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NEW-MEDIA-CURATING  September 2009

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING September 2009

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Subject:

Re: Fwd: [NEW-MEDIA-CURATING] September 2009: update and "Real-Time: Showing Art in the Age of New Media"

From:

Simon Biggs <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Simon Biggs <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 5 Sep 2009 10:51:40 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

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text/plain (125 lines)

Rogerıs reference to the publishing industry is timely. It is currently
facing its biggest challenge since ­ well, since it existed. As we all know,
the internet allows alternate models of distribution, authorship and
readership to emerge. As this happens some gain traction and become economic
models. Googleıs legal victory in the USA yesterday, allowing it to put
millions of in-copyright books online (at least in the USA), is the most
visible example of change in the publishing industry. I donıt know if this
is a good or bad thing, but it will not be the last shock to a faltering
model.

If museums, and the artworld they occupy, are going to change they will not
do so out of their own actions. If they change it will be because of some
form of irresistable alternate model emerging. We have seen, over the past
20 years of mainstream internet access, some interesting challenges to the
current corporate and commercialised artworld but none that gained traction,
nothing that effectively changed anything (although viable alternatives do
exist in small pockets). Taking the current case of the publishing industry
I imagine that when change does happen it will be at the fundamental level
of how and why art is made and engaged ­ a new social model of art that the
current economic model is unable to engage. The artworld will only change
when it recognises it has become an irrelevance.

I know that there are plenty of people running around saying that the model
for change has arrived. This has been happening since - forever. One day one
of them is going to be right. Thatıll be interesting.

Best

Simon


Simon Biggs
Research Professor
edinburgh college of art
[log in to unmask]
www.eca.ac.uk
www.eca.ac.uk/circle/

[log in to unmask]
www.littlepig.org.uk
AIM/Skype: simonbiggsuk



From: roger malina <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To: roger malina <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Sat, 5 Sep 2009 11:18:55 +0200
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: [NEW-MEDIA-CURATING] Fwd: [NEW-MEDIA-CURATING] September 2009:
update and "Real-Time: Showing Art in the Age of New Media"

Charlie, Johannes, Sally Jane, Josephine et al

some saturday morning inputs

= I agree that insitutional acceptance of new kinds of artmaking
can reflect underlying cultural questions= but unfortunately there are
purely structual (see network theory) realities that make institutions
in general resistant to change= and the larger the institution the
longer the time constants- coupled to just generational hand over
so maybe one shouldnt over interpret why a museum build around
concepts of connoisseurship and the art market will have trouble
getting interested in time based real time interactive work. The turmoil
in the print publishing industry faced with open networked "read and write"
texts doesnt need to go into Lacan to be understood in my opinion.

=time based arts have always existed and as simon mentions took a particular
institutional form in the 1970s- at the same time as inter-media etc

=the new situation of interest i do think has to do with real time, multiple
user
interactive distributed work= which is not scored in the way of performance
but establishes contexts within which evolutive works emerge= i am happy
to get into Lacan and others on this, issue of alienation/loneliness etc

- would tie the definition of 'real time' to "non-scored" which was
discussed in
an earlier crumb discussion

= would also separate single user/spectator work (eg head mounted
augmented reality systems) and multi user systems which present different
problems of display to external audiences= the issues obiviously already
arise in performance art, see for instance frank popper's book arts
interactifs
-there is a long discussion on this in french on the olats web site

http://www.olats.org/livresetudes/basiques/6_basiques.php

This discussion itself on crumb would be itself illustrate some of the
issues=
its a real time, but non synchronous, multi user discussion within the
particular
contraints of the technical protocols of an elist- there is a clear written
annotation
of the event.

Coming back to my parrallel example of publishing industry resistance to new
forms of publication  Marin Dacos book (!) on READ WRITE BOOK
http://www.unibook.com/unibook/site/bookdetail/?bookid=7624&lang=fr
develops many of the issues.

Roger



-

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Gere, Charlie <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Fri, Sep 4, 2009 at 7:45 AM
S

Hi Crumbs


It is obvious that the incursion of time-based art into the gallery or
museum space involves considerably more than simply the inclusion of other
forms of media. It offers rather a profound challenge to a number of
assumptions about the 'art work' as a phenomenon, to do with its supposed
autonomy, stability, endurability. So far so obvious. What is perhaps
interesting is to think about the context in which this took place and how
it reflects other questions.


Edinburgh College of Art (eca) is a charity registered in Scotland, number SC009201

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