JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for ARCH-THEORY Archives


ARCH-THEORY Archives

ARCH-THEORY Archives


ARCH-THEORY@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

ARCH-THEORY Home

ARCH-THEORY Home

ARCH-THEORY  May 2004

ARCH-THEORY May 2004

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

EAA (sorry for crossposting!)

From:

[log in to unmask]

Reply-To:

Archaeological theory and associated fields of interest list <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 28 May 2004 11:45:36 CEST

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (67 lines)

Xth EAA meeting – Lyon (France), September 2004

Session proposal

Gender and Neolithic/Bronze Age societies : trends, critics and issues in 
continental Europe


Escaping from an exclusively English-speaking academic audience, the 
category of Gender in archaeological discourse spread over continental 
Europe in recent years. This is a quite remarkable fact indeed. While 
archaeology is traditionally embedded within social sciences in Britain, 
academic gaps remain clearly maintained elsewhere. Even earlier 
works from historians had very little impact on professional 
archaeological community. These recent studies underline that a 
growing number of scholars pay attention to an anthropologically 
informed archaeology. It also deserves the production of a deeper 
archaeological knowledge, « thick descriptions » far from cross-dating 
and cultural diagnosis.

The outbreak of Gender topic may be seen as a correlate of a widening 
academic field or a methodological renewal ; it is undoubtedly linked to 
a data re-examination and a new way of asking from scholars facing 
ancient material cultures, as well as to changing social and political 
reality of our presence. Epistemological relationships between Gender 
and technique (production, know-how, innovation) or Gender and social 
processes (negotiations of status and identity, cultural transmission) do 
became key issues. One might venture they actually constitute the main 
interpretation frame for the Neolithic and Bronze Age studies. 

It is also the opportunity to challenge the most often androcentric 
common stereotypes : denial of social complexity ; question of equality 
of social status prior to the spread of copper metallurgy, equal status 
between men and women in Neolithic societies, material culture 
irrelevance for gender inquiry, etc. 

Considering the data on technology, material culture, analysis of burial 
rites, dwelling analysis, rock art studies, etc. we aim to re-examine the 
gender relationships in prehistoric societies as well as shed light on 
social position of different gender categories. Much of the prehistoric 
woman’s world, however, belong to the sphere of undiscovered reality. 
The representation of cultural norms and social behavioral the 
prehistoric reality is often coded within symbolic meanings of artefacts 
and in relations between them. Reading these seemingly invisible 
relationships offers chance for re-examination of gender structure and 
norms of past societies.

Maxence Bailly
ESEP UMR 6636 CNRS
Maison Méditerranéenne des Sciences de l’Homme
5, rue du Château de l’Horloge – B. P. 647
13094 AIX-EN-PROVENCE CEDEX 2
France
[log in to unmask]
tel. 00 33 (0)4 42 52 49 40
fax. 00 33 (0)4 42 52 43 77


Jan Turek
Department of Archaeology
University of West Bohemia
Sedlackova 31
306 14  PLZEN
Czech Republic
[log in to unmask]
Tel.  00 420 723 860 800
Fax. 00 420 235 352 863

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

January 2018
December 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
July 2006
May 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998


WWW.JISCMAIL.AC.UK

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager