JiscMail Logo
Email discussion lists for the UK Education and Research communities

Help for EAST-WEST-RESEARCH Archives


EAST-WEST-RESEARCH Archives

EAST-WEST-RESEARCH Archives


EAST-WEST-RESEARCH@JISCMAIL.AC.UK


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

EAST-WEST-RESEARCH Home

EAST-WEST-RESEARCH Home

EAST-WEST-RESEARCH  September 2003

EAST-WEST-RESEARCH September 2003

Options

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password

Subject:

How information reaches the desk of President Putin

From:

Andrew Jameson <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Andrew Jameson <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 4 Sep 2003 17:11:45 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (89 lines)

Johnson's Russia List
#7312
4 September 2003
[log in to unmask]
A CDI Project
www.cdi.org

#9
Argumenty i Fakty
September 3, 2003
CAN THE PRESIDENT BE DECEIVED?
How information reaches the desk of President Putin
Author: Vyacheslav Kostikov
[from WPS Monitoring Agency, www.wps.ru/e_index.html]
THEY SAY GOD SEES ALL AND CAN NEVER BE DECEIVED. BUT WHAT DO THOSE
WHO HOLD SUPREME POWER IN THIS WORLD SEE AND HEAR? WE OFTEN RECEIVE
READERS' LETTERS WITH QUESTIONS OF THIS NATURE. PEOPLE ARE CONCERNED
ABOUT WHETHER THE PRESIDENT IS FULLY INFORMED. COMMENTS FROM
VYACHESLAV KOSTIKOV, FORMER PRESS SECRETARY TO THE PRESIDENT.

     There are around ten files on the president's desk every day:
some permanent, others temporary. The permanent files include agendas
for Cabinet meetings and "discussion materials" - a multitude of
figures and assessments. The president's economic aide needs to point
out any cases of "the prime minister's cunning" or the influence of
lobby groups.
     The daily menu also includes media digests. A media digest is a
significant channel of influence. Bias in selecting information could
lead the president to "turn against" some particular individual or
project.
     There are also daily reports from the Federal Security Service
(FSB), the Interior Ministry, and the Foreign Intelligence Service
(SVR). These are usually one or two pages of dry text. The heads of
these agencies deliver reports to the president in person at their
weekly meetings.
     Reports from the president's advisors also reach his desk.
However, the advisors themselves might be lobbying in somebody's
interests. Some projects requiring presidential approval are worth
billions of dollars. The influence of aides in Putin's team is not as
strong as it was in Yeltsin's team. Many of their functions have been
taken over by directorates of the presidential administration. The
system has grown more bureaucratic. The spectrum of opinions has
become less diverse. Yeltsin, for example, liked to organize a clash
of opinions between his aides, the head of the presidential
administration, the presidential council, and the security and law
enforcement people. It was a way of double-checking decisions. He
never trusted anyone completely.
     The amount that the president can read in a day greatly depends
on the head of the president's personal secretariat. This is the
person who places the files on the president's desk. As a rule, there
are many more documents than the president can read in the course of
his working day. Which documents will be at the top of the pile? If,
in the course of several days, the president doesn't read a document
that's "accidentally" ended up at the bottom of the pile, its author
may be told that "the president wasn't interested in it."
     Information from the regions comes in via the presidential envoys
and regional leaders. It is supplemented by reports from regional
directorates of the FSB; however, they sometimes seek to avoid ruining
their relationship with regional authorities.
     Around once a month, the Kremlin's correspondence office presents
a selection of quotes taken from citizens' letters. An influx of
"letters from workers" may be organized with the help of a regional
leader or the FSB.
     In the Soviet era, the regime feared opinion polls like the Devil
fears incense. Only the KGB carried out strictly confidential polls.
In the past decade, opinion polls have been one of the Kremlin's
important sources of objective information for the president. However,
they have now been devalued because the regime has started patronizing
particular polling agencies.
     Ever since big business came into existence in post-Soviet
Russia, there has been a new way of presenting information to the
president. An oligarch, a business group, a security structure, or
someone from within the Kremlin itself will order a think-tank to
produce "a report on a set topic." Then part of this "secret" report
is leaked to the media. Articles written to order are published. The
scandal spreads to the foreign media (often in exchange for millions
of dollars). Then the president demands to see the original report.
Mission accomplished. There was such a case recently, involving the
report entitled "An oligarchic coup is being prepared in Russia." Its
authors are known, but it has never been discovered who ordered that
report.
     When Vladimir Putin was being trained as an intelligence agent,
he was probably instructed in "the basics of special propaganda and
disinformation." We can only hope that he knows how to protect his own
ears from news that is too good to be true.
(Translated by Sergei Kolosov)

********

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

JiscMail Tools


RSS Feeds and Sharing


Advanced Options


Archives

October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998


JiscMail is a Jisc service.

View our service policies at https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/policyandsecurity/ and Jisc's privacy policy at https://www.jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager