JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for BRITARCH Archives


BRITARCH Archives

BRITARCH Archives


BRITARCH@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

BRITARCH Home

BRITARCH Home

BRITARCH  July 2009

BRITARCH July 2009

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: plant temper

From:

Andy Holland <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

British archaeology discussion list <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 21 Jul 2009 12:08:39 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (97 lines)

On a sort of related note....

You can now buy "air drying Clay" from education suppliers like YPO and
this has a very fine fibre within it (and I assume acting like a temper)
to stop it cracking etc as it dries and hardens in air. I guess this is
likely to be a plant fibre so it might be worth finding out what as I
guess similar plant fibres would have worked just as well in the past.
The fibre is very fine and makes me wonder if animal hair was ever used
as temper in the past? Anyone know for sure?

Andy

Andy HollandBSc. MSc PGCE AIFA
Education Project Officer (11-18)
Council for British Archaeology,
York
Tel: 01904 671417
www.Britarch.ac.uk

Raise money for Council for British Archaeology as you search the web
With Everyclick you can fundraise for Council for British Archaeology
every day.
HELP Council for British Archaeology TODAY - make
http://www.everyclick.com/council-for-british-archaeology your homepage.


> -----Original Message-----
> From: British archaeology discussion list
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
> Behalf Of Beatrice Hopkinson
> Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2009 9:20 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: plant temper
> 
> Merryn,
> 
>     Thank you for reminding me of the seashells at coastal sites:)  I
was
> also interested that pure clay was found on the Orkneys only two feet
> down - was it in a low-lying riverine area?  At Droitwich we too found
a
> very pure smooth grey clay with no inclusions at Roman levels which
was 3
> meters deep when a sewer pipe was being laid - and I used some of it
to
> make some reproduction pots.  It can also be noted that clay is more
> accessible in the borders of river banks  which contains natural
> inclusions that might include chaff and stones and sand that was used
for
> making some prehistoric pots.
> 
> Bea
> 
> [log in to unmask]
> 
> >I would agree with this, Bea. We tried making pots under the
supervision
> >of an expert potter (Andrew Appleby of Orkney). Clay was dug and we
had
> >to remove stones from it rather than add anything to it. Depends
where
> >you get the clay from, a variety of 'inclusions' from stones to
> >seashells can be found in different locations on Orkney. I was
recently
> >given some clay from about two feet down (friendly farmer digging a
> >ditch) and it was devoid of any inclusions. My point is that clay is
> >variable. Sometimes it might need tempering, sometimes not.
> >
> >As Bea says below, I doubt that valuable plants were used to such
> >purpose. I have read many pot reports over the years and inorganic
> >tempering seems to be the most common.
> >
> >Merryn
> >
> >Beatrice Hopkinson wrote:
> >> I've never heard that a specific type of plant was used for
tempering,
> >> nor even seeds for that matter (probably too precious?), other than
chaff
> >> left over from winnowing or in the fields I've found mostly
inorganic
> >> temperings like sand, limestone, pebbles, grog (potsherds),
essentially
> >> whatever was available.  The size of the tempering would also have
been
> >> an issue as well as the labor where that was necessary.
> >>
> >> Bea
> >>
> >> [log in to unmask]
> >>
> >>> Can anyone please point me in the direction of what types of
plants were
> >>> used for tempering prehistoric pots in Britain.
> >>> Something a little more definitive than cut grass/straw.
> >>> many thanks
> >>> Rob Ixer

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JISCMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998


WWW.JISCMAIL.AC.UK

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager