrival of G.'s relics:
http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kathedraal_van_Sint-Michiel_en_Sint-Goedele
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Michael_and_Gudula_Cathedral
http://www.trabel.com/brussel/brussels-ch-churchstmichael.htm
http://tinyurl.com/7rfy3r
A ground plan and a brief architectural history are here:
http://tinyurl.com/9gyyg5
A multipage, illustrated, English-language guide to the crypt begins here:
http://tinyurl.com/8gub96         
Four virtual tours of the building (not including the crypt) are available here:
http://bruxelles.arounder.com/cathedral/
This expandable view of a later fifteenth-century painting, by the Master of the View of Saint Gudula, of the Preaching of St. Gaugeric, shows one of the church's towers not yet completed:
http://www.worldvisitguide.com/oeuvre/O0018284.html


5)  Wulfsige (d. 1002).  We know about the Englishman W. (also Wulfsin, Wulsin; to the Bollandists, Vulsinus) chiefly from a brief Vita by Goscelin of St.-Bertin (BHL 8753; late eleventh-century) and from several charters.  Said to have been oblated as a child to the monastery of Westminster, he succeeded St. Dunstan as abbot there and later as bishop of Sherborne.  At Sherborne he converted his chapter to Benedictine monasticism and secured for distribution to his secular clergy an epistle from Ælfric of Eynsham a detailed letter on pastoral care presenting the Benedictine Rule as as an ideal for the conduct of their lives.  A letter to W. and two from him occur in the Sherborne Pontifical (Paris, BnF, ms. Latin 943), a late tenth-century manuscript originally from Canterbury; W. may have obtained it for his diocese.  W. presided at St. Edward the Martyr's translation at Shaftesbury in 1001.

W. has yet to grace the pages of the RM.  He is commemorated today in the Order of St. Benedict.


6)  Lorenzo Giustiniani (d. 1456).  The theologian L., a member of one of Venice's leading families, had been one of the founding secular canons of San Giorgio in Alba and was their prior when in 1433 he was made bishop of Castello (as the diocese of Venice was then called).  He was prolific writer and an habitual ascetic.  In 1451, after the suppression of the patriarchate of Grado, L. became the first patriarch of Venice.  He was buried in his cathedral, San Pietro in Castello, where since 1649 his remains have reposed in the main altar (his cult as a _beato_ having been confirmed papally in 1524).  L.'s fellow Venetian Alexander VIII is said to have canonized him in 1690, shortly before his death; official publication of this act ensued only in 1727.

L. as depicted by Gentile Bellini in a painting from 1465 now in the Galleria dell'Accademia Veneziana:
http://www.giustiniani.info/slorenzo1.jpg
L. with other saints in a painting from ca. 1532 by Giovanni Antonio (Sacchis) da Pordenone, also in the Galleria dell'Accademia Veneziana:
http://www.giustiniani.info/slorenzo.jpg

Best,
John Dillon
(last year's post lightly revised and with the addition of Wulfsige)

**********************************************************************
To join the list, send the message: join medieval-religion YOUR NAME
to: [log in to unmask]
To send a message to the list, address it to:
[log in to unmask]
To leave the list, send the message: leave medieval-religion
to: [log in to unmask]
In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
[log in to unmask]
For further information, visit our web site:
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/medieval-religion.html

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager