JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  February 2009

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION February 2009

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

saints of the day 13. February

From:

John Dillon <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 13 Feb 2009 17:47:14 -0600

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (120 lines)

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Today (13. February) is the feast day of:

1)  Archelaus, venerated in the diocese of Oristano (d. 100, supposedly).  A. is the patron saint of the diocese of Oristano in Sardinia, celebrated today in the cathedral as well in the city of Oristano (of which he is also the patron saint and where today is an official holiday).  Unattested in any surviving ancient or medieval sources, he is a product of the early seventeenth-century "corpi santi" episode in Sardinia, when early Christian gravesites were excavated for human remains associated with an inscription conducing to the identification of a saint.  In 1615 A. turned up in the archbishop of Oristano's search for the remains of the attested St. Luxurius (Lussorius, etc.) in the crypt the latter's church at today's Fordongianus (OR), anciently Forum Traiani.  A.'s sepulchral inscription (CIL X. 1120*) read as follows:
Hic iacet b.m. Archelaus presbiter obit
quarto Kal. septembres
to which some idiot added "an. 100", causing the entire inscription to be stigmatized as a probable forgery when it was edited early in the last century for the _Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum_ (hence the asterisk in its CIL number).  As was customary during this episode, the "b.m." of the inscription was interpreted not as _bonae memoriae_ but rather as _beatus martyr_.

Within a few days of their discovery A.'s remains were taken to the cathedral of Santa Maria Assunta at Oristano, where today they are housed in the chapel shown here:
http://blogs.dotnethell.it/images/10831.jpg
http://blogs.dotnethell.it/images/10830.jpg
Much rebuilt, Oristano's cathedral retains a little early twelfth-century (1130) original construction at the base of the fifteenth-century belltower (with eighteenth-century cupola):
http://tinyurl.com/2fuztt
http://tinyurl.com/29f6rw
Here are views of the Cappella del Rimedio in the fourteenth-century transept and of a window in the same part of the building:
http://tinyurl.com/yqa886
http://tinyurl.com/37fnsf
The cathedral owns the fifteenth-century monstrance shown here:
http://www.diocesioristano.it/pic_display.asp?id=942

A.'s translation to the cathedral of Oristano is thought to have taken place on 11. February.  Why his feast now occurs on 13. February is not clear.  At Fordongianus, where A. is the co-titular of the modern church of Santi Pietro e Archelao, he is celebrated on 29. August (his date of death as recorded in the inscription).

OK, so that wasn't very medieval.  By way of compensation, herewith an Italian-language account (with good photographs) of the originally late twelfth- or early thirteenth-century church of San Lussorio in which A.'s remains were found:
http://web.tiscali.it/romanicosardo/mioweb4/fordongianus.htm
Exterior views of the church and views of the crypt and its restored frescos are here:
http://www.forumtraiani.it/index1.html?/gchiesaest1.html
(for the second page, click on the arrow at lower right).  The last three photographs on this page
http://spazioinwind.libero.it/guysca/fordongianus.htm
are expandable views of the crypt showing more detail.


2)  Fusca and Maura, martyrs (?).  According to their Passio (BHL 3222, 3222c, 3223), F. was the fifteen-year-old daughter of a pagan family in Ravenna who together with her nurse M. was baptized in the Christian faith.  She could not be persuaded by her father to apostasize.  After she refused to sacrifice to pagan idols, she was tortured on the orders of the governor Quintianus.  Finally killed with a sword-thrust, F. as she was dying asked that the same mercy be shown to M. (who was being tortured with her).  Her request was granted and M. met her end in the same way.

Identifying the Quintianus of this story with the official of the same name who in her Latin acta is said to have ordered the execution of St. Agatha, early modern martyrologists ascribed the events in question to the Decian persecution.  But no version of this Passio that has reached print is so specific.  Moreover, this seems to be a very late Passio, in origin perhaps no earlier than the eleventh century.  Its earliest witnesses are said to be late eleventh- or early twelfth-century (an unpublished text in a passionary at Bologna) and twelfth-century (a fragmentary passionary from Rimini; BHL 3222c), respectively.  The Passio documents a cult of Fusca initially localized in formerly Byzantine parts of northern Italy and later extended throughout the Veneto, Friuli - Venzia Giulia, and Istria.  The cult's oldest recorded attestation is from the ninth-century Veneto.  Our early sources from Ravenna itself are silent about it.

Most versions of their Passio end with a translation story in which the bodies of F. and M. arrived, miraculously or by the action of pirates, at Sabratha in Tripolitania (in today's Libya) and were there buried; centuries later they were brought back to Christendom, either to Ravenna (BHL 3233; thirteenth-century) or to Torcello in the northern part of the Venetian lagoon (BHL 3222; sixteenth-century), and a church was built to house their remains.  As there is no evidence for the dedication of any church to F. _and M._, it could be that both Maura ("Moor") and the African locale from which their relics are said to have been returned are hagiographic inventions inspired by the name Fusca ("Darkish One").  M. could also be the Maura venerated since at least the later Middle Ages in the Ionian Islands of western Greece, where she's now identified as the M. of Timothy and Maura, martyrs celebrated on 3. May.

Though neither F. nor M. is now entered in the RM, each is venerated separately in the Veneto.  The oldest surviving church dedicated to F. is Santa Fosca at Torcello, an originally late eleventh-/early twelfth-century structure connected by a colonnade to Torcello's much older ex-cathedral of the Blessed Virgin (the former cathedral of the diocese of Altino in exile).
Plan:
http://tinyurl.com/2m88h2
Views:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Torcello_2.jpg
http://tinyurl.com/ywrphl
http://tinyurl.com/2tf8x5
http://tinyurl.com/2ue553
Marjorie Greene's views, in Medrelart:
http://medrelart.shutterfly.com/375

The chiesa [di] Santa Fosca in the _frazione_ of Santa Fosca in Selva di Cadore (BL) in the Dolomites is an early fifteenth-century rebuilding (consecrated, 1438) of an earlier church of the same dedication.  Here's an illustrated, Italian-language site on it (click on "Notizie storiche", expand the box that comes up, and use its drop-down menu):
http://tinyurl.com/cvejdj
Other views:
http://tinyurl.com/cktjk8
http://hohenadl.de/chiesa.jpg
http://static.panoramio.com/photos/original/9703153.jpg
http://mw2.google.com/mw-panoramio/photos/medium/9637375.jpg
Here's a brief video with views of the interior:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1OLnWnc4Es


3)  Castor of Karden (or of Koblenz; d. 4th cent., supposedly).  In 836 archbishop Hetto of Trier translated C. from a place that's now Karden in Treis-Karden (Lkr. Cochem-Zell) in Rheinland-Pfalz into a church he had built for him at Koblenz.  According to C.'s rather later Vita (BHL 1642; oldest witness is thirteenth-century), C. thus became the patron saint of Koblenz, which latter had not had one previously.  The same Vita provides a legendary back story for C. in which he is trained up in the church at Trier under bishop St. Maximinus (who ordains C. deacon and then priest) and then becomes at hermit at Karden, where he attracts disciples, dies on this day, and is buried in a local church.  Much later, in the time of bishop Weomad (r., 762-91), when C. is already being honored with a cult, his remains are  miraculously revealed and he is given a formal elevatio in the the church of St. Paulinus at Karden.

Thus far the Vita, which also recounts a miracle whereby the crew of a cargo vessel laden with salt denies some to C. and is promptly sunk in the Mosel by a violent storm.  When the floundering crew repents, C. makes a sign of the cross and the vessel arises unharmed from underneath the water.

C.'s church at Koblenz was rebuilt in the twelfth century and was restored late in the nineteenth.  Here's a plan of the Basilika St. Castor:
http://tinyurl.com/2alwyp
Some views:
http://www.globopix.de/detail.asp?idi=18&i=11&pagina=9
http://tinyurl.com/2h586l
http://tinyurl.com/2fyvbv

An originally medieval church dedicated to C. also exists at Treis-Karden:
http://www.treis-karden-mosel.de/stiftskirche.html
That page's assertion that C. came from Aquitaine relies on a dubious inference from the Vita.  The canonry to which this church belonged was from the late ninth century until its dissolution in 1802 the seat of an administrative district of the archdiocese of Trier.  For its history, see Ferdinand Pauly, _Das Stift St. Kastor in Karden an der Mosel_ (Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 1986; = Germania Sacra, N. F., Bd. 19, Tl. 3).


4)  Peter I of Vercelli (d. 997).  The first of two sainted bishops of the Piedmontese city of Vercelli to be named Petrus, our P. commenced his episcopate in 978.  Although nothing of his earlier life is known, his apparently faithful adherence to the Ottonian cause in Italy has led many to suppose that he may have been German.

In 997 P. was put to death at the order of Arduin of Ivrea, not yet proclaimed king of Italy but already a thorn in the imperial side.  His body, laid to rest in his cathedral, became the focal point of a cult unfavorable to Arduin, who retaliated by having the building set on fire.  A purely local saint, P. is celebrated liturgically only in the Archdiocese of Vercelli.  Unlike Adelpretus II (Albert) of Trent, another bishop seemingly slain for political reasons, he is not listed in the new version (2001) of the RM.

Vercelli's present cathedral is largely neoclassical.  But its belltower is not:
http://tinyurl.com/39gq3f
http://tinyurl.com/2pndct
And the cathedral does have this lovely thirteenth(?)-century silver crucifix:
http://tinyurl.com/38o8ja

Some of the Archdiocese's early medieval treasures are shown here (incl., for students of Old English, a page from the Vercelli Book):
http://www.archeovercelli.it/duomo.html

More medieval in appearance than the cathedral is Vercelli's formerly abbatial church of Sant'Andrea:
http://tinyurl.com/9xw95
http://www.valsesiascuole.it/crosior/1medioevo/comune66.jpg
Two entire pages on this monument are here (most views expandable):
http://tinyurl.com/2vznff
http://tinyurl.com/3y3jom


5)  Jordan of Saxony (Bl.; d. 1237).  The Westphalian-born J., then a recent Master of Arts at Paris, met St. Dominic of Caleruega in 1219 and was urged by him to join the Order of Preachers.  In  the following year, when he had become both a deacon and Bachelor of Theology, J. did exactly that.  He rose quickly in the order, succeeding Dominic as Master General in 1222.  J. traveled widely, preached well, and received other persons of talent into the order, among them St. Albertus Magnus.  The first Dominican writer of note, he is known for his little history of the order's beginnings, the _Libellus de principiis Ordinis Praedicatorum_, for his letters, and for various academic writings.  J.'s sermons have been edited recently by Paul-Bernard Hodel: _Beati Iordanis de Saxonia Sermones_ (Roma: Institutum Historicum Ordinis Fratrum Praedicatorum, 2005).

J. perished in a shipwreck off Pamphylia while returning to Europe from a visit to the order's Province of the Holy Land.  His body was brought to Ptolemais/Acre/Akko and buried in the Dominican church there.  J. has been venerated within the Order of Preachers since at least shortly after his death.  His cult was confirmed in 1826.  Here's J.'s portrait by Beato Angelico among the Dominican worthies in the chapter house of San Marco in Florence:
http://tinyurl.com/2z5ulf
Context of this roundel:
http://tinyurl.com/2c6w7x 

Best,
John Dillon
(last year's posts combined and revised)

**********************************************************************
To join the list, send the message: join medieval-religion YOUR NAME
to: [log in to unmask]
To send a message to the list, address it to:
[log in to unmask]
To leave the list, send the message: leave medieval-religion
to: [log in to unmask]
In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
[log in to unmask]
For further information, visit our web site:
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/medieval-religion.html

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager