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MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  November 2009

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION November 2009

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Subject:

CFP North American Patristics Society (Chicago, May 2010)

From:

George FERZOCO <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 11 Nov 2009 08:50:08 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (274 lines)

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Dear medieval-religion colleagues,

I am pleased to forward this on behalf of Prof. Ann Kuzdale  
([log in to unmask]).

(Prof. Kuzdale has organized the session, detailed below, on Gregory  
the Great, but as you will see there are several other sessions of  
interest to many of us.)

Best wishes, George

--
George FERZOCO
[log in to unmask]

*****************************
Begin forwarded message:

http://patristics.org/annual-meeting/call-for-papers/

Call for Papers for Open Call Sessions, Prearranged Sessions, and  
Individual Abstracts
Individual abstracts of approximately 300 words, including  
submissions to be considered for one of the Open Call Sessions  
(described below), and proposals for Prearranged Sessions can be  
submitted between 1 November and 15 December 2009. Please note that  
individual abstracts earmarked for but not accepted to an Open Call  
Session will automatically be entered into the general pool.  
Prearranged Sessions should be thematically consistent and will  
typically include three or four papers; an abstract for each paper  
should accompany the proposal submitted by the session’s organizer,  
except in cases of book panels, translation workshops, and the  
like.Notification of acceptance of all paper and session proposals  
will be made in January.

Abstracts should: 1) present a clear thesis; 2) indicate knowledge of  
the sources; 3) show awareness of relevant methodological,  
historiographical, or philosophical issues; and 4) treat subject  
matter that falls within the parameters of Late Ancient and Patristic  
studies.

Only NAPS members in good standing may read papers.

Questions or suggestions for improving the call process, which  
contains new components and deadlines, are welcome.

Dennis Trout ([log in to unmask]), Vice-President, NAPS, and Program  
Chair

Open Call Sessions
1. Gender and Nag Hammadi
Chairs: Katherine Veach and Nathan Bennett

This session welcomes discussion of the role of gender in the  
language, authorship, context, audience, narratives, interpretation  
and reception of the texts of the Nag Hammadi library. The desired  
outcome of such a discussion is a fuller appreciation of gender in  
the school of thought represented by Nag Hammadi, as well as an  
awareness of the role of gender in interpretations (both ancient and  
modern) of these texts.

2. The Reception and Interpretation of Sacred Texts in Early  
Christianity:The Transfiguration
Chairs: Jeffrey Bingham and Bogdan G. Bucur

A growing number of students and scholars work at the intersection of  
the Bible (broadly defined) and Patristics. The intention here is to  
harness this interest to explore the exegetical underpinning of the  
doctrinal, liturgical, ascetic, visionary, and artistic expressions  
of the various early Christian movements. For the purposes of this  
session “sacred texts” encompasses the variety of texts belonging to  
the Hebrew Bible and the Septuagint, the New Testament, and the so- 
called OT Pseudepigrapha, which were deemed sacred and authoritative  
during Christian antiquity.  Similarly, “early Christianity” embraces  
a broad spectrum of religious movements, irrespective of the various  
ancient or modern categories under which they are usually grouped.  
For this session, we invite submissions that explore the reception  
and interpretation of the synoptic Transfiguration account.

3. Religion and Society in Syrian Antioch
Chair: Wendy Mayer

The past decade has seen a resurgence of interest in the city of  
Antioch on the Orontes in the late antique period as witnessed by the  
Antioch exhibition organised by Christine Kondoleon in 2000; the  
conference held in Lyon in 2001; the publication since 2006 of books  
by Isabella Sandwell, Jacqui Maxwell, and Rafaella Cribiore; and the  
forthcoming volume on the city’s churches by Wendy Mayer and Pauline  
Allen. The day seminar on the city sponsored by the Center for the  
Study of Early Christianity at CUA in March 2009 and the meeting in  
Paris in January 2010 to launch the Lexicon Topographicum Antiochenum  
project are further evidence of this increasing momentum. In 2010,  
too, the results of the new archaeological survey by a joint Halle- 
Wittenburg-Mustafa Kemal University team will be published and fresh  
excavations in the city are scheduled to commence. The aims of this  
session are to promote further scholarly interest in the city and  
stimulate discussion and the exchange of ideas. Presenters are  
encouraged to submit abstracts for papers on all aspects of the  
connection between religion (not just Christianity) and society in  
the city for the period from 100-800 CE.

4. The Rhetoric of Heaven
Chairs: Candida R. Moss and Taylor Petrey

This session invites papers on the construction of heaven and  
heavenly bodies in ancient Christian literature. Papers may focus  
either on the architecture and topography of the heavens or on  
portrayal of heavenly occupants with a view to the way that these  
depictions function rhetorically in Christian discourse. Suggested  
topics include the role of gender, ethnicity, nationality, and  
disability in the construction of heavenly bodies; the reproduction  
and creation of heavenly hierarchies; the interpretation of  
scriptural traditions in the portrayal of heaven; the rhetorical  
function of appeals to heavenly authority; the relationship between  
the heavenly and the terrestrial; and the way that constructions of  
heaven function in martyrological, heresiological, and ecclesiastical  
discourse.

5. Ambrosiaster (or "De-mystifying the ’Mysterious Ambrosiaster’")
Chair: David G. Hunter

The anonymous biblical commentator usually called "the Ambrosiaster"  
has been one of the more enigmatic figures in Latin Patristic  
literature.  Recent studies by Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe, Marie-Pierre  
Bussières, and Emanuele Di Santo have shed new light on important  
aspects of his thought, but there is still much to be learned from  
his extensive opera.  This call for papers seeks contributions on all  
aspects of Ambrosiaster’s work, including his identity and  
provenance, the different recensions of his oeuvre, his relation to  
earlier and subsequent biblical commentators, and all aspects of his  
theology.

6. Syriac Homiletic Biblical Exegesis
Chairs: Robert A. Kitchen and Kristian S. Heal

Among the most creative and imaginative aspects of Syriac patristics  
is the Biblical exegesis found in the homiletic writings of a wide  
diversity of Syriac authors.Much research on Syriac Biblical  
exegesis, however, focuses upon a single author or work, seldom  
analysing broader patterns and hermeneutical approaches among a range  
of authors and traditions.This session aims to draw together studies  
of Biblical exegesis from different genres of sermons:extended  
exegeses of Biblical episodes and personalities in longer homiletic  
discourses; poetic homilies on Biblical themes; expository  
commentaries on particular Biblical books; and the numerous anonymous  
dramatic dialogue poems. Likely candidates for consideration include  
Aphrahat, Ephrem, the Book of Steps, Isaac of Antioch, Narsai, Jacob  
of Serug, Daniel of Salah, and Isaac of Nineveh.While the range of  
possibilities is broad, two primary themes are suggested: (1)  
typology of Biblical personalities or events and (2) exegesis/ 
interpretation of a Biblical passage in which the author relates at  
least one significant detail at variance from the canonical version  
for homiletic purposes.

7. Love, the Mind, and Books: exegetical pedagogy and noetic exegesis
Chairs: Blossom Stefaniw and Michael V. Niculescu

A large section of late antique religious life was cultivated in a  
complex interaction between individuals in the roles of teachers or  
students and texts credited with possessing a noetic or divine  
content.Origen’s complex exegetical pedagogy has been analysed by  
Karen Jo Torjesen and, most recently, Vlad Niculescu, for example.  
The spiritual aspect of interaction with such texts in Evagrius  
Ponticus, understood as contemplative reading, has been investigated  
by Luke Dysinger, a circle around Didymus the Blind has been studied  
by Richard Layton, and Blossom Stefaniw has most recently produced a  
study of noetic exegesis in Origen, Didymus, and Evagrius.These  
examples of exegetical pedagogy and noetic exegesis have in common  
the belief in a divine/noetic deposit in the books being studied and  
in the spiritual/noetic ability of the process of learning to  
perceive and engage with that deposit. We intend to focus on the  
transformative relationship between student, teacher and text in  
Origen, Evagrius and anyof their contemporaries from the earliest  
third to the latest fourth centuries, on the educative aim of  
cultivating the moral, mental, and spiritual capacities of the  
person, and on the textual strategies that make possible this goal’s  
attainment.

8. The Reception of Paul’s Letter to the Romans: Predestination and  
Divine Sovereignty
Chairs: George Kalantzis and Patout Burns

The commentators on Romans generally take an approach significantly  
different from Augustine’s reading of this text, which struggled with  
and then affirmed both a divine control of human willing and a  
limited intention to save.  Most writers assumed that God granted  
autonomous self-determination to humans; the divine will to save was  
therefore taken to be conditional upon human cooperation with the  
means provided by God.  Divine foreknowledge of a negative human  
response to an offer of the means of salvation was used to justify  
the denial or withholding of those means.  Even those, such as Origen  
and Gregory of Nyssa, who affirmed some form of universal salvation  
protected the autonomy of the human agent.The instances of divine  
election of one person or group over another that are affirmed in the  
Hebrew Bible were brought to bear in the Letter to the Romans. Paul  
reflected not only on the gratuity of the divine preference for Jacob  
and Esau in chapter 9 but also on the divine plan which used the  
temporary Jewish rejection of Christ as an instrument for the  
salvation of both Gentiles and Jews.That session invites papers that  
explore both the strategies used and conclusions in this regard  
reached by writers in the patristic period and the use of these  
interpretations for dealing with theological issues and pastoral  
practice.

9. The Reception of Gregory the Great in the Middle Ages
Chair: Ann Kuzdale

Next to Augustine and Jerome, Gregory the Great (590-604) was one of  
the most cited and influential authorities in the Middle Ages.  
Gregory’s ideas shaped not only a spirituality that emphasized the  
miraculous power of the living holy man, but also a mentalité that  
came to be identified as particularly medieval in its synthesis of  
the physical and spiritual worlds. In works such as his Moralia,  
Dialogues, andPastoral Care, Gregory wrote on the nature of the moral  
life, miracles, grace, eschatology, ecclesiology, monasticism, and  
the afterlife. Many of these works as well as his homilies on the  
Gospels and Ezekiel circulated during his lifetime and his reputation  
as an authority for preachers was well-established within one hundred  
years of his death. By the ninth century, some of his works were  
translated into Greek.The goal of this panel is to bring together  
scholars working on various aspects of the influence of Gregory’s  
thought upon later writers and thinkers, with special attention to  
the ways in which such figures adapted Gregory’ ideas to create new  
works meaningful in their own context.

10. Touching Religion in Late Antiquity
Chair: Douglas Boin

It’s become de rigeur to characterize the three great monotheistic  
religions (Judaisim, Christianity, and Islam) as “religions of the  
book,” holding, as they do, certain sacred writings in common. Our  
modern shorthand, however, rarely accounts for the fact that during  
most of antiquity—at least during those centuries when the first two  
of these religious groups flourished side-by-side-books, as we would  
call them, were a very rare thing indeed. Religion, then, at least  
for most people in the ancient Mediterranean world who were neither  
rabbis nor theologians, was for a long time intricately bound up with  
other things. This session is concerned with the physical traces  
which Greco-Roman, Jewish, Christian religious practices left behind  
in the ancient and late ancient world (c. 150 B.C.E.-600 C.E.).  
Seeking papers that address how tangible things (like altars,  
statues, and dining halls, not to mention sacred sites) helped people  
of antiquity construct diverse ideas about their religions, this  
session is particularly keen to explore how the wide array of  
historical artifacts — from amulets to mosaics, sculptures to  
architecture — often nuance or directly challenge Jewish or Christian  
theological assumptions developed, passed down, and codified in later  
textual sources.

11. The “Early Christianity and the Ancient Economy” Research Project
Chair: Charles A. Bobertz

This session invites papers for a session that is part of a larger  
international project on Early Christianity and the Ancient Economy  
(sessions are also held at the SBL and ISBL meetings). Papers may  
focus on any aspect of the relationship between Early Christianity  
and the Ancient Economy, demonstrating both similarities and  
differences in attitudes, approaches to problems, and attempted  
solutions.

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