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BRITARCH  September 2007

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Subject:

Re: NEWS RELEASE: The oldest Roman f rontier system produces another twist in Scot l and’s history

From:

Peter Green <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

British archaeology discussion list <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Mon, 3 Sep 2007 16:52:36 +0100

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Wonderful idea Mark, but doesn't look as if you've got any support...  
8-)

Peter Green
Webmaster

The Roman Gask
Email: [log in to unmask]
Web site: http://www.theromangaskproject.org.uk


On 3 Sep 2007, at 11:31, Mark Horton wrote:

> Can we now see the Gask included in the World Heritage site  
> extension that includes the Antonine wall! Of course it should have  
> been there is the first place as the first Roman frontier!
>
> Mark
>
>
> On 1 Sep 2007, at 11:24, Peter Green wrote:
>
>> NEWS RELEASE  FROM THE ROMAN GASK PROJECT
>> 1 September 2007
>>
>> The oldest Roman frontier system produces another twist in  
>> Scotland’s history
>>
>>
>> Archaeologists working on Scotland’s  Gask Ridge Frontier, which  
>> dates to the early 70s AD, have discovered evidence that part of  
>> the visible monument is in fact 70 years younger than previously  
>> believed and dates from the Antonine period. The Gask frontier is  
>> the oldest Roman frontier anywhere in the Empire and predates  
>> Hadrian’s Wall by 50 years
>>
>> The Gask Ridge Frontier is a combination of forts, watch towers  
>> and a road. It stretches from around Dunblane in Perthshire to  
>> north of Perth itself, mainly running on the low Gask Ridge.  Work  
>> this summer, by the Roman Gask Project, University of Liverpool,  
>> indicates that the visible Roman  road is younger than the watch  
>> towers that are arranged along it. The towers date from around 70  
>> AD and would have been linked by a road or track, however the  
>> visble road is Antonine in date (around 140 AD).
>>
>> During the Antonine period Hadrian’s Wall was abandoned and a new  
>> frontier of wood and turf – the Antonine Wall – was built between  
>> the Clyde and Forth. At the same time some of the forts that made  
>> up the Gask system were rebuilt as outposts of the Antonine Wall.
>>
>> “The archaeology of the Gask is becoming more complex than  
>> originally believed and shows that it played an active part in the  
>> military history of Roman Scotland for a considerable time,” said  
>> Dr David Woolliscroft co–Director of the project.
>>
>> “The watch towers must have been linked by a road or track, to  
>> allow the tower teams to reach their posts from the nearby forts,  
>> but that road remains to be found. The wonderfully engineered road  
>> we see today was built later when the forts came back into use in  
>> the mid 2nd century.”
>>
>> The combination of road and watch towers that was first created in  
>> Scotland was used as a model by the Roman army in Germany 20 years  
>> later when they built their frontier from the Rhine to the Danube.
>>
>> Notes for editors
>> 1. Press enquiries to Peter Green,  
>> [log in to unmask] or 44 (0) 7866 727141.
>>
>> 2. The Roman Gask Project
>> The Roman Gask Project is a long term programme to study the Roman  
>> Frontier works on and around the Gask Ridge in Perthshire,  
>> Scotland. The Gask Ridge frontier system is the earliest Roman  
>> land frontier in Britain, built in the 70s 50 years before  
>> Hadrian's Wall and 70 years before the Antonine Wall.
>>
>> Since German archaeologists have now re-dated the start of their  
>> frontier (which was once thought also to belong to the 80's) to  
>> the Trajanic period 15-20 years later, it now seems that the Gask  
>> system is the first Roman land frontier anywhere.
>>
>> As such, the Gask acquires a particular importance, because it is  
>> difficult to judge how Roman frontiers changed and developed over  
>> time unless one can study the prototype.
>>
>> http://www.theromangaskproject.org.uk/
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Peter Green
>> Webmaster
>>
>> The Roman Gask
>> Email: [log in to unmask]
>> Web site: http://www.theromangaskproject.org.uk

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