JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for ZOOARCH Archives


ZOOARCH Archives

ZOOARCH Archives


ZOOARCH@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

ZOOARCH Home

ZOOARCH Home

ZOOARCH  December 2008

ZOOARCH December 2008

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: Mortality patterns in cattle (Bos sp.) bibliography tabulated

From:

"Richard H. Meadow" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Richard H. Meadow

Date:

Wed, 17 Dec 2008 14:03:49 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (157 lines)

Many thanks to all who submitted titles in response to my query about 
cattle (Bos) exploitation practices as reflected in kill-off patterns. 
As promised, I have collated the titles and present them to you below. 
If you find anything of significance to be missing or any obvious 
errors, please do let me know. (Note: I have not done much 
standardization of the titles submitted.)
Thanks again, and Happy Holidays to one and all.
Richard H. Meadow
Zooarchaeology Lab.
Peabody Museum, Harvard University
-------------------------------------------------
Results to date (17 December 2008) of the following enquiry posted on 
the Zooarch Listserv on 4 December 2008 by Richard H. Meadow:
"Not being familiar with much of the zooarchaeological work in Britain, 
could I ask for the titles of what you consider some good reports on 
cattle (Bos) exploitation practices as reflected in kill-off patterns 
documented using tooth eruption and wear and/or epiphyseal union. 
Examples from the continent would also be appropriate. I am particularly 
interested in the methodologies being employed, age ranges defined, and 
interpretations of the ageing data. Titles of reports, monographs, and 
articles would all be welcome."

Albarella, U. and Davis, S. (1996) Mammals and birds from Launceston 
Castle, Cornwall: decline in status and the rise of agriculture. Circaea 
12: 1-156.

Audoin-Rouzeau, F. (1992) Approche archéozoologique du commerce des 
viandes au Moyen Age. Anthropozoologica 16:83-92.

Crabtree, Pam J. (1989) West Stow, Suffolk: Early Anglo-Saxon Animal 
Husbandry. East Anglian Archaeology 47. Suffolk County Planning 
Department, Ipswich.

Entwistle, R., and A. Grant (1989) Evidence for Cereal Cultivation and 
Animal Husbandry in the Southern British Neolithic and Bronze Age. In 
Beginnings of Agriculture, pp. 203-215: Oxford : B.A.R.

Grant, A. (2000) Diet, economy and ritual evidence from the faunal 
remains. In M. Fulford and J. Timby, Late Iron Age and Roman Silchester: 
Excavations on the Site of the Forum-Basilica, 1980-86. London: 
Britannia Monograph 15: 425-82.

Grigson, C. (1999) The mammalian remains. In A. Whittle, J. Pollard and 
C. Grigson, The Harmony of Symbols: the Windmill Hill Causewayed 
Enclosure. Oxford: Oxbow: 164-252.

Halstead, P. (1998) Mortality Models and Milking: Problems of 
Uniformitarianism, Optimality, and Equfinality Reconsidered. 
Anthropozoologica 27:3-20.

Hambleton, E. (1999) Animal Husbandry Regimes in Iron Age Britain. 
Oxford: BAR (BS) 282.

Hamilton, J. (1978) A comparison of the age structure at mortality of 
some Iron Age and Romano-British cattle and sheep populations. In: 
Parrington, M. (ed) The excavation of an Iron Age settlement, Bronze Age 
ring ditches and Roman features at Ashville Trading Estate, Abingdon 
(Oxfordshire) 1974-6. London: CBA Research Report 28, pp. 126-133.

Johanmsen, Niels Nørkjaer. (2006) Draught cattle and the South 
Scandinavian economies of the 4th millennium BC. Environmental 
Archaeology 11(1): 35-48.

Legge, A.J. (1989) Milking the evidence; a reply to Entwhistle and 
Grant. In: The Beginnings of Agriculture (Eds. A. Milles, D. Williams 
and N. Gardner) Oxford: British Archaeological Reports International 
Series 496, 217-242.

Legge, A.T. (1991) The animal remains from six sites at Down Farm, 
Woodcutts. In J. Barrett, R. Bradley and A. Hall, Papers on the 
Prehistoric Archaeology of Cranborne Chase 54-99.

Legge, A.J. (1992) Excavations at Grimes Graves, Norfolk: 1972-1976. 
Fascicle 4: Animals, Environment and the Bronze Age Economy. London: 
British Museum Press.

Legge, A.J. (2005) Milk Use in Prehistory. In The Zooarchaeology and 
Fats, Oils Milk and Dairying. Eds. J. Mulville and A. Outram. Oxford, 
Oxbow, 8-13.

Locker, A. (2000) Animal bone. In A. Lawson, Potterne 1982-5: Animal 
Husbandry in Later Prehistoric Wiltshire. Salisbury: Wessex Archaeology 
Report 17: 101-19.

Luff, R-M (1993) Animal Bones from Excavations in Colchester 1971-85. 
Colchester Archaeological Trust Archaeological Report 12.

Maltby, M. (1981) Iron Age, Romano-British and Anglo-Saxon animal 
husbandry - a review of the faunal evidence. In M. Jones and G. Dimbleby 
(eds.), The Environment of Man: the Iron Age to the Anglo-Saxon Period, 
pp. 155-203.

Maltby, M. (1989) Urban-rural variations in the butchering of cattle in 
Romano-British Hampshire, in Diet and Crafts in Towns, vol. 199. Edited 
by D. Sergeantson and T. Waldron, pp. 75-106. Oxford: B.A.R. British series.

Maltby, M. (1994) The meat supply in Roman Dorchester and Winchester. In 
A.R. Hall and H.K. Kenward (eds.), Urban-Rural Connexions: Perspectives 
from Environmental Archaeology. Symposia of the Association for 
Environmental Archaeology 12/ Oxbow Monograph 47: 85-102.

McCormick, F. (1992) Early Faunal Evidence for Dairying. Oxford Journal 
of Archaeology 11 :201-209.

McCormick, F. (1998) Calf Slaughter as a Response to Marginality, in 
Life on the Edge: Human Settlement and Marginality. Edited by G. Coles 
and C. M. Mills, pp. 49-51. Oxford: Oxbow Books.

Mulville, 1., J. Bond, and O. Craig (2005) The White Stuff, Milking in 
the Outer Scottish Isles," in The Zooarchaeology ofFats, Oils, Milk and 
Dairying. Edited by J. Mulville and A. K. Outram, pp. 167-182. Oxford: 
Oxbow.

O'Connor, T. (1989) Bones from Anglo-Scandinavian Levels at 16-22 
Coppergate. The Archaeology of York (ed. P. Addyman) Volume 15: Fascicule 3.

O'Connor, T. (1991) Bones from 46-54 Fishergate. The Archaeology of York 
(ed. P. Addyman) Volume 15: Fascicule 4.
Olsen, S. L. (1994) Exploitation of Mammals at the Early Bronze Age Site 
of West Row Fen (Mildenhall 165), Suffolk, England. Annals of Carnegie 
Museum 63:115-153.

Payne, S. (1982) The use of early 19th century data in ageing cattle 
mandibles from archaeological sites, and the relationship between the 
eruption of M3 and P4 Circaea 2: 77-82

Ryan, K. 2005) Facilitating Milk Let-Down in Traditional Cattle Herding 
Systems: East Africa and Beyond," in The Zooarchaeology of Fats, Oils, 
Milk and Dairying. Edited by J. Mulville and A. K. Outram, pp. 96-106. 
Oxford: Oxbow.

Serjeantson, D., Waldron, T. and McCracken, S. (1986) Veal and Calfskin 
in eighteenth Century Lingston? London Archaeologist 5(9):227-231

Sykes, N.J. (2006) From Cu and Sceap to Beffe and Motton: The managment, 
distribution and consumption of cattle and sheep in medieval England. In 
(Woolgar, C.M, Serjeantson, d. and Waldron, T. (eds.) Food in Medieval 
England: Diet and Nutrition. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 56-71

Thomas, R. (2005) Animals, Economy and Status: The Integration of 
Zooarchaeological and Historical Evidence in the Study of Dudley Castle, 
West Midlands (c.1100-1750). British Archaeological Reports British 
Series 392. Archaeopress, Oxford.

Wilson, B. (1994) Mortality patterns, animal husbandry and marketing in 
and around medieval and post-medieval Oxford. In A. Hall and H. Kenwasrd 
(eds.), Urban-Rural Connexions: Perspectives from Environmental 
Archaeology, pp. 103-16.

Wilson, Bob, Julie Hamilton, Don Bromwell, and Philip Armitage. (1978) 
"The animal bones," in The Excavation of an Iron Age Settlement, Bronze 
Age Ring Ditches, and Roman Features at Ashebille Trading Estate, 
Abingdon (Oxfordshire), 1974-1976, edited by M. Parrington, pp. 110-139. 
London: Council for British Archaeology (Research Report 28). (available 
online at 
http://ads.ahds.ac.uk/catalogue/adsdata/cbaresrep/pdf/028/02804017.pdf 
and subsequent files that are linked)

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JISCMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000


WWW.JISCMAIL.AC.UK

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager