JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives


NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Archives


NEW-MEDIA-CURATING@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Home

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING Home

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING  September 2009

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING September 2009

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: Recap: September 2009: "Real-Time: Showing Art in the Age of New Media"

From:

Sally Jane Norman <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Sally Jane Norman <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 8 Sep 2009 08:52:16 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (114 lines)

Ah, thanks Curt; I think this - put much more eloquently - aligns with something I was trying to get at with my earlier question:

And (how far) can these (different) aspects/ dimensions of time be separated in art? Or is its role precisely to inseparably entangle them?

best
sjn


________________________________________
From: Curating digital art - www.crumbweb.org [[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Curt Cloninger [[log in to unmask]]
Sent: 07 September 2009 22:14
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [NEW-MEDIA-CURATING] Recap: September 2009: "Real-Time: Showing Art in the Age of New Media"

Hi Sarah (and all),

One thing that stands out to me  after having read this recap of the
conversation is this idea of multiple speeds and slownesses happening
simultaneously at multiple levels. This is a very Deleuzean
observation that planes of meanng are not just a matter of molar
objects and subjects in spatial and power relations to each other.
Rather, meaning and ways of being are more a matter of speeds of
movement, attrition, attention, permeation, deterritorialization, etc.

+++++++++++++++++

Some scales of speed simultaneously at play in The Art Formerly Known
as Time-Based:

1. The time it takes the actual media art object to play out (as Jon
Thompson noted -- a decaying sculpture, a perpetually updated data
cloud). Smithson's work really problematizes this kind of time.  The
art collective Spurse has been exploring "deep time/rapid time,"
considering geological formations over time. Also categorically
problematic is aleatoric software (like Brian Eno's "77 Million
Paintings") which perpetually runs with enough generative variability
to keep from ever "looking" like the same thing twice (although
arguably it is performing the same perpetual function at an
algorithmic level).

2. The Cartesian clock time that the discrete viewer/user actually
spends viewing/interacting with the work in the space (three seconds,
30 minutes, or whatever).

3. The more subjective Bergsonian time (analog, non-digital,
qualitative not quantitative) that the discrete viewer spends
affectively experiencing the work (could involve personal prior
memories, could involve the work coming to mind later after leaving
the space). This is related to the Cartesian clock time, but by no
means solely determined by it.

4. The time that the entire show or project runs.

5. Archival time -- how the work is archived, collected, subsequently
displayed, gradually folded into an art historical canon.

6. The evolutionary time of art criticism and art historical
scholarship (and its overlap with philosophy, science, culture
theory, etc.)

7. The evolutionary time of an art practice throughout an artist's life.

8. Curatorial research time.

9. Institutional evolutionary time -- the time it takes art
institutions to come to terms with and incorporate new media forms
(or new conceptual approaches to old media forms).

+++++++++++++++++

And of course, historical and political rates of speed contextually
permeate and inflect all of the above rates of speed. And of course
all of the above rates of speed perpetually permeate and inflect each
other. These permeations and inflections are "always already"
happening (to greater or lesser degrees). The artist and curator can
(and should) attempt to more purposefully orchestrate these temporal
permeations. But they are happening already (however haphazardly,
slip-shoddily, accidentally, ironically), regardless of the artist or
curator's awarenesses or stated intentions.

I propose that truly ingenious "event-based" work (in whatever media)
is work that invites all of these scales of speed into the work
itself, so that the work proves self-aware of its own context -- not
hermetically sealed from these other speeds and slownesses, these
other rates of advance and attrition. Such ingenious work is not
merely multi-media, or even multi-scalar (in a spatial sense) -- it
is multi-dromological (to invoke Virillio). It is work that works
across multiple scales of speed. It is not merely reducible to a form
of "institutional critique" or a form of "activist art." It
transverses institutional and political power relations, but it also
functions phenomenologically and affectively as an art work in the
space itself. Smithson's "Partially Buried Woodshed," Matta-Clark's
house cuttings, Duchamp's long-term work on the Green Box, even Bill
Viola's slow motion Tristan Project -- all succeed at working across
and purposefully invoking multiple scales of time. And none are
technically "new media." Some of John Cage's compositions are
especially ingenious in this regard. "Water Walk" still invites in
the sounds of "real-time, contemporary" radio. Cell phone ring tones
can now be heard during 4'33''.

Best,
Curt




At 6:50 PM +0100 9/7/09, Sarah Cook wrote:
>Hi CRUMB list readers
>
>It's Monday (and Labour Day in North America, so a holiday but the
>official marking of the back-to-school season), and for the purposes
>of those just joining up to this discussion, here is my rough and
>ready re-cap of some of the points so far...

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager