JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for CRITICALIS Archives


CRITICALIS Archives

CRITICALIS Archives


CRITICALIS@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Monospaced Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CRITICALIS Home

CRITICALIS Home

CRITICALIS  2005

CRITICALIS 2005

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

FW: Call for Papers - APROS XI

From:

Carole Brooke <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Carole Brooke <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 17 Feb 2005 15:49:55 -0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (70 lines)

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Critical Perspectives on Work, Management and Organization
[mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Graham Sewell
Sent: 25 January 2005 11:27
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Call for Papers - APROS XI

APROS XI, Melbourne, Australia, 4-7 December 2005.

http://www.businessandlaw.vu.edu.au/apros/

(please note, anyone wishing to convene their own stream should contact
[log in to unmask] before 28 February 2005).

CALL FOR PAPERS

Solidarity without Class/Class without Solidarity? Taking Time to
Rethink Class in Organization Studies

Convenors: Graham Sewell and Bill Harley
Contact: [log in to unmask]

This stream invites submissions that bring new light to bear on the
problems of class, interests, and solidarity in organizations.

Having gone missing for much of the 1990s, class is back in the news.
During the 2004 US election campaign, for example, a great deal was made
of the battle for the hearts and minds of the "middle class." Whilst it
may be politically adroit to claim that we are "all middle class now"
this does not appear to be borne out by the facts: in many countries
around the Pacific Rim classic indices of "progress" like social
mobility and increasing real wages have stalled and, in some instances,
gone into reverse. Using a Weberian conception of class based on
consumption patterns, aggregate figures of rising affluence also mask
widening inequalities. At the same time, Terry Eagleton has recently
lamented the declining influence of the professional occupational groups
that have traditionally made up the middle classes (which, of course,
would include academics).

At the organizational level similar contradictory trends are evident.
Although things like "knowledge work" and "unitary interests " have been
trumpeted for years now we have also witnessed increases in part-time
work and casualization, extensive down-sizing, and concerted efforts to
marginalize unions. In sectors where there has been growth in
high-skill/high-discretion/high-pay professional occupations, this has
generally taken place alongside an expansion of
low-skill/low-discretion/low-pay jobs, which has been interpreted by
some as an increasing polarisation of jobs.

Even in the face of such developments, in recent years it seems to have
been unacceptable to mention class in organization studies circles. It
may well be the case that we can no longer read off someone's "real
interests" by locating them in some deterministic "class structure" yet,
without some notion of interests, it is difficult to develop some notion
of solidarity.
How do we respond to this? Does a neoclassical world of isolated
economic actors beckon? Has "identity" replaced class as the most
meaningful way of articulating common interests? Are Marxist notions of
class exhausted in the face of "anti-essentialism," the "de-centred
subject," and "capillary power?" Can a Weberian conception of class be
coupled with an explicit notion of exploitation? Can we have a discourse
of power without a discourse of class?

We invite theoretical and empirical submission that take on board (but
are not restricted to) such considerations. In general we seek papers
that enable us to re-conceptualize class, interests, and solidarity by
engaging critically with the "postmodern turn" in organization studies.

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
November 2017
October 2017
August 2017
May 2017
April 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
September 2016
August 2016
May 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
July 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
March 2011
January 2011
November 2010
October 2010
August 2010
July 2010
May 2010
April 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager