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CONTEMP-HIST-ARCH  November 2005

CONTEMP-HIST-ARCH November 2005

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Subject:

FW: Art in the Land

From:

Dan Hicks <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Dan Hicks <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 9 Nov 2005 20:39:43 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (106 lines)

Forwarded message from Antonia Malcolm <[log in to unmask]>:

ART IN THE LAND: Ritual, Polemic, Speculation
 
A conference at the University of Glasgow Crichton Campus, Dumfries
Friday 31 March - Sunday 2 April 2006
 
The practice of placing works of art in the landscape is a familiar part 
of our cultural heritage, encompassing examples that range from the 
Neolithic times to the present day.  

The land, however, is not a passive or neutral context.  When a cultural 
artefact is introduced into a natural setting it becomes part of a pattern 
of relationships that is dynamic, unpredictable and subject to endless 
contestation.  

This conference is concerned with the essential duality of this 
relationship – the symbiotic ‘give and take’ in which culture and nature 
are mutually enhanced.  Using the rich legacy of south-west Scotland as a 
starting point, it will seek to unravel the complex interactions between 
art and the land as they manifest themselves in a variety of historical 
and contemporary contexts.  These include – among others - the ritual 
structures of the pre-Christian era, the ‘tamed’ landscapes of the 
Enlightenment and the ‘site-specific’ approaches that have dominated much 
recent art activity.   

The conference will be of interest to anyone involved in the creation and 
management of art in the land – such as artists, commissioners or 
custodians – as well as to all those for whom such work is a source of 
pleasure.


Confirmed Keynote Speakers are:

Charles Jencks (artist and writer, Portrack)
Andy Goldsworthy (artist, Penpont) 
Sue Clifford (Common Ground)
Mel Gooding (Senior Research Fellow, ECA)
Julian Thomas (archaeologist,Manchester)
Colin Renfrew  (archaeologist, Cambridge)

Other contributors include:

John Haddington (photographer)
Aaron Watson (archaeologist,Lancaster)
Kenny Brophy (archaeologist, Glasgow)
Peter Yeoman (Historic Scotland)
Jessie Sheeler (Little Sparta)
Peter Murray (Yorkshire Sculpture Park)
Dalziel & Scullion (artists, Fife)
Donald Urquhart (artist, Edinburgh)
Theo Jansen (artist, Holland),                  
Bryndis Snaebjornsdottir & Mark Wilson (artists, Cumbria)
 

The programme will include keynote addresses, formal presentations and 
public lectures, followed by site visits on Sunday morning.  

SESSION 1:   Ritual Structures

This session will establish the scope of the conference by considering the 
material evidence of the ‘altered earth’, with examples taken from the 
symbolic landscapes of the Neolithic and Celtic Christian periods.  How do 
we read the intentions and motives of societies from the emblematic 
structures they leave behind?  The session will draw on some of the most 
recent dialogues between archaeology, contemporary art and cultural 
theory, recognising that the processes of excavation, interpretation and 
representation are interdependent activities of embodied experience. 


 SESSION 2:  Polemical Spaces 

In this session the aim will be to consider cultural traditions connected 
with the landscape that have their roots in the Enlightenment but are 
still very relevant today. If the process of enclosing, cultivating, and 
defending the land can be defined as ‘second nature’, then the 
construction of gardens and parks creates a third type of contemplative 
space, with results that range from the tamed landscapes of the 
Picturesque to the revolutionary and cosmological propositions of Little 
Sparta and Portrack. Here, the placing of art in the landscape constitutes 
a polemical statement in which all its principal terms – art, landscape, 
audience - are open to debate.

 
SESSION 3:   The Landscape of Speculation

With the breakdown of traditional categories of practice that accompanied 
the rise of postmodernism, the approach to making art specifically for 
experiencing in the land has undergone major changes of its own.  Informed 
by a developed understanding of the meaning of place, together with a 
commitment to process-led modes of working, artists of the late C20th 
began to develop a range of new creative strategies that were driven by an 
essentially speculative engagement with the land, and as such defy 
classification according to the old typologies of art. The final session 
of the conference will be devoted to presentations by contemporary artists 
whose work constitutes, among other things, an exploration of where such 
trends are likely to lead us in the future.
 

For further information on the programme and registration, please contact 
the Conference Administrator, Antonia Malcolm on 0141-353-4464 or 
[log in to unmask]  Alternatively, please view our websites: 

http://www.cc.gla.ac.uk/land  
and
http://www.gsa.ac.uk/land 

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