JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  February 2009

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION February 2009

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: saints of the day 17. February

From:

Peter McDonald <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 17 Feb 2009 17:41:59 +1100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (252 lines)

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

'a former estate or village raised to urban and to episcopal status
precisely because of the cult'

Amasea survives to this day as a titular see in the Roman church.  I met the
late Archbishop James Carroll, Titular Archbishop of Amasea 1965-95 and
auxiliary in the archdiocese of Sydney - a long way from north central
Turkey! 

-----Original Message-----
From: medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious
culture [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of John Dillon
Sent: Tuesday, 17 February 2009 4:17 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [M-R] saints of the day 17. February

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Today (17. February) is the feast day of:

1)  Theodore of Amasea (d. 306, supposedly).  The megalomartyr T., today's
best known saint of the Regno, is a martyr of today's Amasya in north
central Turkey, formerly Amaseia in Pontus (often latinized as 'Amasea'),
where by the 380s he had an active cult at a martyrion described by St.
Gregory of Nyssa in his panegyric on T. (BHG 386).  An English-language
translation of this text is here:
http://www.sage.edu/faculty/salomd/nyssa/theodore.html
The location of the early martyrion is disputed.  Since at least the time of
the emperor Anastasius (491-518) it was in the outlying community of
Euchaita (today's Avkat), a former estate or village raised to urban and to
episcopal status precisely because of the cult.  "Eastern" churches have
traditionally considered today to be T.'s _dies natalis_.  From Bede through
the Roman Martyrology of 1956, "western" martyrologies listed him on 9.
November.  Said to have been a soldier slain while still a young man, T. was
from at least the later fifth century onward widely known as a great
military saint.

Shortly after the ninth century T.'s legend bifurcated: in both "east" and
"west" he was treated both as Theodore the General (T. Stratelates or
Stratilates) and as Theodore the Recruit (T. Tiro), as the young Theodore's
appellation was now interpreted.  In the Byzantine world, at least, the two
Theodores were venerated by different classes: the general by officers and
the recruit by other ranks.  T. the General (a.k.a. T. of Heraclea) came to
have a different _dies natalis_, 7. February (in Byzantine synaxaries, 8.
February), and was listed as a saint of that day in the RM though its
version of 1956.  The new (2001) version of the RM returned the Roman Rite
to the early practice of considering T. as a single saint, martyred on 17.
February.

Among the many noteworthy "eastern" churches associated with T. are:
his church (Mar Thedros) in Bahdidat, Lebanon, with its impressive
twelfth(?)-century mural paintings:
http://tinyurl.com/bqs88r
his eleventh-century church at Athens (restored, 1840; note that the caption
in Greek, following the early modern and modern practice of joint veneration
of the Recruit and the General, calls it that of the Holy Theodores
[plural]):
http://www.caed.kent.edu//History/Byzantine/stheodore1.jpg
http://tinyurl.com/2cwct4
http://www.artandarchitecture.org.uk/images/conway/cbbad8b0.html
His late thirteenth-century church at Mistra (or Mystra; in Greek, Mystras):
http://www.mistraestates.gr/images2/Mistras4big.jpg
http://odysseus.culture.gr/java/image?foto_id=10101&size=l1
http://www.viaggiaresempre.it/01GreciaMistraSanTeodoro.jpg
The later fourteenth-century church of T. (Fyodor) Stratilates at Veliky
Novgorod (1360-1361, with later additions):
http://www.adm.nov.ru/cdrom/images/Churches/24.jpg

Portraits of the two T.'s (early fourteenth-century) by Manuel Panselinos in
the frescoes of the Protaton Church on Mt. Athos (first Tiro, then
Stratilates):
http://www.eikastikon.gr/xristianika/panselinos/57.jpg
http://www.eikastikon.gr/xristianika/panselinos/59.jpg

A late fifteenth-century icon of T. Stratilates in the Museum of History and
Architecture, Novgorod:
http://tinyurl.com/dbzgoq

More images of T.:
http://www.ucc.ie/milmart/imgthd.html

An early testimony to T.'s cult in the "west" is his perhaps sixth-century
church at Rome.  An English-language account of it is here:
http://romanchurches.wikia.com/wiki/San_Teodoro
Some views:
http://philrome1997.free.fr/htm500/det/002_0102.htm
http://p.vtourist.com/1302809-San_Teodoro_Rome-Rome.jpg
http://tinyurl.com/33c8ej

T. was the early patron saint of Venice.  Here he is on his column there
(perhaps wondering how he's going to get back at the winged lion on the next
column who replaced him in that role):
http://relay.arglist.com/photos/20050527-005.jpg

In the early thirteenth century remains said to be T.'s were brought from
Euchaita to Brindisi (BR) in Puglia, where they were placed in the partly
silver container shown here:
http://www.brindisiweb.com/storia/foto/arca1.jpg
This panel illustrates the translation by which T. became Brindisi's patron
saint:
http://www.brindisiweb.com/arcidiocesi/foto/arca_part.jpg
Note the two columns in the representation of Brindisi: unlike those at
Venice (largely a medieval foundation), these were holdovers from the Roman
city.  They have since suffered earthquake damage and one is now at Lecce
(LE) on the Salentine peninsula, where it supports that city's statue of
Sant'Oronzo in the piazza of the same name.
For a fuller description (Italian-language) of this container, go here:
http://www.brindisiweb.com/arcidiocesi/santi/santeodoro.htm
Whereas that _objet d'art_ is now in the archdiocesan museum at Brindisi,
T.'s putative remains are kept in a chapel dedicated to him in that city's
cathedral:
http://tinyurl.com/2wml68

Two unorthodox interpretations of "Tiro":
http://tinyurl.com/2mrwrd
and here:
http://www.saintbarbara.org/about/icons/theodore.cfm


2)  Flavian, bishop of Constantinople (d. 449 or 450).  Prior to his
elevation in 446 he had been scevophylax of that city's Great Church (Hagia
Sophia).  In 448 he presided over a synod that condemned the monophysite
theologian Eutyches.  The latter, influential at court, was soon
rehabilitated by the so-called Robber Council of Ephesus (449).  That body
deposed F., who died shortly afterward (his supporters said that this was
from mistreatment).  In 451 F. was rehabilitated by the Council of Chalcedon
and declared a martyr.  His name, at least, was known in the West from his
being the addressee of pope St. Leo I's doctrinal letter known as the _Tome_
of Leo, adopted at Chalcedon.

F. too is a saint of the Regno.  In the central and southern Marche and in
northern Abruzzo there has long been devotion to a saint named Flavianus,
chiefly venerated on 24. November.  Although that F. has been thought of as
a local martyr bishop, from at least the later Middle Ages onward he has
been identified at times as the bishop of Constantinople.  In 1001,
supposedly, remains believed to be those of F. of Constantinople arrived
miraculously at today's Giulianova (TE) in Abruzzo, a place that in the
early Middle Ages had been called Castrum Novum but prior to its refounding
in 1470 by Giulio Antonio Acquaviva, duke of Atri and count of Teramo and of
Conversano (d. 1481 fighting Turks from Otranto) was known as Castel San
Flaviano.

In 1478 these relics, which had been kept in the town's principal church,
were brought to the crypt of its as yet unfinished successor, now
Giulianova's chiesa di San Flaviano, initially built as a free-standing
octagon (1472-ca. 1530), rebuilt and given its dome after the Spanish sack
of 1596, and restored in 1926 and in 1948ff.  Herewith two illustrated,
Italian-language accounts of this church:
http://www.giulianovaweb.it/guida/21.htm
http://tinyurl.com/c4f84y
Other views:
http://www.darnick.com/scoala/date/italia/turnx.jpg
http://tinyurl.com/c2wkxa
http://www.lattanzivini.it/San%20Flaviano.jpg
F.'s aforementioned relics are kept here:
http://tinyurl.com/bjs693
http://tinyurl.com/aukksw

In addition to Giulianova, F. is the patron saint of another former
Acquaviva possession, the town of Conversano (BA) in southern Apulia, where
though his feast is kept on 24. November he is identified as F. of
Constantinople.  And just to make things even more confusing, at Recanati
(MC) in the Marche, which has purported relics of an F. and whose originally
medieval cathedral is so dedicated, that F. is celebrated on 22. December
(the feast day of the legendary martyr F. of Rome) but is identified as F.
of Constantinople:
http://tinyurl.com/27ugs8


3)  Benedict of Dolia (d. 1120?).  Peter the Deacon's early twelfth-century
(ca. 1136) catalogue of holy people associated with the abbey of
Montecassino, the _Ortus et vita iustorum cenobii Casinensis_, relates in
chapter 46 that Constantine, a king (we would say, judge) of the Sardinians,
asked abbot Oderisius (i.e. Oderisius I; 1087-1105) to select a bishop for
him from one of the brothers.  O. selected Benedict, a man venerable in all
things.  While in office B. was noted -- so Peter tells us -- for the
following miracles:
  a) A great crowd of sparrows was in the habit of defecating all over his
cathedral, not even exempting the altar vessels.  When B. adjured them in
the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit to depart and make a mess no
more, they did so -- and none has dared to return.
  b) Saracen raiders in Sardinia reached B.'s cathedral and asked for the
bishop.  B. was standing before the altar, offering prayers, but they could
not see him.  Everyone they found they led off into captivity.  But they did
not find B., who was right in front of them.

B. has been identified as the bishop of Dolia who in 1112 confirmed a
donation made by his predecessor Virgilius (still in office in 1089).
Though Dolia (accented on the first syllable) was incorporated into the
diocese of Cagliari (also accented on the first syllable -- but you knew
that!) early in the sixteenth century, its medieval cathedral of San
Pantaleo remains as a parish church in today's Dolianova (CA).  Said to have
been begun in the latter half of the twelfth century and to have been
consecrated in 1289, it was preceded by an early medieval church traces of
which have been found during restoration of the present structure.
Here's an illustrated, Italian-language account of this monument:
http://web.tiscali.it/itgnervi/pantaleo.htm
Expandable versions of the views in the previous account are here:
http://www.stilepisano.it/immagini4/index12.htm


4)  Constabilis (d. 1124).  This less well known saint of the Regno (in
Italian, Costabile) was a child oblate at the then Cluniac monastery of the
Most Holy Trinity at today's Cava dei Tirreni (SA).  Late in life he became
its fourth abbot.  C. is the founder (in 1123) and patron of today's
Castellabate (SA), a former possession of the abbey on the coast of his
native Cilento in what is now southernmost Campania.  He is the Cilento's
only saint.  His cult was confirmed in 1893.

C. was at the head of a major and very wealthy regional institution.
Whereas subsequent expansion and rebuilding has vastly altered the abbey's
appearance, in the parts closest to the mountain against one of whose flanks
it is built (Monte Finestre, a.k.a. Monte Pertuso) there are notable
medieval survivals.  Though perhaps slightly later, the east side of the
cloister may be from C.'s tenure as abbot:
Plan:
http://tinyurl.com/r3fbg
Views:
http://community.webshots.com/photo/87698289/1087699105036367367BEqzgg
http://community.webshots.com/photo/87698289/1087699228036367367DUGmCv
http://community.webshots.com/photo/87698289/1087699168036367367PWsYPj
http://community.webshots.com/photo/87698289/1087699330036367367jslREb

Best,
John Dillon
(last year's post lightly revised)

**********************************************************************
To join the list, send the message: join medieval-religion YOUR NAME
to: [log in to unmask]
To send a message to the list, address it to:
[log in to unmask]
To leave the list, send the message: leave medieval-religion
to: [log in to unmask]
In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
[log in to unmask]
For further information, visit our web site:
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/medieval-religion.html

**********************************************************************
To join the list, send the message: join medieval-religion YOUR NAME
to: [log in to unmask]
To send a message to the list, address it to:
[log in to unmask]
To leave the list, send the message: leave medieval-religion
to: [log in to unmask]
In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
[log in to unmask]
For further information, visit our web site:
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/medieval-religion.html

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager