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POETRYETC  June 2008

POETRYETC June 2008

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Subject:

Re: The lyric poem - what be its current fate?

From:

Halvard Johnson <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Poetryetc: poetry and poetics

Date:

Sun, 29 Jun 2008 12:44:47 -0500

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Even the NEA nowadays lets one count some online publications
toward its publication requirement. Up to 50%, unless that's
changed.

Hal

"Getting shot hurts."
            --Ronald Reagan

Halvard Johnson
================
[log in to unmask]
http://home.earthlink.net/~halvard/index.html
http://entropyandme.blogspot.com
http://imageswithoutwords.blogspot.com
http://www.hamiltonstone.org
http://home.earthlink.net/~halvard/vidalocabooks.html







On Jun 29, 2008, at 12:17 PM, TheOldMole wrote:

> I would say this can't last forever. Online-only magazines like  
> Cortland Review have lineups as prestigious as any print magazine.
>
> I always send out a email to a pretty large mailing list when I have  
> a poem published online, and most of those actually go to the site  
> and read my work, and many of them go on to read more of the virtual  
> journal, so at least a tiny enlargement of the poetry audience is  
> created.
>
> M. Borges Accardi wrote:
>> For whatever it is worth,?places like Guggenheim do not consider  
>> "virtual" publication as publication credits.? Perhaps things will  
>> change in time, but, for now, this is the case for many grants and  
>> residencies.? Probably true too for academic publishing?
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Anny Ballardini <[log in to unmask]>
>> To: [log in to unmask]
>> Sent: Sun, 29 Jun 2008 7:56 am
>> Subject: Re: The lyric poem - what be its current fate?
>>
>>
>>
>> Opps,
>> I think that Internet publishing is a publication, the fact that it  
>> is
>> "virtual" instead of "real" does not affect me that much. It even  
>> partly
>> appeases my guilty feelings for the destruction of trees to buy  
>> paper and
>> stack it in my library bursting new books I have not had the time  
>> to read
>> until now. And I do read a lot on the net, instead.
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sat, Jun 28, 2008 at 9:03 PM, Joseph Duemer <[log in to unmask]>  
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Ed, ouch! I guess the internet is a "literary catheter" & you're  
>>> right I
>>> don't really believe internet publication is "real" publication (I  
>>> know, I
>>> know), but yeah the cure is to keep on writing & writing to think.  
>>> I hardly
>>> know what I think until I have written it & the poem, lyric or  
>>> narrative,
>>> for me, is a mode of thought. I think that's what it's good for,  
>>> to sort of
>>> go back to Stephen'[s original question. The structures &  
>>> constructions
>>> required to make a poem offer a resistance to the chaos of sense
>>> impressions
>>> / impingements involved in living. The poem is how we map where &  
>>> what we
>>> are. OK, I get that much. Why, then, should any kind of  
>>> publication be
>>> required? (I think I have something like an answer to this  
>>> question, but am
>>> curious what others will say.)
>>>
>>> jd
>>>
>>> On Sat, Jun 28, 2008 at 2:46 PM, edward mycue <[log in to unmask]>  
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> joseph, the "condition" (of not having recent poems accepted) may  
>>>> have
>>> much
>>>> to do with the changeover from the exclusively written publication
>>> sources
>>>> to the broader internet (which we "accept" but really don't  
>>>> believe in as
>>>> much as even publication of  very small press magazine  
>>>> publication issues
>>>> that were likened often to kleenex--used and discarded--). ARE  
>>>> YOU SURE
>>> IT'S
>>>> RUST? says the little cockroach on the keyboard when my genie from
>>> between
>>>> my ears suggested pensively that i'd slowed as i maundred  
>>>> dawdling  abt
>>> what
>>>> to do fustigating my failing self-regard in great danger of  
>>>> becoming
>>>> annihilating narcissism and blaming it on age-deprived oils of  
>>>> youth.
>>>>
>>>> of course i counter: just press on regardless!
>>>> but does work truthfully? my inner george carlin parries & thrusts.
>>>>
>>>> i think it's physical: think of bladder infection when you have a
>>>> bladderful.  forcing is not the answer here.  you need the literary
>>>> equivalent of a catheter perhaps. (what would that be?)
>>>>
>>>> keep writing?!  yes! (but keep at near remove a device to relieve
>>>> remembering  the lawrence fixel comparison of poets' having the  
>>>> imaginary
>>>> carrot and imaginary stick vs. the real carrot and stick that  
>>>> writers of
>>>> plays, screenplays, & other narratives have.)
>>>>
>>>> edward mycue
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --- On Sat, 6/28/08, Joseph Duemer <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>> From: Joseph Duemer <[log in to unmask]>
>>>> Subject: Re: The lyric poem - what be its current fate?
>>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>>> Date: Saturday, June 28, 2008, 6:11 AM
>>>>
>>>> *Stephen writes:* "Without this surrounding labor of critical  
>>>> community,
>>> so
>>>> many often extraordinarily fine lyric poems - let alone larger  
>>>> forms. -
>>> end
>>>> up fleeting around, or become paralysed in a kind of statuary  
>>>> limbo. They
>>>> may vibrantly appear in a small publication, then disappear as  
>>>> readily.
>>> For
>>>> the poet it takes a fierce stubbornness to put up with can appear  
>>>> as an
>>>> almost instant annihilation or a perennial sense of being 'not  
>>>> quite dead
>>>> on
>>>> arrival'."
>>>>
>>>> This has certainly been my recent experience, both as reader and  
>>>> writer.
>>>> Poets have almost always worked the liminal edges of American  
>>>> culture,
>>> but
>>>> the edges seem to have become cliffs in recent decades, with  
>>>> poets &
>>> poems
>>>> dropping out sight leaving hardly a trace -- not even a fading  
>>>> cartoon
>>>> scream followed by a thud & a puff of dust. That would be  
>>>> something, at
>>>> least. Stephen is right, I think, to note the effect of recent  
>>>> American
>>>> politics on all kind of cultural habits, the trend starts before  
>>>> Bush's
>>>> completely demoralizing presidency. The country seems mostly dead  
>>>> to me,
>>>> without affect, lost in a vaguely buzzing media haze in which the  
>>>> idea of
>>> a
>>>> lyric poem has no place.
>>>>
>>>> Speaking for myself, I've come to think of the poems I'm writing  
>>>> now as
>>>> posthumous works. After a career of moderate success getting my  
>>>> stuff
>>>> published, nobody will take what I'm writing now. Maybe I've just
>>>> become a
>>>> terrible writer after turning 55, or maybe my moment has simply  
>>>> passed.
>>> In
>>>> any case, I figure I'll keep at it until I hit 60 in three years  
>>>> and
>>> unless
>>>> something changes in the reception of my work, I'll turn my full
>>> attention
>>>> to gardening and cooking and leave poetry to others.
>>>>
>>>> jd
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Joseph Duemer
>>>> Professor of Humanities
>>>> Clarkson University
>>>> Weblog: sharpsand.net
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Joseph Duemer
>>> Professor of Humanities
>>> Clarkson University
>>> Weblog: sharpsand.net
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>
> -- 
> Tad Richards
> http://www.opus40.org/tadrichards/
> http://opusforty.blogspot.com/
>
> The moral is this: in American verse,
> The better you are, the pay is worse.
> --Corey Ford

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