JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for PHD-DESIGN Archives


PHD-DESIGN Archives

PHD-DESIGN Archives


PHD-DESIGN@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

PHD-DESIGN Home

PHD-DESIGN Home

PHD-DESIGN  December 2007

PHD-DESIGN December 2007

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: Design Research?

From:

Terence <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Terence <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 18 Dec 2007 15:17:44 +0900

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (240 lines)

Dear Paul,

You ask 'Just where is design research going?'. It is perhaps worth
considering it in terms of time-lines and trajectories of development of
different areas of design research.

Design research has been advancing in radically different timeframes in
different areas. Design areas are also dependent on each other in complex
ways. This has been relatively hidden unless you research across design
areas.

Typically, communities of researchers and practitioners in particular areas
of design have to date been extremely  parochial. As a result there has been
little awareness of the advances in design research overall and a relative
weakness in the field's development. This adverse situation has been
reinforced by the defensiveness that comes with parochialism. Many designers
and are upset and defensive when they hear of advances in other design areas
that go beyond their own.

Some broad brush characteristics of the development of design research over
the last 50 years:

1. Productivity of design activity and manufacturing, and  has been
massively improved as result of design research - mainly and initially in
the areas of engineering and business system design.
   * Times to market are around 1/4 of what they were
   * Business productivity is up
   * Time lag between events and business feedback is around 1/4 of values
in the 1950s
   * Graphics and industrial design teams only require around 1/4 of the
staff
   * Output quality of designed products systems, services, documents and
organisations has improved
   * Design research has meant that current designers do not have to be so
skilled or creative

2. Some areas of design have been able to piggy back on earlier research.
For example:
   * Graphic design software (Quark, Adobe etc) has emerged from early
design research to improve business systems productivity and engineering
design outcomes.
   * Industrial design and web design has built on early work in ergonomics
research and research into collaborative multi-discipline design teams 
   * Engineering design has benefited from the Art and Design research focus
on human issues relating to meaning and it's drawing and reformulating
philosophical analyses of  Saussure, Pierce, Dewey,  Husserl,  etc.

3. Much design research (and design) is marching order work, E.g. :
  * Much of the near future of mechatronics design can be guessed at because
it is a filling out of a design territory
  * Much of Corporate image design can be similarly predicted
  * Much of Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 design and design research can be predicted
as it is effectively defined by XML.

4. Most areas of design research have a deep dependence on the systems
research field:
  * Design research in the areas of control systems underpins most complex
design work
  * Systems research relating to social systems offers considerable benefits
for design research into designing of complex systems involving people.
Mostly this is seen with hindsight where designers and design researchers
produce faulty designs because they haven't used this material.
  * Organization design research builds directly on systems research for
example of Deming and Senge
  * Environmental design, design research in relation to ecology and saving
the world are tightly coupled to systems research. For example, the classic
book 'Limits to Growth' that identified that resources were finite derived
from a large systems dynamics model.

Where design research is going to depends on where you are standing, how
much of it you see and whether you are at the sharp end or somewhere further
back. The differences are significant.

An example, many design schools are teaching web 2.0 and interactive media
design as a relatively new professional skill. A year ago, I was at a
Digital Ecosystems conference in which delegates and presenters viewed Web
3.0 as already 'old hat'. It is. The working group designing its  core
technology, RDF, completed their business in 2004. Service Oriented
Architectures (SOAs) Potentially, RDF will radically change how we view the
web and the distribution of power and, hopefully, relegate XML and Xhtml
back to their original roles as page description languages. The sharp end of
design research is in front of RDF and designing the kinds of world that is
possible.

Similar differences can be found in most areas of design research, Health
springs to mind.

Where is design research going? Very fast into unknown territories in some
cases. Nowhere in others.

Thoughts?

Terry





-----Original Message-----
From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related
research in Design [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Rodgers,
Paul
Sent: Friday, 14 December 2007 7:40 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Design Research?

Dear List Members,

 

Apologies for cross posting.

 

I am currently writing a short article for New Design magazine
(http://www.newdesignmagazine.co.uk/index.html) on the subject of design
research.

 

I would like to canvas opinions from list members on this subject. I would
obviously like to include these opinions in the article but I am also happy
to make them anonymous if you wish.

 

On the subject of design research in general and design conferences in
particular, Professor David Durling has recently stated: 

 

"Though peer review and presentation of good and interesting papers is a
prerequisite for me, the real enjoyment of conferences is meeting people,
debating, and making contacts."

DESIGN RESEARCH NEWS Volume 12 Number 11 November 2007 ISSN 1473-3862, DRS
Digital Newsletter

 

Having attended and presented at 3 design conferences since August 2007 I am
wondering where we, as design researchers, are going as a discipline. It is
always good, as David Durling has stated, to meet old and new contacts and
discuss ideas, share interests and so on.

 

However, are we really developing new forms of knowledge and understanding
in the field? Do we give ourselves enough time to write, present, listen,
think, interpret, reflect and engage with other researchers in this frantic
world of design conference after design conference? 

 

Perhaps the following questions (and you may have your own) might stimulate
some discussion:

 

Just where is design research going?

 

Does design research help (for practitioners, educators, other researchers)?

 

Are standards being upheld in design research?

 

Are there too many design conferences? Or simply not enough?

 

Does design research help you in your work? If so how?

 

What are the questions we as design researchers should be addressing or
investigating in the near future?

 

I appreciate any opinions on this subject and look forward to receiving your
replies.

 

Best regards,

 

Paul

 

 

Dr Paul A. Rodgers

Reader in Design

School of Creative Industries

Napier University

Merchiston Campus

10 Colinton Road

Edinburgh

EH10 5DT

Scotland 

UK

t: 00 44 (0)131 455 2313/2678

f: 00 44 (0)131 455 2292

e: [log in to unmask]

w: http://www.napier.ac.uk/sci

 



This message is intended for the addressee(s) only and should not be read,
copied or disclosed to anyone else outwith the University without the
permission of the sender.
It is your responsibility to ensure that this message and any attachments
are scanned for viruses or other defects. Napier University does not accept
liability for any loss or damage which may result from this email or any
attachment, or for errors or omissions arising after it was sent. Email is
not a secure medium. Email entering the University's system is subject to
routine monitoring and filtering by the University. 

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JISCMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998


WWW.JISCMAIL.AC.UK

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager