JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for SIMSOC Archives


SIMSOC Archives

SIMSOC Archives


SIMSOC@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

SIMSOC Home

SIMSOC Home

SIMSOC  2005

SIMSOC 2005

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

ZUMA Workshop on Social Simulation

From:

"Klaus G. Troitzsch" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Klaus G. Troitzsch

Date:

Wed, 31 Aug 2005 08:04:40 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (115 lines)

After 1996, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 the eighth ZUMA Simulation 
Workshop will be held from October 10 to 14, 2005, at the Koblenz Campus 
of Koblenz-Landau University.

Late registration is still possible (mailto:[log in to unmask]).

This will be a workshop on the techniques of developing simulations to 
help with the exploration and understanding of social and economic issues. 
It will provide a rationale for using simulation in economics and the 
social sciences and outline a number of approaches to social simulation at 
a level of detail that would enable participants to understand the 
literature and, for some selected approaches, to develop their own 
simulations. The workshop covers the basics of modelling and simulation in 
economics and the social sciences from different points of view 
(mathematics, computer science, philosophy of science) and of seven 
different approaches to computer simulation in economics and the social 
sciences. 

The aim of this module is a broad introduction into all approaches to 
simulation in the social sciences. It covers the basics of modelling and 
simulation in the social sciences from different points of view 
(mathematics, computer science, philosophy of science) and of seven 
different approaches to computer simulation in the social sciences. 

By the end of this module, a student should understand 

* what simulation is good for in the social sciences and which steps 
should be taken to arrive at a useful computer simulation 

and he or she should know 

* which approaches have been followed by social scientist in the past 
decades, what the aims of these approaches were and which advantages and 
shortcomings these approaches have. 

Moreover, students should be able to make use of a number of different 
simulation tools and have gained some experience in designing their own 
models. 

Syllabus

Simulation and Social Science — history, taxonomy, motives, simulation 
from a philosophy of science point of view (Monday 10:30-12:00, followed 
by discussion in small groups) 

Simulation as a Method — logic of simulation, stages of simulation-based 
research (Monday 14-16, followed by reports on discussions) 

Systems Dynamics and World Models — classical approaches to macro 
simulation, differential equations, macro simulation tools, qualitative 
simulation (Tuesday 9:30-11, followed by hands-on practice with STELLA in 
F 113) 

Microanalytical Simulation Models — classical approaches to micro 
simulation, tax and pension models, recent tools (Tuesday 14-15:30) 

Queuing Models — discrete event simulation, business process modeling, 
tools (Tuesday 15:45-17) 

Multilevel Modelling — modelling global interactions between populations, 
groups and individuals, stochastic processes, synergetics (Wednesday 9:30-
11, followed by hands-on practice with MIMOSE in F 113) 

Cellular Automata — game theory, modelling local interactions in large 
populations of identical actors (Thursday 9:30-11, followed by hands-on 
practice with NetLogo in F 113) 

Distributed Artificial Intelligence Models — agent based social simulation 
(Thursday 14-15:30, followed by hands-on practice with NetLogo in F 113) 

Learning and Evolutionary Models — artificial neural networks, genetic 
algorithms (Friday 9:30-11, followed by plenary discussion) 

Teaching material

All slides and a list of references will be available in print.

Organisation

Courses and laboratories will be given by Klaus G. Troitzsch, Nigel 
Gilbert and Michael Mφhring. 

An overview will be given of all social simulation approaches (see 
Syllabus). Lectures are usually scheduled for 9:30 to 11:00 and 14:00 to 
15:30, discussion classes (Monday and Friday) and/or labs (Tuesday and 
Thursday) will be from 11:15 to 12:45 and 16:15 to 17:45. No lecture and 
lab on Friday afternoon, instead plenary discussion until about 16:00.

Participants are expected to have a model in mind of which they would like 
to build a simulation model. First ideas of these models should be 
presented in a short statement on Monday morning when participants 
introduce themselves; then groups will be formed in which these models are 
discussed in more detail and presented in another plenary discussion; the 
discussion class on Friday will give all participants an opportunity to 
revisit the ideas they had in the first class session. The groups formed 
on Monday are encouraged to meet in their own time during the week to 
prepare for this.

Laboratories will give hands-on practise in the simulation methods 
presented during the lectures. 

Participants who want to stay over the weekend may continue their work for 
the following week, advice and discussion are available). 

Participants of this and earlier workshops may apply for an Advanced 
Simulation Workshop (for more details see the announcement of the 2005 
Advanced Simulation Workshop) in April 2006. 

Find more at http://www.uni-
koblenz.de/FB4/Institutes/IWVI/AGTroitzsch/Teaching/current_teaching/ZUMA

Klaus G. Troitzsch
[log in to unmask]
www.uni-koblenz.de/~kgt

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager