JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for JISC-REPOSITORIES Archives


JISC-REPOSITORIES Archives

JISC-REPOSITORIES Archives


JISC-REPOSITORIES@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

JISC-REPOSITORIES Home

JISC-REPOSITORIES Home

JISC-REPOSITORIES  March 2006

JISC-REPOSITORIES March 2006

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

Re: Concern of longevity and lack of active engagement from researchers with institutional repositories

From:

"C.A.Pegler" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

C.A.Pegler

Date:

Fri, 31 Mar 2006 11:15:11 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (151 lines)

Amber
 
Useful summary.  Can I now burrow down into it?  Talking from a personal point of view, both as an academic and as a member of the PROWE project (www.prowe.ac.uk) which looks at the role of personal and informal repositories ...
 
There is a definite interest amongst PROWE participants in what repositories might offer, but there is also a significant caution about changing behaviour.  Many already adopt a 'belt and braces' approach to saving information in many places, 'just in case'.  Similar practices were reported through REPOMMAN in Richard Green's talk at the Warwick cluster meeting.  If academics are part-time employees (as PROWE participants are) then they may be even more cautious.  They can see that they may not always work for the same institution and they have very limited time to invest in learning a new system.  I would suggest that 'wait and see' (or 'if it ain't broke don't fix it) is a significant element in the decision-making of part-time academics.  And there are plenty of these out there. 
 
What we have so far found in terms of personal repositories (and its early days for us yet) does appear to me to be a significant element in the institutional repository mix.  It is fair to assume that most academics already have some way of disseminating work which, however imperfect from our point of view, we are now expecting them to change.  
 
Management of change (in whatever sphere) is a messy messy process.  The usual (business) take re. adoption of new innovations would be to identify early adopters and encourage spreading of the word, through to early majority etc etc. That is what a lot of the repository projects are already doing.  Its going to be slow (guess we all know that).  The problem is, as already mentioned, that the projects are often (at least initially) short term.  We learn from each project how to make the experience a better one, so that word-of-mouth is more encouraging.  But that is good news for us rather than our users.  
 
Without a business model showing clear sustainability, then it continues to be the early adopters that we attract (after all they are by definition attracted to the new), but we may not attract the early majority and the rest.  There are good arguments why they should not invest in something which is not obviously both beneficial (to them) and sustainable.  
 
If I try to look at this as a 'majority' rather than 'minority' user then I'd tend to agree with you that the 'added value' is perhaps generally not sufficient incentive to overcome the opposing forces of lack of time and risk-averseness. Personally I feel that there are clear and enticing benefits in many of the projects now underway.  But then anyone who knows me will tell you that I am by nature an early adopter sort of person.  
 
Chris

________________________________

From: Repositories discussion list on behalf of Amber Thomas
Sent: Fri 31/03/2006 09:36
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Concern of longevity and lack of active engagement from researchers with institutional repositories



I'm following this thread with interest ...

In terms of longevity in business models, do we think that potential
depositors concerns are
a) I need to know content will be kept safe over time
b) I need to know that my effort now is one-off and I won't have to deposit
this again in a another service later down the line
c) I want to see my senior management show commitment and invest in this
service before I spend my time on it

... they are subtly different concerns ...

I also think Stevan is right that there are different interests at stake:
"Let us hope that their institutions and funders will have the good sense to
adopt policies that require (and reward) their researchers for doing what is
in their own best interests (as well as the best interests of their
institutions and funders)"

Maybe preservation policies serve a need at an institutional level, and a
sector-wide level, whereas there is much less of a need from an individual
depositor: they might see preservation of their content as "added value"?,
but it doesn't service as an actual incentive to deposit?


Amber


Amber Thomas
Programme Manager, Information Environment / Repositories
JISC Executive, University of Bristol
2nd Floor, Beacon House, Queens Road, Bristol, BS8 1QU
Mobile: 07920 534933
Email: [log in to unmask]

-----Original Message-----
From: Repositories discussion list [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
On Behalf Of Theo Andrew
Sent: 31 March 2006 09:19
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Concern of longevity and lack of active engagement from
researchers with institutional repositories

Peter, Helen

When we were initially setting up our repository and looking for early
adopters to populate content (Early 2003) one of the intial barriers we hit
was the fact that we did not have a long-term business model. Because the
repository was set up with short-term project money we found that it was
hard to persuade researchers to change their research publication habits to
deposit papers with us.

So, although we found there was generally **very little or no concern about
digital preservation** from researchers, Helen is entirely correct when she
says that 'longevity here also applies to the financial sustainability of
the repository itself as a business operation, in addition to its content'.

It's a simple fact bourne out by experience- however good it's cultural or
technical benefits are, people will not wholeheartedly adopt a new
innovation (like repositories) if there are doubts over the long-term
viability.

Much as I hate analogies - think about next generation DVD players - are you
going to buy a Blu-Ray DVD (OA archives?) or HD-DVD (OA journals?) in the
next couple of months, or are you going to stick with the present DVD format
until the dust settles? (I know this analogy is not perfect because OA
archiving is perfectly compatible with OA journals and even 'toll-access'
journals, but the basic point about technology still remains true)

This is why it is important to get central funding for the repository
service, like Southampton, Edinburgh, Glasgow etc.

Theo


-----Original Message-----
From: Repositories discussion list [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
On Behalf Of Peter Nix
Sent: 30 March 2006 22:47
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: Concern of longevity and lack of active engagement from
researchers with institutional repositories

Helen,

Is it that you have already looked for, and found, a great deal of evidence
that suggests the falsity of the statement?

Peter

On 30 Mar 2006, at 21:09, Helen Hockx-Yu wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> I should be grateful if anyone can provide me some evidence to back
> the following statement:
>
> "Concern of longevity has contributed to the lack of active engagement
> from many researchers [with institutional repositories]. Guarantee of
> long-term preservation helps enhance a repository's trustworthiness by
> giving authors confidence in the future accessibility and more
> incentives to deposit content"
>
> I guess longevity here also applies to the financial sustainability of
> the repository itself as a business operation, in addition to its
> content.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Kind regards,
>
> Helen Hockx-Yu
> Programme Manager
> JISC Office, Kings College London
> Strand Bridge House (3rd Floor)
> 138-142 Strand
> London WC2R 1HH
> Tel: 020 7848 1803
> Mobile: 07813 024633
>

--
Peter Nix, AHRC CentreCATH, School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural
Studies, Old Mining Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK.
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/cath/  http://www.leeds.ac.uk/fine_art/
Eml: [log in to unmask] Tel: 0113 343 2580 Fax: 0113 343 1628

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
November 2005
October 2005


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager