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NEW-MEDIA-CURATING  February 2009

NEW-MEDIA-CURATING February 2009

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Subject:

February 09 Theme: Lab/Time-based residencies and Environmental Response

From:

Sarah Cook <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Sarah Cook <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sun, 1 Feb 2009 18:33:26 +1300

Content-Type:

text/plain

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Parts/Attachments

text/plain (240 lines)

Lab/Time-based residencies and Environmental Response

This month CRUMB celebrates it being summertime in the Southern  
Hemisphere with the help of the artists, curators and theorists  
taking part in SCANZ 2009.

Solar Circuit Aotearoa New Zealand (SCANZ) is a two week residency  
organised by Intercreate.org for artists, producers, writers,  
theorists and curators set in New Plymouth New Zealand (January 26th  
to February 8th 2009). One of the residency themes is Environmental  
Response. Occurring alongside the residency are a two day symposium  
(February 7 and 8), performance evening & exhibition (opens February  
7), and curatorial workshop, all held at the Govett-Brewster Art  
Gallery. The Puke Ariki Museum and Library are also partners in the  
production of new projects for Pukekura Park as part of their 60  
Springs Project with local school groups. There is a lot going on!

This month we thought we would start with the underlying idea of the  
SCANZ residency, that of "Raranga Tangata" - the weaving together of  
people. Raranga Tangata is a Polynesian expression proposed by  
Charlie Tawhiao and adopted by Sally Jane Norman and Sylvia Nagl to  
describe the Internet. Contained within the expression is the  
fundamental question of what are the necessary conditions for weaving  
people together (technological or otherwise), and in particular in  
this context - a time-limited residency in a specific environmental  
and geographic place.

In the past the CRUMB list has discussed issues of lab-based models  
of production and exhibition (how do you turn a lab into a show?),  
and the question of time-based collaboration and residencies (how  
long does it take to make it work?). See for instance the discussions  
on Art and Science Collaborations (August 2002) and Open Source,  
Residencies and Labs (June 2008). Further comments on these topics  
from practical experience are always welcome.

However this month we'd like to discuss the conditions necessary for  
a successful weaving together of artists and curators, set within a  
specific locality. CRUMB has not, as yet, specifically discussed how  
new media artists respond to place and local environmental concerns  
when invited to participate in a residency (something which is often  
presumed or hoped for within international exchanges but not always  
made explicit as SCANZ is trying to do here). The CRUMB list did talk  
about Locative Media Art in April and May 2004, but that's not  
exactly what I mean here. Site-specific production of new media art,  
for instance as Brett Stallbaum is doing with his mobile storytelling  
project for Pukekura Park here, has particular challenges for both  
curators and artists. How do you manage the successful delivery of  
projects if the artist can only be onsite 8 days before the project  
launch or has to leave the day after, or you only get access to the  
presenting venue two days before the opening? How do you bring people  
up to speed, both those local and those coming in from afar?

You are invited to chime in with your thoughts on how to respond to  
place when you are in a new place, with new people, seeking to work  
together in a limited time-period, mindful of existing relationships  
and histories and geographical constraints to create something  
meaningful and lasting. No small order then! We'll start with a  
manageable chunk, with each of the participants here describing their  
projects in relation to the topic.

This month's respondents (no doubt there will be more) include (and  
bios follow)

Ian Clothier
Nina Czegledy
Trudy Lane
Local Time
Caro McCaw
Sally Jane Norman
Andrew Gryf Paterson
The Polytechnic
Melinda Rackham
Jacques Sirot
Brett Stallbaum
Mercedes Vicente
Addie Wagenknecht

With thanks for your input,
Sarah


References:

http://www.intercreate.org
http://www.govettbrewster.com
http://www.taranakiwiki.com/tiki/tiki-index.php?page=Puke%20Ariki
http://www.pukeariki.com/en/stories/entertainmentAndLeisure/ 
parktimeline.htm

Bios:

Ian M Clothier is a Senior Academic at Western Institute of  
Technology at Taranaki (WITT), Director of Intercreate Research  
Centre (intercreate.org) and founding Director of SCANZ (Solar  
Circuit Aotearoa New Zealand). He has been selected three times for  
ISEA (Inter-Society for the Electronic Arts) and exhibited projects  
with organisations based in nine countries. Thematically his projects  
involve notions around cultural hybridity and nonlinearity, more  
recently integrated systems. His written work has been published in  
Leonardo, Convergence and Digital Creativity and he has given many  
conference presentations.

Nina Czegledy, media artist, curator and writer works internationally  
on collaborative art & science & technology projects. She has  
produced time based and digital works, won awards for her artwork,  
exhibited widely, lead and participated in workshops, forums and  
festivals and published worldwide. She is president of Critical Media  
a Canadian based Knowledge initiative, is a Senior Fellow, KMDI,  
University of Toronto, Associate Adjunct Professor Concordia  
University, Montreal, Honorary Fellow, Moholy Nagy University of  
Design, Budapest, co-chair of the Leonardo Education Forum (LEF) and  
ex-officio chair of ISEA.

Trudy Lane is currently a masters research student, studying ways to  
develop a contextualisation of art online in a socially and  
politically conscious way. She works with Ian Clothier as part of  
Intercreate.org. She is also the much loved graphic designer of  
CRUMB's identity.

Local Time is a NZ art collective consisting of Danny Butt, Jon  
Bywater, Natalie Robertson and Alex Monteith. Danny Butt is an  
educator, writer and consultant on culture and technology, based in  
Aotearoa New Zealand.  Jon Bywater is Programme Leader for Critical  
Studies and Programme Leader for Studio One at the Elam School of  
Fine Arts, The University of Auckland. He is also active as a  
curator, and as a writer on art, music, and theory.

Caro McCaw is a Senior Lecturer and Academic Leader in Communication  
Design at Otago Polytechnic. Her research interests include examining  
situated creative practices, participatory art and design, and  
particularly the relationship between material location and networked  
culture drawing from examples in the fields of both art and design.  
Caroline is studying extramurally towards a PhD in Brisbane, Australia.

Sally Jane Norman Born in Napier, Aotearoa, Sally Jane’s background  
and interests are in live performance, art & technology, and  
interdisciplinary research. She followed a Master of Arts from  
Canterbury with a Doctorat de 3ème cycle (PhD) and Doctorat d’état at  
the Institut d’Etudes théâtrales, Université de Paris III, funding  
her research as a scientific translator. Commissioned papers include  
publications for the Centre national de la recherche scientifique,  
UNESCO and the French Ministry of Culture; she has led art and  
technology events including the New Images Conference at the Louvre  
(992) and performance research at the International Institute of  
Puppetry in Charleville-Mézières, Studio for Electro-Instrumental  
Music in Amsterdam (as artistic co-director), Zentrum für Kunst und  
Medientechnologie (ZKM) in Karlsruhe, and IRCAM in Paris. Sally Jane  
worked on EU Framework projects at the ZKM before becoming Director  
General of the Ecole supérieure de l’image in France (Angoulême/  
Poitiers), where she launched a pioneering practice-based Digital  
Arts doctorate with Poitiers University.  Since 2004, as founding  
director of Newcastle University’s Culture Lab, a digital laboratory  
working with Newcastle’s three faculties (Humanities, Science,  
Medicine), her role is to seed and host a wide range of  
interdisciplinary research projects. Sally Jane ensures consultancy  
for numerous international research and policy bodies; as a stubborn  
believer in the power of collaborative, interdisciplinary energies to  
spearhead innovative cultural and technological processes, she tends  
to work naturally in unclassifiable discomfort zones. http:// 
www.ncl.ac.uk/culturelab/people/profile/s.j.norman

Andrew Gryf Paterson is a Scottish artist-organiser, cultural  
producer and doctoral candidate, based in Helsinki, Finland. His work  
involves variable roles of initiator, participant, author and  
curator, according to different collaborative and cross-disciplinary  
processes. Andrew works across the fields of media/ network/  
environmental activism, pursuing a participatory arts practice  
through workshops, performative events, and storytelling.

The Polytechnic is an Arts organization based in the North east of  
England which has an emphasis on hand-on and distributed approaches  
to working with technology. Dominic Smith is an artist, programmer,  
musician and currently studying towards his PhD with CRUMB at  
Sunderland University. Sneha Solanki communicates her practice  
through art which interrogates science and technology. Solanki often  
works in process-based environments; producing events and projects  
which utilise low-tech, open and collaborative methods. Her practice  
extends to sound, web, broadcast, and time-based temporal works. Will  
Scrimshaw works with and writes about sound, performance and  
interaction. His work often makes use of interactive technologies and  
is focused around theories of resonance, noise, feedback, embodiment  
and materialism. He is currently pursuing PhD research into theories  
of sonorous individuation in relation to the work of Gilles Deleuze.

Melinda Rackham writes regularly  on the intertwining cultural issues  
and aesthetic, technological and conceptual shifts in networked,  
distributed, multi-user, game and mobile environments. She worked for  
over a decade with emergent practices and innovative technologies as  
a pioneering net artist, writer, curator, media consultant and  
cultural producer. She was the first Curator of Networked Media at  
the Australian Centre for Moving Image, and in 2002 she established  
the -empyre- online critical theory forum. Currently she is the  
Director of the Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT) -  
Australia's leading cultural organisation working at the intersection  
of art, research, science and emerging technologies to generate new  
creativities.

Jacques Sirot is an independent French film-maker whose creations  
over the past thirty years range from art works including graphic,  
photographic and multimedia installation pieces as founding member of  
CAIRN artists’ cooperative in Paris, to films on live performance and  
creative technologies events, and documentaries commissioned by local  
bodies and industrial organisations. Jacques has taught video and  
multimedia in a variety of professional development and art school  
contexts. His New Zealand productions include Tane’s Revenge, a film  
on forest destruction by opossums which premiered on NZTV in 1992  
with an ecological “possum rap” music video (co-production with The  
Pauas), and a documentary on Tapu Te Ranga Marae and its founder,  
Bruce Stewart (Island Bay, Wellington). Recent Aotearoa inspired work  
includes audiovisual meditations on Raranga tangata, screened as part  
of Sally Jane Norman and Sylvia Nagl’s joint conference presentations  
at Duke University, US (2007) and the Center for Literary and  
Cultural Research, Berlin (2008). Video works can be viewed at http:// 
www.dailymotion.com/user/keoracobus and http://idisk.mac.com/ 
mirlitant-Public. Jacques’ blog as an alien discoverer of  Newcastle  
upon Tyne is at http://vendredi.blog.lemonde.fr/

Brett Stalbaum is a full time faculty member in the Department of  
Visual Arts at the University of California, San Diego, where he  
coordinates the Interdisciplinary Computing in the Arts Major. He is  
a founding member of Electronic Disturbance Theater, C5 and  
paintersflat.net. Current research involves generative locative  
algorithms, the development of mobile software platforms for walking,  
and their applications in art, activism and education. He lives with  
his partner Paula Poole in an unincorporated area of Eastern San  
Diego County, USA.

Mercedes Vicente is Curator of Contemporary Art at the Govett  
Brewster Gallery in New Plymouth. Prior to moving to NZ, Mercedes was  
an independent curator and art critic living in New York City where  
she held curatorial positions in several art institutions including  
the Whitney Museum of American Art. Vicente earned masters’ degrees  
in Film and the Arts at New York University and in Curatorial Studies  
at Bard College and was Helena Rubinstein Curatorial Fellow at the  
Whitney Independent Study Program.

Addie Wagenknecht is an artist and former fellow at Eyebeam. Her  
'Shadow Project' which is a kinetic responsive system for creating  
environmentally aware architectural spaces, is a collaboration with  
Stefan Hechenberger under the name Nor_/d.

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