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BRITARCH  July 2006

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Subject:

Re: Mining landscape of Cornwall and West Devon becomes a UNESCO World Heritage Site

From:

Bea Hopkinson <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

British archaeology discussion list <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 14 Jul 2006 08:10:52 -0700

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text/plain

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Trevor,

     There is also in the field of metal extraction the widespread use of 
lead which
we can certainly trace at Droitwich where it was used in boiling pan 
construction,  to at least 1086 in Domesday Book (as fabrica plumbi) .   
There are also indications from the design of Anglo Saxon furnaces and 
furnace evidence that such pans were likely to have been used at least 
from that earlier time.

Bea

>I couldn't agree more Bea.
>
>It is interesting to note that the new heritage site includes West Devon for
>the part it played in tin and copper extraction. Here in North Devon we have
>silver/lead mines, certainly documented from the 12th century and more and
>more evidence suggests a much earlier mining field.
>
>Then we have the Roman extraction of iron and huge smelting complexes around
>Brayford in North Devon, and I do not believe that we have scratched the
>surface of the extent of the mining and smelting field in that area.
>
>I can only think that 'poor man country Cornwall' who have received millions
>from Brussels as being a 'poor economy' have the knowledge and will to
>'push' such enterprises. Everyone knows that Cornwall was very late in its
>mineral extraction, compared for example with Devon. The majority of the
>early tin exports (pre history) came from Devon and not from Cornwall. I can
>only think that it is our 'honest' Englishness which lets us down!
>
>Best of luck to them anyway.
>
>Trevor.
>
>----- Original Message ----- 
>From: "Bea Hopkinson" <[log in to unmask]>
>To: <[log in to unmask]>
>Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2006 7:26 PM
>Subject: Re: [BRITARCH] Mining landscape of Cornwall and West Devon becomes 
>a UNESCO World Heritage Site
>
>
>> Re the note below on the
>>> inclusion in the World Heritage List is essentially honorific and
>>>leaves the existing rights and obligations of owners, occupiers and
>>>planning authorities unaffected. A prerequisite for World Heritage Site
>>>status is, nevertheless, the existence of effective legal protection and
>>>the establishment of management plans agreed with site owners to ensure
>>>each site's conservation and presentation.
>>
>> It is very heartening to see such worthwhile sites listed as World
>> Heritage Sites
>> in the United Kingdom.  One can't help but wonder though how sites are
>> chosen.
>> For a long time I have felt strongly about the Droitwich Brine Springs
>> where we
>> have physical evidence of a wooden structure - 30 ft. deep built around
>> these springs
>> which replaced in 1264 an early structure that can be traced as early as
>> 816 A.D.
>> At this site there are Iron Age remains, Roman remains, Anglo Saxon
>> remains as well as later remains from the 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th
>> centuries.  The site is maintained by the
>> local borough and county councils who were discouraged in the 1980's from
>> re-routing the Brindley Canal which was built to transport salt - another
>> heritage item at this site.
>> The brine itself in the principal pit, known as Upwich, is also unique in
>> that this naturally fully saturated sodium chloride brine is very pure
>> containing only minimal trace element amounts of other minerals.  This is
>> very unusual for natural water sources.  In addition these sub-artesian
>> brine springs come to the surface without the need for deep digging
>> without being diluted by fresh-water close to the surface.  For that
>> reason these brine springs were exploited until 1921.  I could go on and
>> explain of these things - what I can't explain is the lack of national
>> recognition :(
>>
>> Bea
>>
>> Beatrice Hopkinson, President Droitwich Brine Springs and Archaeological
>> Trust,
>> American Institute of Archaeology, Los Angeles Board
>> Hon. Secretary Los Angeles Branch, Oxford University Society
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>>DCMS news release
>>>
>>>Date: July 13, 2006 Time: 12:45
>>>
>>>Mining landscape of Cornwall and West Devon becomes a UNESCO World
>>>Heritage Site
>>>
>>>The mining landscape of Cornwall and West Devon has become a World
>>>Heritage Site, following a decision by the World Heritage Committee,
>>>Culture Secretary Tessa Jowell announced today.
>>>
>>>Cornwall and West Devon has supplied much of the western world's tin and
>>>copper over the last 4,000 years and, for a time during the 18th and
>>>19th centuries, the area was the world's greatest producer of these
>>>metals. As such, it contributed substantially to Britain's Industrial
>>>Revolution and influenced mining technology and industrialisation
>>>throughout the world.
>>>
>>>It is this influence on the global culture and economy which has been
>>>acknowledged by the World Heritage Committee.
>>>
>>>Tessa Jowell said:
>>>
>>>"I am delighted that the World Heritage Committee has recognised the
>>>outstanding universal value of the Cornwall and West Devon Mining
>>>Landscape and its important contribution to national and international
>>>industrialisation. This historic area and its people have significantly
>>>influenced the development of mining and engineering culture, not just
>>>in the UK, but across the rest of the world.
>>>
>>>"To many, World Heritage status calls to mind such famous monuments as
>>>Stonehenge and the Great Wall of China. But it is important to realise
>>>that sites like the Cornwall and West Devon Mining Landscape are as
>>>deserving of recognition and protection as their more well-known
>>>companions on the World Heritage List."
>>>
>>>The addition of the Cornwall and West Devon Mining Landscape to the
>>>World Heritage List extends the UK's representation to 27 sites and
>>>heralds the UK's support for UNESCO's aim of widening the range and type
>>>of sites on the World Heritage List to include, among other categories,
>>>the industrial heritage.
>>>
>>>Notes to Editors
>>>
>>>1. The proposed Site includes all those mine sites and mining landscapes
>>>where there has been an exceptional survival of the physical remains.
>>>These are largely late 18th century, 19th century and in a few
>>>instances, pre-1914 mining remains. It does not include those widespread
>>>areas of tin streaming that survive in Cornwall and West Devon,
>>>associated with a pre-Industrial Revolution technology and therefore not
>>>considered representative of the 19th century boom years.
>>>
>>>2. Ten areas have been identified as best representing the many
>>>different facets of Cornish mining: St Just; Hayle; Tregonning; Wendron;
>>>Camborne-Redruth; Gwennap; St Agnes; Luxulan-Charlestown; Caradon; and
>>>Tamar-Tavistock.
>>>
>>>3. The Cornish Mining Industry was included in the UK's Tentative List
>>>of sites likely to be nominated in the future, World Heritage Sites -
>>>The Tentative List of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern
>>>Ireland was published by DCMS in June 1999. Inclusion on the Tentative
>>>List is a prerequisite for formal nomination.
>>>
>>>4. The concept of World Heritage Sites is at the core of the World
>>>Heritage Convention, adopted by UNESCO in 1972, to which over 180
>>>nations belong. Through the Convention, UNESCO seeks to encourage the
>>>identification, protection and preservation of the cultural and natural
>>>heritage around the world considered to be of outstanding value to
>>>humanity. The Convention required the establishment of the World
>>>Heritage List, under the management of an inter-governmental World
>>>Heritage Committee as a means of recognising that some places, both
>>>natural and cultural, are of sufficient importance to be the
>>>responsibility of the international community as a whole. As a member of
>>>the Convention, States Parties are pledged to care for their World
>>>Heritage sites as part of protecting their national heritage.
>>>
>>>5. Nominations for inscription on the World Heritage List are made by
>>>the appropriate States Parties and are subject to rigorous evaluation by
>>>expert advisers to the World Heritage Committee, International Council
>>>on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) for cultural sites and/or the World
>>>Conservation Union (IUCN) for natural sites. Decisions on the selection
>>>of new World Heritage Sites are taken by the World Heritage Committee at
>>>its annual summer meetings. There are currently 812 World Heritage Sites
>>>in 137 countries. Some 628 are cultural sites, 160 are natural and 24
>>>are mixed.
>>>
>>>6. Inclusion in the World Heritage List is essentially honorific and
>>>leaves the existing rights and obligations of owners, occupiers and
>>>planning authorities unaffected. A prerequisite for World Heritage Site
>>>status is, nevertheless, the existence of effective legal protection and
>>>the establishment of management plans agreed with site owners to ensure
>>>each site's conservation and presentation.
>>>
>>>7. The UK's World Heritage Sites are currently:
>>>
>>>Cultural
>>>
>>>Ironbridge Gorge
>>>Stonehenge, Avebury & Associated Sites
>>>Durham Castle & Cathedral
>>>Studley Royal Park including the Ruins of Fountains Abbey Castles & Town
>>>Walls of King Edward in Gwynned Blenheim Palace City of Bath Hadrian's
>>>Wall Westminster Palace, Westminster Abbey & St Margaret's Church Tower
>>>of London Canterbury Cathedral, St Augustine's Abbey & St Martin's
>>>Church Old and New Towns of Edinburgh Maritime Greenwich Heart of
>>>Neolithic Orkney The Historic Town of St George & Related
>>>Fortifications, Bermuda Blaenavon Industrial Landscape Derwent Valley
>>>Mills Saltaire New Lanark Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew Liverpool Maritime
>>>Mercantile City
>>>
>>>Natural
>>>
>>>Giant's Causeway
>>>St Kilda
>>>Henderson Island
>>>Gough and Inaccessible Islands
>>>Dorset and East Devon Coast
>>>
>>>Public Enquiries: 020 7211 6200
>>>Internet: http://www.culture.gov.uk
>>>
>>>Department for Culture, Media and Sport
>>>2-4 Cockspur Street
>>>London SW1Y 5DH
>>>www.culture.gov.uk
>>>
>>
>> 

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