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HUMOUR-RESEARCH  March 2008

HUMOUR-RESEARCH March 2008

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Subject:

Humor information

From:

andré descheneaux <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Humour-Research <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 26 Mar 2008 09:52:13 -0400

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Laughter and tears in the Great War: the need for laughter/the guilt of 
humour.
LeNaour JY
J Eur Stud 2001, 31:265-75



 Humor and Laughter May Influence Health: III. Laughter and Health 
Outcomes.
Bennett MP, Lengacher C
Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2008 Mar, 5:37-40
[ PubMed ] [ Related articles ]
This is part three of a four-part series reviewing the evidence on how humor 
influences physiological and psychological well-being. The first article 
included basic background information, definitions and a review of the 
theoretical underpinnings for this area of research. The second article 
discussed use of humor as a complementary therapy within various clinical 
samples, as well as evidence concerning how a sense of humor influences 
physiological and psychological wellbeing. This third article examines how 
laughter influences health outcomes; including muscle tension, 
cardio-respiratory functioning and various stress physiology measures.



 Cataplexy features in childhood narcolepsy.
Serra L, Montagna P, Mignot E, Lugaresi E, Plazzi G
Mov Disord 2008 Feb 28, :

Cataplexy, the hallmark of narcolepsy, has been well characterized in adults 
but not in children. This study systematically used structured clinical 
assessments and video-recordings (49 episodes in eight cases) to evaluate 
cataplexy in 23 patients diagnosed before the age of 18 years. Forty-three 
percent of patients had falls as part of their attacks. During cataplexy 
knees, head, and jaw were the most frequently compromised body segments; 
eyelids, arms, and trunk being less commonly involved. More rarely, blurred 
vision, slurred speech, irregular breathing, or a sudden loss of smiling 
mimics were reported. One-third of the sample presented with a previously 
unrecognized description of cataplexy that we coined "cataplectic facies," 
consisting of a state of semipermanent eyelid and jaw weakness, on which 
partial or complete cataplectic attacks were superimposed. The usual 
triggering emotions, such as laughter, joking, or anger, were not always 
present, especially when close to an abrupt onset, hampering diagnosis. 
Video-recordings of cataplectic attacks may be useful to document the 
attack, allowing a comparison with archived presentations. (c) 2008 Movement 
Disorder Society.


 The purpose and function of humour in health, health care and nursing: a 
narrative review.
McCreaddie M, Wiggins S
J Adv Nurs 2008 Mar, 61:584-95

AIM: This paper is a report of a review conducted to identify, critically 
analyse and synthesize the humour literature across a number of fields 
related to health, health care and nursing. BACKGROUND: The humour-health 
hypothesis suggests that there is a positive link between humour and health. 
Humour has been a focus of much contention and deliberation for centuries, 
with three theories dominating the field: the superiority or tendentious 
theory, the incongruity theory and the relief theory. DATA SOURCES: A 
comprehensive literature search was carried out in January 2007 using a 
number of databases, keywords, manual recursive searching and journal alerts 
(January 1980-2007) cross-referenced with the bibliographic databases of the 
International Society of Humor Studies. An inclusion and exclusion criterion 
was identified. REVIEW METHODS: A narrative review of evidence- and 
non-evidence-based papers was conducted, using a relevant methodological 
framework with additional scrutiny of secondary data sources in the latter. 
Humour theories, incorporating definition, process and impact constituted a 
significant part of the appraisal process. RESULTS: A total of 1630 papers 
were identified, with 220 fully sourced and 88 included in the final review. 
There is a dearth of humour research within nursing yet, ironically, an 
abundance of non-evidence-based opinion citing prerequisites and exclusion 
zones. Examination of physician-patient interaction and the humour-health 
hypothesis demonstrates that use of humour by patients is both challenging 
and revealing, particularly with regard to self-deprecating humour. 
CONCLUSION: Nurses and nursing should adopt a circumspect and 
evidenced-based approach to humour use in their work.


[Medical clowns at hospitals and their effect on hospitalized children]
Bornstein Y
Harefuah 2008 Jan, 147:30-2, 95, 94

Healing by the use of humor has become popular over the last few years and 
it is used not only in alternative medicine but also in conventional 
medicine in hospitals all over the world, particularly in the USA and 
Europe. This practice has been well implemented in pediatric wards. It is 
easier to make a child laugh than an adult. In the framework of healing by 
humor, use is made of a medical clown who is in fact a person who has 
undergone special training in acting and clowning, combined with medical 
knowledge and an understanding of patient behavior. Some medical clowns come 
from the world of entertainment, and are actors, clowns, and magicians. Some 
have a paramedical or medical background. Medical research demonstrates that 
medical clowns and humor have a positive effect on patients. The 
implementation of medical clowning has been increasing throughout the world 
from year to year and has, slowly but surely, started a movement to 
integrate it into formal frameworks in both pediatric and adult wards in 
hospitals. However, there is still a necessity to conduct larger, well 
controlled clinical trials regarding the influence of the different 
programs. Maybe the growing awareness in the world will fill the void that 
demands resources of both personnel and budgets, both of which are often 
missing from health budgets.


Writing, Cognitive Borderlines and the Sense of Belonging in Doris Lessing's 
African Laughter and Dan Jacobson's The Electronic Elephant
Author: McAllister, John
Source: Matatu - Journal for African Culture and Society, Volume 34: 
Zimbabwean Transitions: Essays on Zimbabwean Literature in English, Ndebele 
and Shona. Edited by Mbongeni Z. Malaba and Geoffrey V. Davis , pp. 
25-38(14)

Abstract:
This essay explores the contradiction between knowing and 'mastering' in 
colonial discourse by focusing on two accounts of travel in southern Africa 
in the 1980 s and 1990 s by "white Africans" returning home after long 
periods of exile. Doris Lessing's African Laughter: Four Visits to Zimbabwe 
(1992) and Dan Jacobson's The Electronic Elephant: A Southern African 
Journey (1994) both attempt to address the ways in which Northern travel 
writing about Africa has been implicated in this contradiction. Lessing. 
more radically, disrupts the conventional linearity of African travelogue, 
undermining the distancing, commanding gaze of most (post)colonial travel 
writing. Jacobson ironizes his postcolonial journey by placing it in the 
context of colonial journeys along the same route, but otherwise largely 
reproduces the continuous, 'objective' narrative of colonial travel writing. 
The reductiveness and arrogance of most colonial travel writing is built 
into this structure. Thus Jacobson cannot entirely escape the alienating 
perspective of colonial discourse and its modern incarnations (Mary Louise 
Pratt's "Third Worldism"); Lessing's deconstructive approach is more 
successful but at some cost to the conventional pleasures readers expect 
from travel literature. As white Africans returning to former homes being 
transformed by African rule, both Lessing and Jacobson are fascinated with 
the dilemmas faced by the former colonial settler community. Both have to 
listen repeatedly.

 Infinite Possibility: Clowning With Elderly People
Author: Clare McMahan, Selena
Source: Care Management Journals, Volume 9, Number 1, 2008 , pp. 19-24(6)
Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

Abstract:
Over the past 30 years, there has been a plentitude of research into the 
health benefits of humor and laughter for healthy, sick, or depressed adults 
and children as well as for senior citizens. Medical research supports our 
human instinct that people who smile and laugh are happy, whereas those who 
are inexpressive are usually not happy. Research shows that humor stimulus 
results in mirth, which elicits a primarily emotional response with 
psychological effects, and laughter, which elicits a physical response with 
physiological effects. The many physiological benefits of laughter in older 
adults have been clearly demonstrated. Yet much of the medical research is 
based on experiments using funny videos and cartoons for humor sessions. I 
argue that "clowning around" with elderly people brings greater benefits 
than laughter alone. These benefits are clearly evident, though they may not 
be scientifically measurable: When the game is rooted in the patient's own 
imagination, thereby giving agency to a powerless individual, it is many 
times more personal and transformative. In this article, I focus on my 
experiences with older adults while working with Clowns Without Borders and 
Risaterapia as well as on my own relationship with my grandfather. I provide 
a framework for why humanitarian clowning and the principles behind it can 
be incredibly well suited for working with the elderly.


 Western Yiddish yontev-bletlekh: Facing Modernity with Humor
Author: Aptroot, Marion
Source: Jewish Studies Quarterly, Volume 15, Number 1, March 2008 , pp. 
47-67(21)
Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

Executive Function, Mentalizing and Humor in Major Depression
Authors: Uekermann, J; Channon, S; Lehmkamper, C; AbdelHamid, M; 
Vollmoeller, W; Daum, I
Source: Journal- International Neuropsychological Society, 2008, vol. 14, 
no. 1, pp. 55-62

Comic Liberation: The Feminist Face of Humor in Contemporary Art
Author: Klein, SR
Source: Art Education, 2008, vol. 61, no. 2, pp. 47-52

Assessing Students' Perceptions of Inappropriate and Appropriate Teacher 
Humor
Authors: Frymier, AB; Wanzer, MB; Wojtaszczyk, A
Source: Communication Education, 2008, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 266-288

From critical care to comfort care: the sustaining value of humour
Authors: Dean, Ruth Anne Kinsman; Major, Joanne E
Source: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Volume 17, Number 8, April 2008 , pp. 
1088-1095(8)
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing

What's so funny? Humour and contemporary art
Author: Dezeuze, A
Source: Art Monthly, 2008, no. 314, pp. 9-21

Attachment styles, conflict styles and humour styles: interrelationships and 
associations with relationship satisfaction
Authors: Cann, A; Norman, MA; Welbourne, JL; Calhoun, LG
Source: European Journal of Personality, 2008, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 131-146 

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