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PHD-DESIGN  February 2009

PHD-DESIGN February 2009

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Subject:

SV: Creativity and Nature vs Nuture

From:

Lars Albinsson <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Lars Albinsson <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 17 Feb 2009 07:38:30 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (231 lines)

Dear Rob and Terry (and all),

Part of my PhD is looking at roles in IT/IS innovation. In such cases (and
most likely other cases) it is hard to separate creativity from the ability
to turn ideas into reality. People who only express ideas are not
necessarily recognized as being creative. Often the quality of ideas is also
related to their successful implementation. Therefore the creative person in
this field is often connected with some entrepreneurial capacity.

In a meta-analysis of physiological factors of entrepreneurship Rausch and
Frese concludes that entrepreneurs who are more innovative are often from
well educated, middle class families. I find their explanation to be that
the upbringing did not change their intelligence, but rather supplies them
with a self-image and self-confidence that is necessary for pursuing their
ideas.

Perhaps the self-confidence etc that may be the result of social factor
affects the way people utilize or allow their traits to flower?



/Lars

Rauch, A. & Frese, M. 2000. Psychological approaches to entrepreneurial
success. A general model and an overview of findings. In C. L. Cooper & I.
T. Robertson (Eds.), International review of industrial and organizational
psychology. Vol. 15: 101-142. Chichester: Wiley.





**************************************
Lars Albinsson
[log in to unmask]
+ 46 (0) 70 592 70 45

Affiliations:
Maestro Management AB www.maestro.se 
Calistoga Springs Research Institute www.calistoga.se 
School of Business and Informatics
University of Borås www.hb.se
Linköping University www.liu.se
**************************************


-----Ursprungligt meddelande-----
Från: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related
research in Design [mailto:[log in to unmask]] För Terence Love
Skickat: den 17 februari 2009 04:22
Till: [log in to unmask]
Ämne: Re: Creativity and Nature vs Nuture

Dear Rob,

Thank you for the heads up on Lars Plenke's thesis. 

Lars' report of his research needs some care in its interpretation. It
points in many directions.

For example, he also claims that  heritability of creativity is no different
than for other personality traits (p77).

And 'the following picture emerged: Individual differences in T-88 scores
and the resulting creativity factor 1 appeared only determined by
environmental effects, while all indicators based on molar creativity
ratings, their resulting factor, and the common core they share with the
T-88 dimensions (the creativity general factor) were weakly to moderately
heritable...' (p68)

Lars suggests (and as he notes 'arguably') his general factor might be
interpretable as a core disposition towards creativity. It is only this
'general factor' that appears to show heritability of 61% and  this appears
somewhat at odds with the interpretations for  his factor 1 and factor 2.

More importantly, perhaps, he is suggesting his data shows that this genetic
effect is emergenic rather than running in families. This implies that
creative individuals are partially such because of their physiological
makeup but this is not particularly an issue of family trait inheritance.

Where does this leave the question  of how to support the use of creative
people in businesses? To me it seems to add no information useful 'in the
moment' in the sense that it supports the idea that if you need creative
people then hire people that have demonstrated that they are creative and
support them appropriate to their skills and tasks. This is common practice
in what one would do with specialists in others tasks such as managers,
accountants, cleaners, and academics.

Two weaknesses of the study seem to be 1) its central dependence on a
consensual agreement about 'what is creativity'. Lars focus has been on
validating an approach based on generic agreement of meaning and subjective
judgement. This agreement may be consensually wrong, irrelevant or unhelpful
in the way that opinions about say nationalism or racism might be broadly
shared.  2) Lars approach  does not test the analyses against  existing
knowledge about causal neuro-cognitive understanding about how we as humans
'do' creativity internally. 

Cheers,
Terry
____________________
Dr. Terence Love, FRDS, AMIMechE, PMACM
Founder member Design-focused Research Group, Design Out Crime Research
Group
Researcher, Digital Ecosystems and Business Intelligence Institute
Associate,  Planning and Transport Research Centre
Curtin University, PO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845
Mob: 0434 975 848, Fax +61(0)8 9305 7629, [log in to unmask] 
Visiting Professor, Member of Scientific Council 
UNIDCOM/ IADE, Lisbon, Portugal
Honorary Fellow, Institute of Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Development
Management School, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
____________________




-----Original Message-----
From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related
research in Design [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Rob
Curedale
Sent: Tuesday, 17 February 2009 11:07 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Creativity and Nature vs Nuture

Thank you Gunar and others for your replies.

In this study by Lars Penke in 2003 from the Department of Psychology of the
Faculty for Psychology at the University of Bielefeld

http://www.larspenke.eu/pdfs/Penke_2003_-_Creativity.pdf

The author concludes on page 81 that:

"What makes a person creative? ...., the superficial answer for everyday
creativity in normal people that has emerged is: To over 60% his or her
genes and to less than 40% his or her non-shared environment."

The author also concludes that there is no correlation between personality
and creativity except the two traits of openness and extroversion.

Some problems have been created in Industrial design by the superficial
concentration of design media on 20 or so international design heroes whilst
almost ignoring the realities of the 200,000 or so non-famous designers.

My greater interest rather than being in creative genius is the balance
between a corporation selecting designers with an established high level of
creative output and/or providing an environment for people of average output
which stimulates creativity. Should the selection, environment and
management of people with established high creativity be the same as the
environment for people of average creative output. Companies like Apple and
seem to follow the direction of carefully selecting people with established
high level of creative output. Has anyone seen a study of techniques for
selecting and managing designers who have a relatively high level of
creative skill such as those at Apple or other companies that combine
business success with a recognized high level of quality of creative output?
What is different about Apple's design management approach?

Rob

On Mon, Feb 16, 2009 at 4:37 PM, Swanson, Gunnar <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Rob,
>
> I second Carma's suggestion that Gladwell's -Outliers- has some good 
> insights.
>
> > Would you conclude that social class, race, sex, educational level 
> > have
> more
> > to do with general intelligence than genetic inheritance?
>
> He makes a good case that
> 1) general intelligence is less important than many people think; 
> while being smart enough is important, being much smarter than smart 
> enough doesn't pay out in the form of real world accomplishment
> 2) social class has a lot to do with the capability to move up in the 
> world (not in the sense of external barriers to movement but in the 
> sense of the development of the world view that allows personal 
> achievement)
> 3) luck--in the sense of being born at the right time in the right 
> social and physical situation--has a bigger role in "genius" than we
realize.
>
> He does seem to imply that some sorts of "creativity" (I agree with 
> people who caution against using the term broadly as a singular trait) 
> are as innate as intelligence (in the "IQ" sense.)
>
> On Mon, Feb 16, 2009 at 2:13 PM, Carma R. Gorman <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> [snip]
> >> Despite the many fascinating genetic explanations/revelations that 
> >> have been in the news in the last five years, I still find 
> >> explanatory models like the one in Malcolm Gladwell's book 
> >> *Outliers* to be a lot more
> >> persuasive: I suspect that social class, race, sex, educational 
> >> level,
> etc.
> >> (and the opportunities these characteristics offer or preclude) 
> >> have a
> lot
> >> more to do with individual and familial creativity than genetic
> inheritance.
>
> I hope Topanga isn't washing down around you.
>
> Gunnar
> ----------
> Gunnar Swanson Design Office
> 1901 East 6th Street
> Greenville, North Carolina 27858
>
> [log in to unmask]
> +1 252 258 7006
>
> at East Carolina University:
> +1 252 328 2839
> [log in to unmask]
>



--
Rob Curedale | President | Curedale Inc | 22148 Monte Vista Drive Topanga
Canyon CA 90290 USA | tel: +1 310.455.2636 studio |  cell: +1 616.455.7025 |
www.curedale.com | [log in to unmask] |



-- 
Rob Curedale | President | Curedale Inc | 22148 Monte Vista Drive Topanga
Canyon CA 90290 USA | tel: +1 310.455.2636 studio |  cell: +1 616.455.7025 |
www.curedale.com | [log in to unmask] |

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