JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Archives


MEDIEVAL-RELIGION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION Home

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION  September 2008

MEDIEVAL-RELIGION September 2008

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

saints of the day 8. September

From:

John Dillon <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

medieval-religion - Scholarly discussions of medieval religious culture <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 8 Sep 2008 01:48:52 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (110 lines)

medieval-religion: Scholarly discussions of medieval religion and culture

Today (8. September) is the feast day of:

1)  The Nativity of Blessed Virgin Mary.  This feast originated in fifth-century Jerusalem at a church honoring her birth and spread slowly, being first attested at Rome only in the pontificate of St. Sergius I (687-701; no. 3 below).  Herewith a few visuals:
a)  A German-language page and various views of the early thirteenth-century Pfarrkirche "Unsere liebe Frau Mariae Geburt" in Schöngrabern (Niederösterreich):
http://www.archiv-verlag.at/inhalte/loseblatt/noearchiv1.html
http://tinyurl.com/5p3xwx
http://www.burgenseite.com/cpg132/thumbnails.php?album=5
The apse before cleaning:
http://tinyurl.com/5fnmvy
b)  Two English-language accounts and some views of the early thirteenth- to early sixteenth-century cathedral of the Nativity of the Mother of God at Suzdal (Vladimir):
http://tinyurl.com/65p7qs
http://tinyurl.com/6rrpnl
http://tinyurl.com/62osx5
http://tinyurl.com/6jlt2k
http://www.uncp.edu/home/rwb/suzdal1.jpg
There are some good views of the building in the fifth row from the top here (incl. a detail view of portal carvings):
http://tinyurl.com/6rdsrs
c)  Giotto's fresco of the Birth of Mary (ca. 1305) in the Cappella dei Scrovegni in Padua:
http://tinyurl.com/55bduy
d)  Milan's cathedral, begun in 1376 and dedicated to Santa Maria Nascente (the vast majority of cathedral dedications to the BVM in Italy are to Mary of the Assumption):
http://www.sacred-destinations.com/italy/milan-duomo.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milan_Cathedral
http://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/milancath/duomo.html
http://www.duomomilano.it/ground1024_en.html  


2)  Hadrian of Nicomedia (d. early 4th cent., supposedly).  H. (also Adrian) and his spouse Natalia are the subjects of several legendary, originally late antique Passiones in Greek (BHG 27-29) and in Latin (BHL 3744-3745e) that make him a member of the emperor's bodyguard (which emperor it is varies in these accounts) who at Nicomedia is so moved by the constancy of Christian prisoners under torture during the Great Persecution that he publicly declares himself a Christian also and is martyred with what are now his fellow prisoners.  Natalia, who is secretly a Christian, encourages her husband and after his death buries his body at what later becomes the Constantinopolitan suburb of Argyropolis. 

In Greek-Rite churches H. and N., both considered saints, are celebrated on 26. August.  In the Roman Rite, H. alone is celebrated and on this day, in commemoration of pope Honorius I's consecration, in about 630, of a church dedicated to him in the Roman Forum.  The church of Sant'Adriano al Foro was several times rebuilt; it lasted until the 1930s, when it was demolished under Mussolini in order to restore the older Roman structure into which it had been built, the Curia Julia.  Some of its frescoes were detached and are now in the Crypta Balbi, e.g.:
http://tinyurl.com/57r6rp

A tenth-century dedication in Italy to both H. and N. was the church of the monastery founded by St. Nilus of Rossano and then directed by his successor St. Proclus of Bisignano at today's San Demetrio Corone (CS) in Calabria.  Rebuilt in the late eleventh century when it was briefly a dependency of the abbey of the Most Holy Trinity at today's Cava de' Tirreni (SA) in Campania, it became an archimandrital church in 1115 as part of Roger II's re-organization of the Basilian houses in his domains.  Ferrando I reconfirmed the monastery's privileges in 1472.  After the monastery's suppression in 1794 its church passed to an arm of what is now the Italo-Greek Catholic Church and has continued to serve a liturgically Greek population initially made up of Albanians whom Ferrando resettled in 1471 in San Dimitrio (as the town was called then).
An illustrated, Italian-language site on this monument is here:
http://www.arbitalia.it/speciali/sant.adriano/mazziotti_indice.htm
and the Italia nell'Arte Medievale's page on it is here:
http://tinyurl.com/f7j7v  
Other expandable views of some of the mosaic figures in the pavement are here:
http://tinyurl.com/5oq5s9
http://tinyurl.com/64hxdp

At the other end of Italy, some views of the originally eleventh-/twelfth-century chiesa di Sant'Adriano at Olgelasca, a locality of Brenna (CO) in Lombardy:
http://www.iubilantes.it/i/gallery/120/12151014610003.JPG
http://tinyurl.com/6x7crd
http://tinyurl.com/6xt8wm
http://tinyurl.com/5kvhss
http://tinyurl.com/645pn2
http://tinyurl.com/643vh4

Some illustrated, Dutch-language pages on the originally fourteenth-and fifteenth-century Sint Adriaanskerk (restored, 1959-68) in Dreischor, a locality of Schouwen-Duiveland (Zeeland):
http://www.dreischor.com/nl/dekerk.php
http://www.buurtatlas.nl/Sint_Adriaanskerk_Dreischor
Other views:
http://tinyurl.com/5u5uha
http://tinyurl.com/5k2hsp

A. as depicted by Hans Memling on the left wing of his Triptych of Adriaan Reins (1480), now in the Memlingmuseum at Brugge/Bruges:
http://tinyurl.com/6gk5a8

An illustrated, French-language page (expandable views, mostly towards the foot of the page) of the originally late fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century chapelle Saint-Adrien at Saint-Barthélemy (Morbihan):
http://tinyurl.com/5c7zcb

A. is said to have been killed by having his limbs struck off over an anvil.  Not altogether surprisingly, he became a patron of butchers and of smiths.  Herewith a couple of late fifteenth- and sixteenth-century images showing his standard iconography (soldier holding in his right hand an upwards-pointing sword, in his left an anvil):
a)  Two images of a page from a later fifteenth-century Flemish illumination (from Gent/Gand) showing Louis XI of France and his queen Charlotte de Savoie at prayer before an altarpiece of A. (Wien, Nationalbibliothek, ms. 2619, fol. 3v):
http://tinyurl.com/642bse
http://tinyurl.com/5l6w6r
b)  A. (at right) as depicted in the later fifteenth-century chapel frescoes of the château of Montreuil-Bellay (Maine-et-Loire):
http://tinyurl.com/5pnpor
c)  An illumination from a later fifteenth- or early sixteenth-century Flemish Book of Hours (from Brugge/Bruges; Syracuse, NY, Syracuse University Library, ms. 7, fol. 205r):
http://tinyurl.com/5ll3js
d)  Statue of A., from somewhere in Seine-Maritime (Bosc-Guérard-Saint-Adrien? Cany-Barville?), shown at an exposition at the château de Martainville-Epreville, May 2006 - January 2007:
http://tinyurl.com/6ljtvn


3)  Sergius I, pope (d. 701).  S. was born at Palermo of émigré parents from Antioch on the Orontes.  During the pontificate of St. Adeodatus (II; 672-76) he moved to Rome where he later became titular priest of Santa Susanna on the Quirinal.  In 687 he was elected pope in a compromise between factions supporting the candidacies of the archdeacon Paschal and the archpriest Theodore.  To secure the approval of the exarch in Ravenna S. was obliged to made a very large donation in gold previously promised by the unsuccessful Paschal (whom S. promptly packed off to a monastery).

S.'s pontificate is notable chiefly for his refusal to subscribe to the acts of the Quinisext Council (Council in Trullo; 692), whose canon 36 affirmed the equal authority of the sees of Rome and Constantinople.  Justinian II's attempt resolve this situation by having S. arrested and brought to the imperial capital was thwarted when the militias of Ravenna and the Pentapolis sided with S. and effectively imprisoned Justinian's emissary in the Lateran until S. allowed him to return in disgrace to Constantinople.  (Justinian was overthrown in a coup in 695; his successors, who had more pressing matters to attend to, appear not to have pursued the matter.)

In other highlights, S. had the remains of pope St. Leo I translated in 688 to a newly ornamented resting place in (old) St. Peter's.  In 689 he baptised the recently abdicated king Cædwalla of Wessex and authorised the latter's burial in St. Peter's a week or so later.  In 693 he approved St. Willibrord's first mission to Frisia and two years later, on W.'s return to Rome, consecrated him archbishop of the Frisians.  In 700, after the Council of Pavia, he received the submission of Aquileia, thus ending the "Three Chapters" schism.  The introduction of the Agnus Dei into the Mass has been attributed to S.; likewise the start of Roman processions on the greater Marian feasts.

In an a development of the legend of St, Hubert of Liège unknown to his Carolingian hagiographers, the saint's twelfth-century Third Vita (BHL 4000) relates that when H. was on his way to Rome on pilgrimage an angel appeared to pope Sergius in a dream, revealed to him that bishop St. Lambert of Tongeren-Maastricht had just been murdered and, producing L.'s pastoral staff, bade him consecrate as his successor the already divinely elected H., who would be arriving in Rome that day.  S. awoke, found the staff next to him, made sure that he was informed about arriving pilgrims, and managed to notify H. of these events that very day.  A version of that tale in which the angel also brings to S. Lambert's priestly vestments seems to underly this fifteenth-century panel painting that has been attributed variously to Rogier van der Weyden and to a late fifteenth-century follower and is now in the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles:
http://www.abcgallery.com/W/weyden/workshop3.html
Detail (S. asleep):
http://tinyurl.com/5j7pbb


4)  Corbinian  (d. ca. 725).  C. is documented through a not awfully reliable Vita by Arbeo, bishop of Freising (d. 784).  According to this account (BHL 1947), C. was a Frank who after fourteen years as a hermit in the vicinity of today's Melun (Seine-et-Marne) went to Rome and was there consecrated a missionary bishop.  He was active in Bavarian territory both in the South Tirol, where he is said to have died at Kains (near Merano), and in and around Freising, where he is credited with having founded a predecessor of the former abbey of Weihenstephan.  Arbeo's Vita of C. was written for the occasion of the translation of his remains from Kains to Freising.

Legendarily, C. is said to have compelled a bear that had killed his packmule to replace it as his beast of burden on a journey across the Alps to Rome.  The bear bearing a pack is Freising's heraldic animal (as we've been reminded recently in the discussion of Moors, His Holiness Benedict XVI has placed Freising charges on his papal coat of arms; one of these is C.'s bear).  C. is also credited with the miraculous appearance of a spring at the site of Weihenstephan that later lay dormant until it bubbled forth again at his translation.  Here's an expandable view of a late fifteenth-century panel painting of C. at his spring:
http://aeiou.iicm.tugraz.at/aeiou.history.docs/000134.htm
And here's a view of a late fifteenth-century painting (by Jan Polack) of C. and the bear:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Corbinian_polack.jpg

Best,
John Dillon
(Sergius I and Corbinian revised from last year's post)

**********************************************************************
To join the list, send the message: join medieval-religion YOUR NAME
to: [log in to unmask]
To send a message to the list, address it to:
[log in to unmask]
To leave the list, send the message: leave medieval-religion
to: [log in to unmask]
In order to report problems or to contact the list's owners, write to:
[log in to unmask]
For further information, visit our web site:
http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/medieval-religion.html

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager