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HUMOUR-RESEARCH  March 2008

HUMOUR-RESEARCH March 2008

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Subject:

humor information

From:

andré descheneaux <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Humour-Research <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 6 Mar 2008 14:36:31 -0500

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Use of humor to reduce stress and pain and enhance healing in the dental
setting.
Morse DR
J N J Dent Assoc 2007, 78:32-6
Laughter and humor are not beneficial for everyone, but since there are no
negative side effects, they should be used in the dental setting to help
reduce stress and pain and to improve healing. Here's a parting medical
joke. A bout of stomach trouble had sent a man to the physician. The
physician prescribed plenty of milk and gave the man a bottle of pills.
"I'll stop by this evening and see how you're doing", the physician said.
"In the meantime, drink at least four glasses of milk. Milk is the ticket
for curing your trouble. So drink plenty of it". That evening, the physician
returned, examined the man and told him, "You're much better this evening.
Just be sure you don't drink any milk. Not one glass. It's not for you".
"But, doctor", the man exclaimed, "only this morning you told me that milk
was what I needed and that I should drink four glasses of it". "Well, what
do you know?" the physician replied. "It certainly goes to show that we've
made tremendous progress in medicine since the last time I saw you".

2. Pathological crying caused by high-frequency stimulation in the region of
the caudal internal capsule.
Low HL, Sayer FT, Honey CR
Arch Neurol 2008 Feb, 65:264-6

BACKGROUND: Pathological crying has been rarely reported after deep brain
stimulation. The exact neural substrate is unknown, but it is often assumed
that pathological crying and the pseudobulbar syndrome result from
disturbances of a common neural pathway. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING:
Tertiary referral center for neurosurgery. Patient A 48-year-old woman with
advanced Parkinson disease who received bilateral implantation of deep brain
stimulators in her subthalamic nuclei. RESULTS: Stimulation in the region of
the caudal internal capsule resulted in pathological crying but no other
features of pseudobulbar palsy. CONCLUSIONS: At least 1 of the pathways
controlling crying passes through the region of the caudal internal capsule,
and this pathway is distinct from those involved with laughter and
nonemotional facial movements. Moreover, different stimulation frequencies
may elicit either crying or anxiety but not both.

Emoticons in computer-mediated communication: social motives and social
context.
Derks D, Bos AE, von Grumbkow J
Cyberpsychol Behav 2008 Feb, 11:99-101
ABSTRACT This study investigated the role of emoticons in computer-mediated
communication (CMC). The study consisted of an online questionnaire about
the social motives for emoticon use and an experimental part in which
participants (N = 1,251) had to respond to short Internet chats. In these
chats, the interaction partner (friend vs. stranger) and the valence of the
context (positive vs. negative) were manipulated. Results showed that
emoticons are mostly used to express emotion, to strengthen a message, and
to express humor. Furthermore, more emoticons were used in communication
with friends than in communication with strangers, and more emoticons were
used in a positive context than in a negative context. Participants seem to
use emoticons in a way similar to facial behavior in face-to-face
communication with respect to social context and interaction partner

Genetic and environmental contributions to humor styles: a replication
study.
Vernon PA, Martin RA, Schermer JA, Cherkas LF, Spector TD
Twin Res Hum Genet 2008 Feb, 11:44-7

Abstract One thousand and seventy three pairs of adult monozygotic (MZ)
twins and 895 pairs of same sex adult dizygotic (DZ) twins from the United
Kingdom (UK) completed the Humor Styles Questionnaire: a 32-item measure
which assesses two positive and two negative styles of humor. MZ
correlations were approximately twice as large as DZ correlations for all
four humor styles, and univariate behavioral genetic model fitting indicated
that individual differences in all of them can be accounted for entirely by
genetic and nonshared environmental factors, with heritabilities ranging
from .34 to .49. These results, while perhaps not surprising, are somewhat
at odds with a previous study that we conducted in North America (Vernon et
al., in press) in which genetic factors contributed significantly to
individual differences in the two positive humor styles, but contributed far
less to the two negative styles, variance in which was instead largely due
to shared and nonshared environmental factors. We suggest that differences
between North American and UK citizens in their appreciation of different
kinds of humor may be responsible for the different results obtained in
these two studies.

Laugh and the World Laughs with You: An Attachment Perspective on the
Meaning of Laughter in Psychotherapy
Author: Nelson, JK
Source: Clinical Social Work Journal, 2008, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 41-49

From Disaster to Laughter
Author: Hammerschlag, CA
Source: Caring, 2008, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 62-63


BUDGET HUMOUR
Author: Khullar, KK
Source: Yojana, 2008, no. JAN., pp. 81-83

Humour / Les Francais tels qu'ils sont: 10-8-1539
Author: Collilieux, E
Source: Francais Dans Le Monde, 2008, no. 355, pp. 18

. A book of ideas collected from Medical Hypotheses: Death can be cured by 
Roger Dobson.
Charlton BG
Med Hypotheses 2008 Feb 14, :

A new collection of ideas from Medical Hypotheses by Roger Dobson is 
entitled Death can be cured and 99 other Medical Hypotheses. It consists of 
humorous summaries of Medical Hypotheses articles from the past 30 years. 
The book's humour derives mainly from the subject matter, although sometimes 
also from the 'unconventional' approach of the authors with respect to 
matters such as evidence, argument or inference. Medical Hypotheses has 
generated such a lot of apparently- or actually-bizarre ideas because it 
aims to be open to potentially revolutionary science. The journal's official 
stance is that more harm is done by a failure to publish one idea that might 
have been true, than by publishing a dozen ideas that turn out to be false. 
Bizarre ideas tend to catch attention, and may stimulate a valuable 
response - even when a paper is mostly-wrong. A paper may be flawed but 
still contain the germ of an idea that can be elaborated and developed. The 
journal review process is susceptible to both false positives and false 
negatives. False positives occur when we publish an idea that is wrong; 
false negatives occur when we fail to publish an important idea that is 
right, and a potential scientific breakthrough never happens. False 
positives are more obvious, since the paper will be ignored, refuted, or 
fail to be replicated - and often attracts criticism and controversy. 
Editors may therefore take the more cautious path of avoiding false 
positives more assiduously than false negatives; however, this policy 
progressively favours less-ambitious science. Consequently, in Medical 
Hypotheses the 'set point' of risk is nearer to the false positive end of 
the spectrum than for most journals - and the publication of many 
apparently-bizarre papers is a natural consequence of this policy.

 An observational study of humor use while resolving conflict in dating 
couples
Authors: CAMPBELL, LORNE; MARTIN, ROD A.; WARD, JENNIE R.
Source: Personal Relationships, Volume 15, Number 1, March 2008 , pp. 
41-55(15)
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing

Abstract:
This research focused on whether affiliative and aggressive humor use was 
associated with relationship satisfaction and with greater perceived 
closeness, problem resolution, and emotional distress following a conflict 
discussion task. Ninety-eight dating couples from a large Texas University 
participated in this research. Both partners independently completed 
questionnaires about their relationship perceptions, participated in a 
videotaped conflict resolution task, and then answered some additional 
questions. The results revealed that individuals whose partners used more 
affiliative and less aggressive humor during the discussion were more 
satisfied with their relationship and reported an increase in perceived 
closeness and better problem resolution following the discussion. These 
results highlight the importance of both positive and negative forms of 
humor in the regulation of close relationships.

The purpose and function of humour in health, health care and nursing: a 
narrative review
Authors: McCreaddie, May1; Wiggins, Sally2
Source: Journal of Advanced Nursing, Volume 61, Number 6, March 2008 , pp. 
584-595(12)
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing

Abstract:
mccreaddie m. & wiggins s. (2008) The purpose and function of humour in 
health, health care and nursing: a narrative review. Journal of Advanced 
Nursing61(6), 584-595 Abstract Title.The 
purpose and function of humour in health, health care and nursing: a 
narrative review Aim.This 
paper is a report of a review conducted to identify, critically analyse and 
synthesize the humour literature across a number of fields related to 
health, health care and nursing. Background.The 
humour-health hypothesis suggests that there is a positive link between 
humour and health. Humour has been a focus of much contention and 
deliberation for centuries, with three theories dominating the field: the 
superiority or tendentious theory, the incongruity theory and the relief 
theory. Data sources.A 
comprehensive literature search was carried out in January 2007 using a 
number of databases, keywords, manual recursive searching and journal alerts 
(January 1980-2007) cross-referenced with the bibliographic databases of the 
International Society of Humor Studies. An inclusion and exclusion criterion 
was identified. Review methods.A 
narrative review of evidence- and non-evidence-based papers was conducted, 
using a relevant methodological framework with additional scrutiny of 
secondary data sources in the latter. Humour theories, incorporating 
definition, process and impact constituted a significant part of the 
appraisal process. Results.A 
total of 1630 papers were identified, with 220 fully sourced and 88 included 
in the final review. There is a dearth of humour research within nursing 
yet, ironically, an abundance of non-evidence-based opinion citing 
prerequisites and exclusion zones. Examination of physician-patient 
interaction and the humour-health hypothesis demonstrates that use of humour 
by patients is both challenging and revealing, particularly with regard to 
self-deprecating humour. Conclusion.Nurses 
and nursing should adopt a circumspect and evidenced-based approach to 
humour use in their work.
Keywords: health; health care; humour; laughter; literature review; nursing
Document Type: Research article
DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04548.x
Affiliations: 1: May McCreaddie BA MEd RN Doctoral Candidate/Research 
Associate Nursing Studies, Health in Social Sciences, University of 
Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK 2: Sally Wiggins MA PhD Lecturer Department of 
Psychology, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK

Humor as a Serious Strategy of Nonviolent Resistance to Oppression
Author: Sorensen, Majken Jul1
Source: Peace & Change, Volume 33, Number 2, April 2008 , pp. 167-190(24)
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing

Abstract:
This article explores how humor can be used as one aspect of a strategy of 
nonviolent resistance to oppression and dictatorship. It combines 
sociological and philosophical theories about humor's duality and 
incongruity with theories of nonviolent resistance to oppression in order to 
investigate the links between topics that have previously been considered 
unrelated. Experiences from the Serbian Otpor movement, which used humorous 
actions as a part of its strategy to bring down Slobodan Miloševic from 
power, serve to illustrate the dynamics of humor as a form of resistance. 
Empirical examples and existing theory are combined to make an outline of an 
innovative theory of the functions of humor in nonviolent resistance.
Document Type: Research article
DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0130.2008.00488.x
Affiliations: 1: Coventry University, UK

A behavioral genetic investigation of humor styles and their correlations 
with the Big-5 personality dimensions
Authors: Vernon, PA; Martin, RA; Schermer, JA; Mackie, A
Source: Personality and Individual Differences, 2008, vol. 44, no. 5, pp. 
1116-1125

Humor and Politics
Author: Dmitriev, AV
Source: Russian Social Science Review, 2008, vol. 49, no. 1, pp. 53-89


A Humorous Jesus?
Orality, Structure and Characterisation in Luke 14:15-24, and Beyond
Author: Longenecker, Bruce W.1
Source: Biblical Interpretation: A Journal of Contemporary Approaches, 
Volume 16, Number 2, 2008 , pp. 179-204(26)
Publisher: BRILL

Abstract:
If humour is uncharacteristic of the texts of the early Christian movement, 
sensitivity to rhetorical patterning in oral/aural contexts permits the 
recognition of innocuous sexual humour in one of the parables attributed to 
Jesus. Whether or not the humour originates with Jesus, it is suggestive of 
the way that Jesus was remembered by some of his earliest followers, and 
lays down a guidepost as to how he might profitably be rendered in modern 
portraiture or characterised in modern narrative. To that end, this study 
closes with an assessment of four Jesus novels of the past decade in 
relation to their depiction of Jesus and humour.

Abnormal activity in hypothalamus and amygdala during humour processing in 
human narcolepsy with cataplexy
Authors: Schwartz, S; Ponz, A; Poryazova, R; Werth, E; Boesiger, P; Khatami, 
R; Bassetti, CL
Source: Brain, 2008, vol. 131, no. 2, pp. 514-522

Joking apart Brian Logan wonders if the humour of a new Hayward show could 
ever cross boundaries
Source: New Statesman, 2008, no. 4883, pp. 43 

 
 


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