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Subject:

Re: down town guy

From:

Irene Lopez de Vallejo <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Tue, 2 Nov 2004 19:18:57 +0000

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (115 lines)

Or in Bilbao (Basque Contry, Spain) : Margen Derecha/Margen Izquierda of the
River. In this case, the river divides not only the city of Bilbao, but form
there to the sea (aprox 10 km) in each bank there are different cities:
Right Bank - the posh cities/towns such as Las Arenas, Getxo
Left Bank - the poor, industrial cities/towns such as Barakaldo, Sestao,
Portugalete
--
Irene Lopez de Vallejo
UCL - The Barlett
http://www.ucl.ac.uk
http://www.bartlett.ucl.ac.uk/


Quoting Frederico de Holanda <[log in to unmask]>:

> Or in Paris: rive gauche / rive droite...
>
> Or in Rio: north zone / south zone...
>
> Or in Brasília: Pilot Plan / the rest...
>
> Fred
>
> Frederico de Holanda
>
> Cond. Vivendas Colorado 1, Mod. J, Casa 1
> 73070-015  Brasília  DF
> Brasil
>
> Fone / Phone: (0xx61) 4859641  /  +55614859641
> Celular / Mobile: (0xx61) 99871724  /  +556199871724
>   ----- Original Message -----
>   From: Alan Penn
>   To: [log in to unmask]
>   Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 2004 11:40 AM
>   Subject: Re: down town guy
>
>
>   I guess similar spatial concepts exits in the European city in terms of
>   'left bank' and 'right bank'...?
>
>   Alan
>
>
>   > -----Original Message-----
>   > From: [log in to unmask] [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On
>   > Behalf Of Noah Raford
>   > Sent: 02 November 2004 10:46
>   > To: [log in to unmask]
>   > Subject: Re: down town guy
>   >
>   > Dear Tom,
>   >
>   > I understand how you feel because these terms are often used for mixed
>   > meanings.  Hopefully as an American planner I can offer some helpful
>   > suggestions.
>   >
>   > The terms up-town, mid-town, and down-town relate more to the geography
>   > of a specific city (such as Manhattan) than to technical planning terms.
>   > "Downtown" refers to low numbered streets, often in the historic centre
>   > of town, while "uptown" refers to high numbered streets (like 4th Street
>   > versus 152nd Street).  But they often carry socio-economic implications
>   > as well and can be suggestive of the types of land-uses in each area.
>   >
>   > In general, "downtown" refers to the central business district (CBD) and
>   > is roughly akin to the City here in London.  Skyscrapers, financial
>   > institutions, and often government offices in the case of many US
>   > cities.  Most American cities don't really have a "midtown", but this
>   > could be thought of as the medium density, lower rent offices, light
>   > industrial, entertainment / service oriented parts of town, often with
>   > some housing.  Finally, "uptown" tends to be where all the posh folks
>   > live in expensive old flats.  It is near the city centre, has high end
>   > retail, etc.  Kind of like Kensington, except that most US cities don't
>   > have neighbourhoods that posh!
>   >
>   > All of these are different from suburbs, which tend to be dominated by
>   > single family, free standing residential ranch houses.
>   >
>   > Hope this helps!
>   >
>   > Noah
>   >
>   >
>   >
>   > -----Original Message-----
>   > From: Tom Dine [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
>   > Sent: 02 November 2004 10:28
>   > To: [log in to unmask]
>   > Subject: down town guy
>   >
>   >
>   > Dear All
>   >
>   > It might seem a silly question, but can anyone help me with the terms
>   > up-town, mid-town and down-town, which I find in a lot of American
>   > literature.
>   >
>   > I know that down-town is used for the commercial centre of the city,
>   > which seems paradoxical for the most expensive property.
>   >
>   > But what about the other terms?  Do they have any spatial significance
>   > (like suburb / centre)?  do they refer to land-use (housing, industrial
>   > etc)? or do they refer to social class / economic status?
>   >
>   > thanks   Tom
>   >
>   >  Thomas Dine
>   >  CHASSAY+LAST ARCHITECTS
>   >  BERKELEY WORKS
>   >  BERKLEY GROVE
>   >  LONDON NW1 8XY
>   >
>   >  Direct Line 020 7483 7722
>   >  Fax 020 7483 7733
>   >  e-mail: [log in to unmask]

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