JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for PHD-DESIGN Archives


PHD-DESIGN Archives

PHD-DESIGN Archives


PHD-DESIGN@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

PHD-DESIGN Home

PHD-DESIGN Home

PHD-DESIGN  February 2007

PHD-DESIGN February 2007

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: Beauty - a mathematical aesthetic

From:

Klaus Krippendorff <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Klaus Krippendorff <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Tue, 6 Feb 2007 22:46:37 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (79 lines)

anton,
your characterization of chess as a simple game that can be reduced to
processing is too simplistic.  if it could be reduced to computing all
alternative moves than we would have found a solution in the form of a
sequence of countermoves that unfailingly leads to winning the game
(depending on who starts).  the fact is that the game is transcomputational.
its winning strategy cannot be computed if you put all computers together
and let them cooperate for as long as the earth solidified.  this is why
being beaten by deep blue is not so obvious.
klaus  

-----Original Message-----
From: PhD-Design - This list is for discussion of PhD studies and related
research in Design [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of A Hutton
Sent: Tuesday, February 06, 2007 10:52 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Beauty - a mathematical aesthetic

Ranulph

When deep blue beat kasparov there was a gasp and then an explaination which
seeks to minimise to achievement. Computers are good processors, chess is a
simple game it can be reduced to processing, of course computers will win.

In a smiliar way here you have with regard to this beauty project mimimised
the achivement ("geeky and trivial").

As computer programs model or partially model aspects of human thinking
(computational creativity, understanding of beauty, etc, etc) they make a
contribution to the overall project of Artificial Intelligence.


anton


-----Original Message-----
From: Ranulph Glanville <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Date: Mon, 5 Feb 2007 23:33:41 +0000
Subject: Re: Beauty - a mathematical aesthetic

Yes, this research tells us that we can model something, based on simplified
determinations of the averaged decision of a collection of humans, that will
allow us to change images of faces so that the better match the model built.
That means precisely that all the beauty (if that's what it is) is in the
eyes of the (collective of) beholders. It also means the outcome is not
aesthetic but the outcome of a crude psychological sampling technique. Is
this beauty? It's certainly not aesthetics.

Of course, tricks like this are fascinating and create possibilities we'd
not previously had. But understanding? I don't think there's much there:
it's sort of geeky and trivial, but with the usual inflation of the computer
world, and the usual blindness of the mechanist to what designers actually
do.

Reminds me a bit of a charming mathematician who told me that Hundertwasser
was the only decent architect: he wasn't prepared to listen when I explained
that what Hundertwasser does is about as far removed from architecture as
anything I can imagine.

Goodnight, my beauties!

Ranulph


Anthony Hutton
Senior Lecturer in Design
School of Creative Arts
Magee College
University of Ulster
Rock Road
Derry City
BT48 7JL
Mobile +44  (0)7813 780316
http://www.ulst.ac.uk/staff/a.hutton.html
[log in to unmask]
Web site:
www.foylearts.net/ahutton/mobile

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager