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NEW-MEDIA-CURATING  September 2009

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING September 2009

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Subject:

Re: Recap: September 2009: "Real-Time: Showing Art in the Age of New Media"

From:

Verina Gfader <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Verina Gfader <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 8 Sep 2009 11:49:47 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (172 lines)

 dear list  - brief jump in with some lines: 

1. the notion of seamless and risk and how it continues to be a desired
factor in contemporary practices? 

2. there is an interesting issue of topology here, where the aspect of
'real time' is intrinsically bound or even replaced by topographical
aspects. Still reading this wonderful book by Branden W. Joseph 'Beyond
the Dream Syndicate, Tony Conrad and the Arts after Cage' which includes
writing on minor histories, flicker film/sound, the experimental and
electronic streams, Joseph addresses the shift from work/audience to the
topographical situation... On the reconfiguration of the traditional
subject-object/listener/work relation by the topographical situation of
a listener within a multidimensional transformational field (i.e. a
field of more than two dimensions) he notes: "Cage's compositions
emulated a type of acoustical 'transparency' to external events that
undermined their separation and autonomy. To this end, many of Cage's
compositions could be performed simultaneously, allowing for a kind of
superimposition or audio collage effect through which they melded into
one another and further blurred their status as discrete works. With
neither determinable formal nor 'spatial' limitations, Cage's
compositions were to be grasped not as discrete, acoustical
'time-objects,' but s temporally changing, yet ateleological
('purposeless') 'processes'. [...] According to Cage, seeing the
composition as an ateleological process or focusless, but differentiated
field produces an additional transformation in the listening
relationship, which is the third relevant point of his aesthetic:
Interpretation gives way to 'experimentation'. 

Questions of vocabularies? How do we frame the 'experimental'? through
time? time-structures? 
In what sense is such statement or approach still relevant? 
And, how to provide the space for such work, can it be any space? 
How relevant are these questions now? 

Is the "real-time" issue just always movement itself?
By "making [ ] unthinkable objects—artefacts that can only be sensed—
pure sensation arises" (Brian Massumi, 2002). This is also the "direct
registering of potential" and in this sense creates an event-space, a
space for a “coming into being” and for a “taking place”.  


verina

> ----- Forwarded message from [log in to unmask] -----
>     Date: Tue, 8 Sep 2009 12:22:35 +0300
>     From: helen varley jamieson <[log in to unmask]>
> Reply-To: helen varley jamieson <[log in to unmask]>
>  Subject: Re: [NEW-MEDIA-CURATING] Recap: September 2009: "Real-
> Time:  
> Showing Art in the Age of New Media"
>       To: [log in to unmask]
> 
> lag/delay in live internet performance can introduce 'difficulties' 
> butit's a feature of the landscape - even on the best connections 
> it can
> occur, at random; & we have found that it is also an important 
> verifierof the liveness of an event. i think the only time i've 
> experienced a
> totally lag-free cyberformance was when avatar body collision 
> performedat the virtual minds congress (bremen, 2004) & afterwards 
> people were
> questioning whether the live web cams were in fact live, or 
> prerecordedvideo. when we assured them that it was all live, people 
> then asked why
> did we risk doing it live, when it looked like it had been pre-
> recorded.
> random lag can be really frustrating but it also heightens suspense,
> tension & liveness; & the 'normal' delay of the internet can be played
> with, for instance in layering of images, or creating a different 
> senseof rhythm & timing.
> 
> h : )
> 
> Josephine Bosma wrote:
> > dear Sarah and other Crumbs,
> >
> >
> > Just some thoughts...
> >
> > Since the discussion is going in many different directions I 
> decided  
> > to look back at your initial call and theme, which is in the 
> subject  
> > line of this mail. Am I mistaking when I think this topic is 
> first  
> > and foremost not so much about time, but about presence, access 
> and  
> > connectivity? I have always found this aspect the most intriguing 
> 
> > issue in art using any kind of electronic media, because of the  
> > sensitivity and vulnerability involved. In this area one time 
> aspect  
> > appears that was not mentioned here yet, and this is delay. Delay 
> is  
> > of special importance in decentralized performance. I remember 
> how  
> > VRML and sound performance Adrift by Helen Thorington and 
> Fakeshop  
> > between Vienna and New York in 1997 was difficult because of it. 
> I  
> > am not sure how and if it is of influence in 'decentralized'  
> > installations, like for instance in Atau Tanaka's Global String.
> >
> > Delay only really matters in case of actual real-time 
> experiences;  
> > there are also real-time simulations. The beauty of all media 
> (print  
> > included) is of course the possibility of some sort of presence  
> > despite of distance. In the 19th century the museum's reach for  
> > example was expanded through the publication of photographs and  
> > collector's albums and magazines. A very interesting text about  
> > photography/reproduction and the artworld is the PhD of Friedrich 
> 
> > Tietjen, which was not published as a book yet as far as I know.  
> > Radio, TV and Internet create a much stronger sense of real-time  
> > presence though, which can feel very real even when faked. I 
> think  
> > of for instance Debra Solomon's project 'The_Living' in which she 
> 
> > combined chat-performances with fake webcam input of her and her  
> > keyboard under water, on a bicycle, or on a boat in an Amsterdam  
> > canal. It took a while before her audience realized one could  
> > connect a video camera/player to the webcam input quite easily. 
> This  
> > theatrical side of electronic media (think also of War of the 
> Worlds  
> > or in some ways the Truman Show) is well known and discussed, 
> like  
> > in Zizek's text about the Matrix. It undermines a sense of 
> reality,  
> > and thus of engagement. I like very much how questions of 
> presence,  
> > the tension between local and distant interaction, and the  
> > importance of intimacy/closeness for an experience of reality can 
> be  
> > investigated and displayed through the theme of Real-Time. I hope 
> 
> > some of you can share some nice examples of exhibitions or 
> artworks  
> > that explore these topics. Technical issues are most welcome to 
> hear  
> > about too... ;-)
> >
> >
> > Back to work,
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > J
> > *
> >
> 
> 
> -- 
> ____________________________________________________________
> 
> helen varley jamieson: creative catalyst
> [log in to unmask]
> http://www.creative-catalyst.com
> http://www.avatarbodycollision.org
> http://www.upstage.org.nz
> http://www.writerfind.com/hjamieson.htm
> ____________________________________________________________
> 
> 
> ----- End forwarded message -----
> 
> 
> 

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