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SPACESYNTAX  2004

SPACESYNTAX 2004

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Subject:

Re: down town guy

From:

Ruth Conroy Dalton <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Wed, 3 Nov 2004 22:06:50 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

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text/plain (62 lines)

Midtown is not just a Manhattan term, it is certainly used in
Atlanta, which, incidentally, also breaks Noah Raford's "downtown is
the low-numbered streets" rule of thumb. In Atlanta, there is a
downtown, which is (sort of) the CBD. The streets in downtown are not
numbered streets. Midtown is about a mile and a half north of
downtown, and includes the low-numbered streets. Then, continuing
north, there is Buckhead, which probably would be Atlanta's uptown
(but never described as such, but fulfills Raford's description).
Finally, many miles north there is an emerging fourth center called,
wonderfully, "Perimeter Center" which no one seems to recognize as an
oxymoron.

Ruth



>Dear Tom
>
>Interesting question, as an ex-pat Yankee, this is my colloquial
>understanding of the question. I would expect that these terms are being
>used in relation to New York city and more specifically Manhattan. However,
>down-town is a more American generic term for the Central Business
>District, this is usually fairly well identified in most American cities.
>In Manhattan this would be the area up to Houston for example, or there
>abouts. The term mid-town in Manhattan is Houston to 57th (the lower edge
>of Central park) and Up-Town is 57th to 125th, either side of Central Park.
>I have not heard the these last two terms used to describe locations in
>anywhere but New York, but my experience is living primarily on the
>East Coast.
>
>Hope this is helpful
>
>Peter
>
>
>
>
>At 10:27 02/11/2004, you wrote:
>>Dear All
>>
>>It might seem a silly question, but can anyone help me with the terms
>>up-town, mid-town and down-town, which I find in a lot of American
>>literature.
>>
>>I know that down-town is used for the commercial centre of the city,
>>which seems paradoxical for the most expensive property.
>>
>>But what about the other terms?  Do they have any spatial significance
>>(like suburb / centre)?  do they refer to land-use (housing, industrial
>>etc)? or do they refer to social class / economic status?
>>
>>thanks   Tom
>>
>>  Thomas Dine
>>  CHASSAY+LAST ARCHITECTS
>>  BERKELEY WORKS
>>  BERKLEY GROVE
>>  LONDON NW1 8XY
>>
>>  Direct Line 020 7483 7722
>>  Fax 020 7483 7733
>>  e-mail: [log in to unmask]

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