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ARCHAEOBOTANY  November 2007

ARCHAEOBOTANY November 2007

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Subject:

Re: Aldona Bieniek email

From:

Felix Bittmann <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Thu, 1 Nov 2007 13:47:37 +0100

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Aylen Capparelli schrieb:
> Dear list members,
> I am trying to send Aldona the MS for the 14th IWGP Proceedings but I 
> failed all the times. All the emails are coming back to me. Have you 
> got any of you the same problem? I don't know how to communicate with her.
> Thank you for your answer
> Aylen Capparelli
>
>     ----- Original Message -----
>     *From:* Stefanie Jacomet <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>     *To:* [log in to unmask]
>     <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>     *Sent:* Monday, October 29, 2007 3:20 AM
>     *Subject:* AW: cess pit mineralised material
>
>     Hallo to all,
>
>     there is plenty of literature about such mineralised stuff from
>     latrines from central Europe, although a lot in german (or
>     French), but there is also stuff in English. Wendy Carruthers did
>     a lot, the first in the 70ies was F. Green (a Naomi already told
>     you). We find such layers e.g. on the bottom of pits in Roman
>     legionary camps (or other Roman settlements) as well as in the
>     middle ages (many of them in towns). I attach here some citations,
>     I tried to be es anglish as possible. Concerning animal remains
>     (small animals) see Hüster-Plogamann et al. 2006. In Jacomet 2003
>     (unfortunately in German) I tried to compile the current
>     literature. Hope this helps! Stefanie
>
>     Bakels, C. C. und Dijkman, W. (2000) Maastricht in the first
>     millenium AD. The archaeobotanical evidence. Archaeologia Mosana
>     2, 78.
>
>     Carruthers, W. (1986) The Late Bronze Age Midden at Potterne.
>     Circea 4/1, 16-17.
>
>     Carruthers, W. (1991) Mineralised Plant Remains: Some Examples
>     from Sites in Southern England. In: Palaeoethnobotany and
>     Archaeology. International Work-Group for Palaeoethnobotany 8th
>     Symposium Nitra-Nové Vozokany 1989. In: Hajnalova, E. (Hrsg.)
>     Palaeoethnobotany and Archaeology. International Work-Group for
>     Palaeoethnobotany 8th Symposium Nitra-Nové Vozokany 1989. ACTA 7.
>     Nitra,* *75-80.
>
>     Carruthers, W. (2000) Mineralised plant remains. In: Lawson, A. J.
>     (Hrsg.) Potterne 1982-5: Animal husbandry in later prehistoric
>     Wiltshire. Wessey Archaeology Report 17,* *72-84.
>
>     Ciaraldi, M. (2000) Drug preparation in evidence? An unusual plant
>     and bone assemblage from the Pompeian countryside, Italy.
>     Vegetation History and Archaeobotany 9/2, 91-98.
>
>     Dickson, C. (1989) Human coprolites. In: Bell, B. und Dickson, C.
>     (Hrsg.) Excavations at Warebeth (Stromness Cemetery) Broch,
>     Orkney. Proc Soc Antiq Scot 119,* *115-131.
>
>     Green, F. J. (1979a) Botanical Remains. In: J.S.F. Walker (ed.),
>     Excavations in Medieval Tenements on the Quilter's Valut Site in
>     Southampton. In: Walker, J. S. F. (Hrsg.) Excavations in Medieval
>     Tenements on the Quilter's Valut Site in Southampton. Proc. Hants.
>     Field Club Archaeol. Soc. 35,* *183.
>
>     Green, F. J. (1979b) Collection and Interpretation of Botanical
>     Information from medieval Urban Excavations in Southern England.
>     In: Körber-Grohne, U. (Hrsg.) Festschrift Maria Hopf zum 65.
>     Geburtstag am 14. September 1979. Archaeo-Physika 8. Köln,* *39-55.
>
>     Green, F. J. (1979c) Phosphatic mineralization of seeds from
>     archaeological sites. Journal of Archaeological Science 6, 279-284.
>
>     Hellwig, M. (1997) Plant remains from two cesspits (15th and 16th
>     century) and a pond (13th century) from Göttingen, southern Lower
>     Saxony, Germany. Vegetation History and Archaeoabotany 6/2, 105-116.
>
>     Hüster-Plogmann, H., Jacomet, S. und Hagendorn, A. (2006)
>     Unspecified early Roman pits: an Interdisciplinary Excursion to
>     Identify the Use of Pits in Vindonissa (Windisch), Switzerland.
>     In: Maltby, M. (Hrsg.) Integrating Zooarchaeology. Proceedings ot
>     the 9th Conferece of the International Council of Archaeozoology,
>     Durham, August 2002 Oxford,* *92-97.
>
>     Hüster-Plogmann, H., Jacomet, S., Klee, M., Müller, U. und Vogel
>     Müller, V. (2003) Ein stilles Örtchen. Zur Latrinengrube in Feld
>     6, Grabung TOP-Haus AG, Kaiseraugst (2001.01). Jahresberichte aus
>     Augst und Kaiseraugst 24, 159-191.
>
>     Jacomet, S. (2003) Und zum Dessert Granatapfel - Ergebnisse der
>     archäobotanischen Untersuchungen. In: Hagendorn, A., Doppler, H.
>     W., Huber, A., Hüster-Plogmann, H., Jacomet, S., Meyer-Freuler,
>     C., Pfäffli, B. und Schibler, J. (Hrsg.) Zur Frühzeit von
>     Vindonissa. Auswertung der Holzbauten der Grabung Windisch-Breite
>     1996-1998. Veröffentlichungen der Gesellschaft Pro Vindonissa 18.
>     Brugg,* *48-79; 173-229; 482-492.
>
>     Kenward, H. und Hall, A. (2000) Decay of delicate organic remains
>     in shallow urban deposits: are we at a watershed? Antquity 74,
>     519-525.
>
>     Stika, H.-P. (1997) Pflanzenreste aus dem archaischen Milet.
>     Vorbericht zur Kampagne 1992. Archäologischer Anzeiger 2, 157-163.
>
>     Prof. Dr. Stefanie Jacomet
>
>     IPNA / IPAS
>
>     Institute of Prehistory and Archaeological Science
>
>     Dept. of Environmental Sciences
>
>     Basel University
>
>     Spalenring 145
>
>     CH-4055 Basel
>
>     http://pages.unibas.ch/arch/
>
>     [log in to unmask]
>
>     +41 61 201 02 11
>
>     private:
>
>     Dorfstrasse 50
>
>     CH-4452 Itingen
>
>     Switzerland
>
>     mobile +41 79 322 39 17
>
>     -----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
>     *Von:* The archaeobotany mailing list
>     [mailto:[log in to unmask]] *Im Auftrag von *Sarpaki Anaya
>     *Gesendet:* Sonntag, 28. Oktober 2007 19:48
>     *An:* [log in to unmask]
>     *Betreff:* Re: cess pit mineralised material
>
>     Naomi hello and anyone out there,
>
>     Yes, there is a possibility that this material could be from
>     incompletely digested food....although I do not know how one could
>     define this!! I have no idea of anyone having done experiments
>     such as archaeozoologists have done!! Yet, what makes me think it
>     is partly digested is the shape of legumes..some of which seem to
>     have been "bitten"....also seeds which seem like fig seeds have
>     concretions around looking like mineralised flesh (?)....
>
>     Regarding the rodents..yes, I seem to have a few bones...maybe
>     some individuals...I wonder whether "methane" which would exist in
>     these sewares would get the rodents "high" to a point to loose
>     consciousness!!...and drown...
>
>     Thank you for Green's ref. I also traced another ref. Pelling,
>     R.2000a The charred and mineralised plant remains.In B.M.Charles,
>     et al., A bronze Age ditch and Iron Age Settlement at Elms Farm,
>     Humberstore, Licester. Trasactions of Leicestershire Arch.Hist.
>     Society 74: 207-213. I cannot trace it here in Crete so if the
>     author or anyone else who has access to a full pdf. has it I would
>     be very grateful.
>
>     It is fun....from burnt dung to human dung.....!!
>
>     Thank you for the response,
>
>     Anaya
>
>         ----- Original Message -----
>
>         *From:* Naomi Miller <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>
>         *To:* The archaeobotany mailing list
>         <mailto:[log in to unmask]> ; Sarpaki Anaya
>         <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>
>         *Sent:* Sunday, October 28, 2007 7:07 PM
>
>         *Subject:* Re: cess pit mineralised material
>
>         Hello, Anaya and everyone else,
>
>         Is there any possiblity that the material is from incompletely
>         digested food?
>
>         Basis for this suggestion:
>
>         My favorite deposit ever had lots of mineralized seeds from a
>         straight-sided pit that had a diameter of about 1 meter, was
>         several meters deep (like a well), the soil had a greenish
>         hue. There were hundreds of mineralized grape seeds, many
>         identifiable wheat and barley bits (also mineralized, looking
>         partly 'digested'), perfectly preserved rodent bones
>         representing entire skeletons (including delicate skulls
>         floating to the top of the flot. tank), and a high
>         concentration of smooth pebbles that easily fit in a hand.
>
>         The explanation was latrine (form; chemistry [see Green 1979];
>         grape seeds–in one end out the other; wheat and barley–perhaps
>         eaten as groats; drowned rodents (like the LaBrea tarpit–once
>         they fell in, no other animal was able to fish them out). As
>         for the stones, though he refused to be credited for the idea,
>         my diss. advisor suggested use as ancient 'toilet paper'.
>
>         ref.: Economy and Environment at Malyan, a Third Millennium
>         B.C. Urban Center in Southern Iran (1982). Ph.D. diss., U of
>         Michigan, Ann Arbor, pp. 363-364 and data tables.
>
>         I alluded to this deposit in /Bulletin on Sumerian
>         Agriculture/ 1:45-47 (1984), "The Interpretation of Some
>         Carbonized Cereal Remains as Remnants of Dung Cake Fuel." It
>         was interesting that the proportion of wheat to barley in the
>         latrine deposit was exactly opposite of the charred remains
>         (reasonable interpretation: remains of human food vs. burned dung)
>
>         See also:
>
>         Green, Francis
>
>         1979 Phosphatic Mineralization of Seeds from Archaeological
>         Sites. /Journal of Archaeological Science/ 6:279-284.
>
>         toodle-oo. Naomi
>
>         On Oct 26, 2007, at 12:24 PM, Sarpaki Anaya wrote:
>
>
>
>         I am looking at few samples from a Minoan sewage at the site
>         of Malia in Crete and I am quite baffled by what I
>         see......what seems to me to be mineralised seeds, such as
>         grape etc. However, legume seeds seem to also have been
>         mineralised and also fragments of "pods". As my experience is
>         with charred material I find quite difficult to "decipher"
>         these forms. I would therefore appreciate to have any
>         references which might help me with these. If anybody is
>         working on cess pits/sewage mineralised material or has
>         published on these, I would very much appreciate to have their
>         contact address and/or references.
>
>         Thank you for all the help,
>
>         Anaya
>
>         _____________
>
>         Dr Anaya.Sarpaki
>         Independent scholar
>         137 Tsikalaria,
>         73200 Souda - Chania, Crete.
>         Tel: +30 28210 81641
>         Fax: +30 28210 28452
>         [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>
>
>
>         -------------------------------------
>
>         Naomi F. Miller
>
>         University of Pennsylvania Museum
>
>         MASCA-Museum Applied Science Center for Archaeology
>
>         3260 South Street
>
>         Philadelphia, PA 19104
>
>         --------------------------------------
>
>         tel: (215) 898 4075; FAX: (215) 898-0657
>
>         www: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~nmiller0/
>         <http://www.sas.upenn.edu/%7Enmiller0/>
>
>
>
>         ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>         No virus found in this incoming message.
>         Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>         Version: 7.5.503 / Virus Database: 269.15.12/1096 - Release
>         Date: 27/10/2007 11:02 pl
>
Dear Aylen,

the address is [log in to unmask]

cheers,
Felix

-- 
Dr. Felix Bittmann
Niedersaechsisches Institut für historische Kuestenforschung
Viktoriastr. 26/28
D-26382 Wilhelmshaven

Tel +49 (0)4421 915 146
Fax +49 (0)4421 915 110
e-mail [log in to unmask]
http://www.nihk.de

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